1,181-1,200 of 57,904 results

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Alleluias with Continuity of Liturgical Assignment between Roman and Frankish Sources

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Alleluiatic antiphons sung at Matins and Vespers in the Mozarabic rite. See Mozarabic chant, §3, (ii).

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A term denoting Psalms cxlviii–cl when sung in the liturgy in the Gallican rite. See Antiphon, §1, and Gallican chant.

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Meredith Ellis Little and Suzanne G. Cusick

One of the most popular of Baroque instrumental dances and a standard movement, along with the courante, sarabande and gigue, of the suite. It originated some time in the early or mid-16th century, appearing under such titles as ‘Teutschertanz’ or ‘Dantz’ in Germany and ‘bal todescho’, ‘bal francese’ and ‘tedesco’ in Italy. Originally a moderate duple-metre dance in two or three strains, the allemande came to be one of the most highly stylized of all Baroque dances and by ...

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Allemande allemand almain alman almond ‘German [dance]’ alemana allemanda 1. 16th-century allemandes.: Ex.1 Adrian Le Roy: Almande from Premier livre de tabulature de luth (Paris, 1551)

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Allemande allemand almain alman almond ‘German [dance]’ alemana allemanda 1. 16th-century allemandes.: Ex.2 Allemana d’Amor, GB-Lbl Roy.App.75, f.44r. The manuscript has key signatures of one flat in the Altus and Tenor parts.

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Allemande allemand almain alman almond ‘German [dance]’ alemana allemanda 2. Solo allemandes for keyboard and lute.: Ex.3 François de Chancy: Allemande pour luth from Mersenne: Harmonie universelle, ii (1637), 88

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Allemande allemand almain alman almond ‘German [dance]’ alemana allemanda 2. Solo allemandes for keyboard and lute.: Ex.4 Chambonnières: Allemande from Pièces de clavessin, ii (1670)

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Allemande allemand almain alman almond ‘German [dance]’ alemana allemanda 2. Solo allemandes for keyboard and lute.: Ex.5 Allemandes by Froberger (c1681) and J.S. Bach (c1722)

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Allemande allemand almain alman almond ‘German [dance]’ alemana allemanda 3. Ensemble allemandes.: Ex.6 (a) J. Pachelbel: Allemande from Suite in E (b) J. Pachelbel: Allemande from Sonata for 2 violins and continuo

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(b Campbell, oh , March 17, 1930). American mezzo-soprano . She studied at Wilberforce University and the Hartford School of Music, later with Sarah Peck More, Zinka Milanov and Paul Ulanowsky. Chosen by Leonard Bernstein to sing in a performance of his Jeremiah Symphony in ...

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Hugh Davies

An Electronic organ designed by Jerome Markowitz (1917–91) between 1937 and 1939, and manufactured from 1939 in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and from 1953 in nearby Macungie. The Allen Organ Co. was founded in 1945; besides many models of the organ, it has manufactured two electronic harpsichords (introduced in ...

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Meredith Eliassen

(b Campbell, near Youngstown, OH, March 17, 1930; d Bronxville, NY, June 22, 2009). American mezzo-soprano. Allen was first exposed to opera listening to a neighbor’s radio while growing up in a working-class neighborhood. She entered foster care aged 12 and later studied on scholarships at the historically black Wilberforce University, where the tenor Theodore Heimann steered her towards opera. Allen continued on scholarships at the Hartford School of Music, working with Sarah Peck More, ...

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Gary W. Kennedy

(b Omaha, NE, Dec 9, 1939). American alto saxophonist. In 1949 his family moved to Los Angeles, where he started on clarinet, though in 1952 he changed to alto saxophone. At John Coltrane’s urging, Allen became a musician and in February 1964 he moved to New York. That year he recorded a free-jazz album, ...

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Gary W. Kennedy

(b Milwaukee, April 25, 1961). American drummer and leader, brother of Eddie Allen. His mother was a gospel singer and an elder brother also played drums. He took up drums around the age of ten, was a member of a drum and bugle corps when he was 13, and organized his first jazz group a year later. The director of his high school band, who was himself a drummer, introduced him to recordings by Sid Catlett, Baby Dodds, Roy Haynes, and Philly Joe Jones. Allen performed locally with Sonny Stitt and Red Holloway at the age of 16 and then worked with James Moody. In ...

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(bJackson, MS, Sept 25, 1908; dChicago, Nov 19, 1972). Americantrumpeter. He grew up in Chicago, where he played with the trombonist Hugh Swift (1925), Dave Peyton and Doc Cook (both 1927), and Clifford “Klarinet” King (1928...

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Bob Zieff and Howard Rye

(bNashville, Dec 15, 1897; dNew York, Jan 28, 1974). Americantrumpeter. He took up piano and cornet as a youth in St. Louis. After some early professional work in Seattle (1916) he played frequently on Mississippi riverboats, both under Charlie Creath and as the leader of his own band on the SS ...

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Kevin Whitehead

(b Milwaukee, July 12, 1957). American trumpeter, brother of Carl Allen. He sang in rhythm-and-blues vocal groups from the ages of five to 11, learned guitar from ages 11 to 13, and then took up trumpet, which he played in rhythm-and-blues groups from the time he was 15. Later he studied theory and jazz piano at the Wisconsin Conservatory in Milwaukee and the University of Wisconsin in Green Bay. In ...

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Virginia Allen

(b Morgan, TX, June 13, 1927). American conductor, composer, arranger, and trumpeter. Allen began trumpet lessons at age seven with his father, a 50-year Texas school band director, and later studied with Jimmy Burke of the Goldman Band and Lloyd Geisler of the National SO. During 45 years of military service, he conducted US Army bands, including the 101st Airborne Division Band. His career culminated with his appointment as Leader and Commander of The United States Army Band (Pershing’s Own) in Washington, DC, ...

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(bLaCrosse, WI, July 25, 1905). Americansaxophonist and clarinetist. In 1926 he went to New York with Lloyd Scott’s band and the following year he performed and recorded there with Scott and his brother Cecil. He then joined Leon Abbey, with whom he traveled to Europe and made recordings in England (...