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Lavern J. Wagner

(b Arras; d ?Madrid, 1582). Flemish organist active in Italy and Spain. On 1 January 1556 he was engaged at the ducal chapel of Parma. In 1580 he was organist in the chapel of Philip II of Spain, as is shown by a receipt that he signed for wages. His tenure there continued until his death. A madrigal by him, ...

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(b end of the 15th century; d Speyer, July 1534). German organist and composer. There is no evidence to support Jauernig’s assumption that he was the Balthasar Pistorius from Besike who matriculated at Heidelberg University on 12 April 1498. Arthopius was organist in Weissenburg (now Wissembourg), Alsace, around ...

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(b Grodzisk, nr Poznań, July 26, 1552; d Toruń, Aug 2, 1609). Polish clergyman and hymnbook compiler. He first studied at Grodzisk, was then, from 1573, a private tutor at Ostroróg and in 1577–8 attended the University of Wittenberg. An outstanding Protestant divine, he spent his whole career as a preacher – in Warsaw from ...

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Pier Paolo Scattolin

(b Ravenna, bap. Oct 2, 1554; d Ravenna, before May 6, 1604). Italian composer, lawyer, poet and orator. According to Mazzuchelli, he was born in Forlì. His only known musical work is Il primo libro de madrigali a cinque voci (Venice, 1598), dedicated to Paolo Savelli, which contains 23 madrigals, including a setting of Guarini’s popular ...

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(b c1478; d after 1513). English composer. He was admitted as a chorister to St George’s Chapel, Windsor, on 29 October 1491 and remained there until 14 January 1493. The roll of accounts of the stewards of Tattershall College, Lincolnshire, for Michaelmas ...

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Diana Poulton

(fl c1595). Nothing is known of his identity. His extant compositions for lute are mostly in the University Library of Cambridge: they comprise a Jigg (Dd.2.11, f.100 and Dd.5.78, f.32v); Askewes Galliarde (Dd.2.11, f.80); R. Askue (one part of a duet; Dd.9.33, f.88...

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(b Verona, ?1532 or earlier; d Venice, Oct 1, 1609). Italian composer. On 7 May 1546 he entered the congregation of secular canons of S Giorgio in Alga. After this he probably studied with Vincenzo Ruffo in Verona. From 1566 until his death he held benefices at S Stefano, Verona. After ...

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Robert L. Kendrick

(b ?Pavia, c1590; d Lomello, after 1618). Italian composer and nun. Assandra alluded to Pavia as her birthplace in the dedication of her surviving motet book, Motetti à due, & tre voci, op.2 (Milan, 1609³, 1 ed. in Bowers, 1996), which is dedicated to G.B. Biglia, the Bishop of Pavia. Her musical talents were noted early by the publisher Lomazzo in the dedication to G.P. Cima’s ...

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(b c1485; bur. Leicester, Nov 17, 1558). English composer. On 20 November 1510 he supplicated at Oxford University for the degree of BMus, stating that he had spent eight years in the study of music and submitting a mass and an antiphon as his exercise. He apparently lived in Coventry in about ...

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David Lasocki, Denis Arnold and Fabio Ferraccioli

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Keith A. Larson

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August Scharnagl

(b Lichtenstein, nr Zwickau, c1553; d in or after 1610). German composer and organist. He is first heard of as an organist at Amorbach, Odenwald, in 1570 and until February 1571. The dedication of his Cantiones sacrae (1572) was written from Falkenau, Bohemia, where his father was working. According to Gerber he was later an organist at Altenburg and then, until ...

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T. Herman Keahey

(b Abensberg, July 4, 1477; d Regensburg, Jan 9, 1534). German historian and music theorist. He studied at Ingolstadt University with Conradus Celtis, at Kraków University, and at Paris University with Jacobus Faber Stapulensis. After the death of Albrecht IV, Aventinus was appointed tutor to the young Duke of Bavaria and his brothers in ...

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Avery  

John Bergsagel

(b ?c1470; d ?c1543). English composer. Among the English authorities to whom Thomas Morley referred in preparing his A Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke (1597) is one listed simply as ‘Averie’. This is undoubtedly the ‘Master Averie’ who composed an organ ...

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(b Tonnedorf, nr Erfurt; d Eisenberg, nr Gera, Jan 22, 1617). German writer on music, composer and schoolmaster. In 1579 he was teaching at the Lateinschule at Ronneburg, near Gera, and in 1591 he was Rektor of the Lateinschule at Gera. Later he was a preacher at Bernsdorf, near Torgau, at Munich and at Krossen, near Gera, and from ...

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(b Portalegre; d Granada, between 13 Sept and Oct 25, 1630). Portuguese composer. He was a choirboy at Portalegre Cathedral, where according to Barbosa Machado he studied with António Ferro. By 1601 he was maestro de capilla at Úbeda. Early that year he tried for a similar post at the royal chapel at nearby Granada but did not secure it until two years later; he was inducted on ...

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Almonte Howell

(b Barasoain, c1491; d Rome, 1586). Spanish churchman and jurisconsult. He taught in Salamanca and Coimbra and spent his last 19 years in Rome, revered for his learning and piety. His numerous Latin writings were published throughout Europe in the 16th and early 17th centuries. Forkel, Fétis and others credited him with a musical treatise, ...

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Anne Schnoebelen

(b Bologna; fl 1557–69). Italian composer. He is believed to have been a singer in one of the Bolognese churches, though probably not S Petronio since he is not mentioned in the account books; he may have been connected with members of the Bolognese singing academies as described by Giustiniani. His first two books of villottas were published anonymously and he acknowledged all three only in the third book, after the first two had been sufficiently successful to be reprinted. The value of these collections lies in their preservation of popular texts and melodies arranged in simple four-part homophonic settings following the rhythm of the words, in which the top voice usually carries the melody. The first book contains 20 villottas, together with a ‘todesca’ by Girardo da Panico and madrigals by Caldarino, Spontone, Ruffo and ‘P.H.’, whom Vatielli believed to be Pietro de Hostia. Of interest is ...

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Pierre M. Tagmann and Giovanni Maria Bacchini

(b Mantua; fl 1588–1607). Italian singer, composer and theorist. Canal erroneously gave his first name as Girolamo. He was a Carmelite priest. While at the Mantuan court, he wrote a treatise, De musica, now lost. In 1588 he published a madrigal, Più che Diana...