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David Fallows

An instruction to slow down the tempo and often to develop a fuller and more majestic performing style. But this is not always intended. Verdi, for example, almost invariably accompanied allargando with a decrease in texture or volume; thus the very end of the prelude to ...

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Miriam Miller

(d 1634). English music printer. He printed a few musical works between 1610 and 1615, only his initials ‘E.A.’ appearing on certain imprints. He printed Thomas Ravenscroft’s A Briefe Discourse (1614) and John Amner’s Sacred Hymnes of 3, 4, 5 and 6 parts for Voyces and Vyols...

Article

Alan Lewis

Mixed troupe of popular vocalists and bell ringers. Organized at New York City in 1846 and billed early as the “Alleghanians, or American Singers,” the group, usually a quartet, toured widely from 1847. Members at that time included James M. Boulard (bass), Richard Dunning (tenor), Carrie Hiffert (contralto), and William H. Oakley (alto). From the start, comparisons to the Rainer and Hutchinson family troupes were common. Miriam G. Goodenow, a young soprano, replaced Hiffert, evidently in ...

Article

Curtis Price and Patrick Carnegy

The treatment of a subject in the guise of another which it resembles; in opera, investing plots, characters and scenography with symbolical or metaphorical meaning.

From the beginning opera was to some extent allegorical, borrowing what was essentially a literary device already well established in spoken drama, the ...

Article

Raffaele Pozzi

(b Palermo, July 17, 1898; d Florence, Dec 9, 1993). Italian composer. He studied at the Palermo Conservatory with Cilea and Antonio Favara, graduating in 1917. He held office as president of the Cassa Nazionale Assistenza Musicisti and as honorary president of the Italian Musicians’ Union. He is known mainly as a composer of operettas and operas in which he followed a conservative, late ...

Article

Roland Würtz and Paul Corneilson

(b Venice, 1754; d Ireland, after 1801). Italian soprano. She made her début in 1770 in Venice and in 1771 went from Florence to Mannheim, possibly on a recommendation by Casanova to the Mannheim court poet, Mattia Verazi. Holzbauer gave her singing lessons and employed her as second soubrette in the court opera (...

Article

David Fallows

A tempo (and mood) designation, normally indicating something a little less fast, and perhaps a little more lighthearted, than Allegro. But there is some evidence that in Paris around 1800 it was understood to be faster than allegro, most specifically in J.B. Cartier's L'art du violon...

Article

Colin Timms

(b Rome, c1585; d Rome, Sept 5, 1629). Italian composer. He was brought up in Rome. He was a private pupil of G.B. Nanino from April 1594 and a choirboy at S Luigi dei Francesi from October 1595; by February 1596 he was learning to compose. He left S Luigi in ...

Article

Jerome Roche and Noel O’Regan

(b Rome, 1582; d Rome, Feb 7, 1652). Italian composer and singer, brother of Domenico Allegri. From 1591 to 1596 he was a boy chorister and from 1601 to 1604 a tenor at S Luigi dei Francesi, Rome, where the maestro di cappella...

Article

Edmond Strainchamps

(b Florence, Nov 16, 1567; d Florence, July 15, 1648). Italian composer and lutenist. Cesare Tinghi, the Medici court diarist, called him (in Solerti) ‘Lorenzo [or Lorenzino] todesco del liuto’, which has encouraged the notion that he may have been German, but his baptismal record confirms that he was from Florence. He entered the ranks of salaried musicians at the Medici court on ...

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Superlative of Allegro.

Article

Allegro  

David Fallows

The most common tempo designation in Western music. It was often abbreviated, particularly in the 18th century, to all°. Practically all the lists of tempo marks in musical dictionaries and handbooks give allegro as the standard moderately fast tempo, though its very ubiquity has led to its use with a variety of different shades of meaning: as early as ...

Article

In the Byzantine Divine Liturgy, the equivalent of the alleluia verse of the Roman Mass. According to medieval descriptions of the Byzantine rite, the allēlouïa was preceded by the chanted announcement of the psaltēs: ‘Allēlouïa, a psalm of David’. The psaltēs then sang ‘allēlouïa’ to one of six non-melismatic melodies, followed by the ...

Article

James W. McKinnon and Christian Thodberg

Chant of the Mass in the Western Church and of the Divine Liturgy in the Eastern Church.

The alleluia of the Mass is a Proper chant sung during the Fore-Mass after the gradual (see Gradual) except on liturgical occasions associated with penitence and fasting (most notably during Lent), and on ones associated with sorrow (such as the Requiem Mass), when it may be replaced by the ...

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Alleluia Latinized form of Heb. halleluyah: ‘praise God’ Gk. allēlouïa I. Latin rite 5. 8th- and 9th-century Frankish repertory.: Ex.1 Alleluia, Dominus regnavit decorem

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Alleluia Latinized form of Heb. halleluyah: ‘praise God’ Gk. allēlouïa I. Latin rite 6. Later history.: Ex.2 Alleluia, Veni Sancte Spiritus

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Alleluia Latinized form of Heb. halleluyah: ‘praise God’ Gk. allēlouïa II. Byzantine rite 1. The Byzantine ‘allēlouïarion’.: Ex.3

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Alleluia Latinized form of Heb. halleluyah: ‘praise God’ Gk. allēlouïa II. Byzantine rite 1. The Byzantine ‘allēlouïarion’.: Ex.4

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Alleluia Latinized form of Heb. halleluyah: ‘praise God’ Gk. allēlouïa II. Byzantine rite 2. The Byzantine ‘allēlouïa’ and Roman alleluia.: Ex.5

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Alleluia Verses at Easter Week Vespers