101-120 of 1,606 results  for:

  • Early 18th c./Late Baroque (1700-1750) x
Clear all

Article

David Johnson

(b Lucca, 1690; d London, 1772). Italian composer. He studied scientific subjects at the University of Padua, and then devoted himself to music. In 1714 he went to London with Francesco Geminiani (also a native of Lucca); there he played the flute and oboe in the orchestra at the Italian opera, and published three sets of solo sonatas. According to Bonaccorsi, he was back in Lucca in ...

Article

(b Copenhagen, Sept 10, 1655; d ?Copenhagen, June 11, 1738). Danish anatomist, doctor of medicine, and polymath. Scion of a famous family of doctors and natural philosophers, he began medical studies with his father in 1671 and three years later was appointed professor of philosophy by King Christian IV. He then travelled for several years, and working in Paris with the anatomist Joseph Guichard Duverney, he first described ‘Bartholin’s glands’ in a cow. Returning to Copenhagen, he took up medical practice and taught medicine and anatomy. In ...

Article

Michael Talbot and Enrico Careri

In 

See Laurenti family

Article

Anne Beetem Acker

(bap. London, England, Jan 1, 1685; d London, England, by 1735). English spinet and harpsichord maker. His father, also Thomas, was a butcher. He was apprenticed to Stephen Keene from 1 Aug 1699 for seven years and his initials (TB) appear in a Keene spinet of ...

Article

Owain Edwards and David Lasocki

(fl 1708–39). English composer, recorder player and cellist. From 1708 to 1714 he and his brother Thomas (fl 1708–27), a violinist and probably also a recorder player, played in concerts at Stationers' Hall and Coachmakers' Hall, London, and at Greenwich. When the Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre opened in ...

Article

Neal Zaslaw and Robert A. Green

(b Versailles, early 18th century; d Paris, after 1754). French composer and virtuoso on the hurdy-gurdy, son of Henri Bâton, who revolutionized the construction of the instrument. The jurist Antoine Terrasson, a contemporary of Bâton le jeune, an amateur player of the veille, and author of a history of the vielle, recounted his progress:...

Article

Neal Zaslaw

(b late 17th century; d Versailles, ?1728). French luthier and player on the musette and hurdy-gurdy. As early as 1672 Borjon de Scellery remarked upon the popularity of the musette among the French noblemen and the hurdy-gurdy among noble ladies. Bâton l'aîné took advantage of the continuing fashion for rustic instruments, and worked at transforming the musette and hurdy-gurdy from folk instruments into art ones. His younger contemporary Terrasson wrote:...

Article

G. Kaleschke

(b Germany, 1714; d Germany, 1794). German organ builder. Initially a carpenter, he began work as an organ builder about 1749 and was probably apprenticed to the Stumm brothers in Rhaunen-Sulzbach. His work was restricted to the Zweibrücken area, where he was respected as a capable organ builder and surveyor. His 12 or so surviving single-manual organs have colourful specifications with characteristic stops (Streicherstimmen, Cornett, Trompete Diskant); the most important is at Bad Bergzabern (formerly in the Schlosskirche). Of his children, only Konrad Isaac (...

Article

Heike Fricke

(bc1708; d Vienna, Austria, July 17, 1775). Austrian woodwind maker. Variant spellings such as R. Paur, Rockobauer, Rockopauer, Ruckebauer, and Rochebaur presumably refer to the same person. In the parish books of St Michael’s Church in Vienna he is listed as a civic wind player (...

Article

Hugh J. McLean

(b Geisenheim, nr Würzburg, 1710; d Würzburg, 1749). German organist and composer. He had some lessons from his father, headmaster of the school at Geisenheim, and seems to have had a natural musical talent, as well as a good voice which secured a place for him at the Hospitalsschule in Würzburg. He became organist of Würzburg Cathedral and later studied and practised law. In ...

Article

(b Paris, 1689; d Paris, March 22, 1781). French dramatist and literary historian. A prolific writer of ballets, comedies, harlequinades and licentious tales disguised in the garb of classical antiquity, Beauchamps seems to have begun his career in 1714 when he wrote the words for the divertissement ...

Article

John Walter Hill

(b Florence, Nov 8, 1679; d ?Prato, 1734). Italian theorist and composer. Beccatelli’s early musical studies were under Virgilio Cionchi and G.M. Casini in Florence. By order of Grand Duke Cosimo III, he was made maestro di cappella and organist of Prato Cathedral in ...

Article

Kenneth Sparr

(b Askersund, Sweden, 1717; d Stockholm, Sweden, 1763). Swedish luthier, active in Stockholm from 1736. He made bowed and plucked instruments and was inspired by Guersan and the old Parisian school, as was his apprentice Johan Öberg. Some of his instruments are stamped ‘S. BECKMAN’ and numbered. In ...

Article

William Weber

(b Tiddenham, Glos., Sept 8, 1668; d Hoxton, London, Aug 13, 1745). English clergyman, scholar and writer. He held clerical positions in Bristol from 1693, in Newton St Loo, near Bath, from 1713, and at the Haberdashers’ Hospital, Hoxton, from 1724. He supposedly was chaplain to the first two dukes of Bedford, and in his later years to Frederick, Prince of Wales, but does not seem to have served actively in their households. He was a major figure in the campaign against the theatres, publishing ...

Article

Sally Drage

(bap. Sunningwell, Oxon., June 23, 1700; d after 1758). English psalmodist and singing teacher . He was a farmer's son. One of the first itinerant singing teachers to engrave and print his own music, he was arguably the ‘father’ of the fuging-tune, which became popular in England and America during the late 18th century. A psalmody book, apparently produced in the mid-1720s, has not survived, but four later publications, all undated, make a substantial contribution to our knowledge of country psalmody. The different editions had identical titles, but the use of separate engraving plates meant that contents could vary according to the purchaser's requirements. The music, which Beesly collected but may not have composed, exemplifies the bare harmony and unresolved dissonance of much early Gallery music. Although a few previous examples exist, his claim that the 20 new psalm tunes were ‘Compos'd with veriety of Fuges after a different manner to any yet extant’ is fully justified; his tune to Psalm viii was widely reprinted....

Article

(b Eberbach, March 1, 1691; d Ephrata, PA, July 6, 1768). American composer of German birth. He was baptized into the Calvinist faith as Georg (not Johann) Conrad on 4 August 1691. He found himself in conflict with the church authorities because of his religious views, and in ...

Article

(b Bologna, fl 1716–67). Italian singer. She is referred to in some programmes as Ferrarese – perhaps through confusion with her father, the bass Francesco Belisani – but is the ‘Belisania’ mentioned in the celebrated frontispiece of Marcello’s Il teatro alla moda. She sang in ...

Article

John Hajdu Heyer

(b Aix-en-Provence, Aug 8, 1693; d Marseilles, Feb 12, 1762). French composer. His home was near the Cathedral of St Sauveur in Aix; although there is no evidence that he was admitted to the choir school, he was probably one of the last composers to study with Guillaume Poitevin, ...

Article

Marius Flothuis

(b Zuylen castle, nr Utrecht, Oct 20, 1740; d Colombier, Switzerland, Dec 26, 1805). Dutch writer and composer. From 1771 she lived in Switzerland with her husband Charles-Emmanuel de Charrière de Penthaz. She is remembered especially for her extensive, witty and often caustic correspondence with James Boswell, Benjamin Constant, Germaine de Staël and others (see M. Flothuis: ‘An Unexpected Source of Musical Information: the Correspondence of Belle van Zuylen (...

Article

William Drabkin

German family of musicians.

(b Erfurt, 1696; d Minden, April 1, 1758). Composer. He studied philosophy, history and finally law in Erfurt and also had some theoretical and practical training in music. In 1719 he left Erfurt to take up the post of Kantor in Minden, where he had a successful career as a composer and teacher. In ...