1,221-1,240 of 57,904 results

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Anya Laurence

(bc1930). American violinist. He began his studies at the age of seven and entered the Juilliard School of Music three years later. He completed his formal studies with Vera Fonaroff at the Mannes College of Music. In 1962, he was the first African American musician to become a regular member of the New York PO. He has appeared as a soloist with the Baltimore, Detroit, and Quebec symphony orchestras, and the New York Philharmonic. In ...

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H.C. Colles and Malcolm Turner

(b Reading, Dec 23, 1869; d Oxford, Feb 20, 1946). English organist, conductor and musical administrator. As a student at Cambridge he laid the foundation of his reputation as a conductor of Bach by his performances of the cantatas in his college chapel. Subsequently he held appointments as organist of St Asaph’s Cathedral (...

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Mark Tucker

(b New York, NY, Dec 16, 1921; d Encino, CA, Oct 30, 2000). American composer, radio and television personality, pianist, singer, and comedian. The son of Belle Montrose and Billy Allen, both of whom worked in vaudeville, he moved from place to place as a child, attending many schools for short periods of time. He played piano from an early age, although his musical training was mainly informal. He began a professional career in Los Angeles as a disc jockey on radio during the 1940s, then turned to television in the 1950s; he established himself as a comedian, and often played the piano during his shows, improvising jazz and singing his own songs. Among the musicians who appeared with him regularly was the vibraphonist Terry Gibbs. Allen’s most popular television program was “The Tonight Show,” which he began broadcasting locally in New York in ...

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Daniel Zager and Barry Kernfeld

(bNew York, Nov 2, 1920; dPoint Pleasant, NJ, Dec 23, 1974). Americanwriter. He studied geology at Columbia University (BS 1942), served as a navigator in the army air corps, and then returned to Columbia, where he gained a master's degree in mineralogy. Although an engineer by profession (PhD, Rutgers, ...

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English piano maker. He was co-inventor with James Thom of the Compensation frame, patented in 1820. See Pianoforte, §I, 6.

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Robert Paul Kolt

(b Portland, OR, Dec 15, 1906; d Richmond, CA, Aug 19, 1999). American pianist, organist, accompanist, educator, and critic. After childhood training in piano and organ, Allen received his formal music education at the Oberlin College Conservatory of Music, OH, (BM, 1928, MM ...

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Renee Lapp Norris

(b Northborough, MA, Sept 5, 1830; d Madison, WI, Dec 9, 1889). American classical scholar, teacher, editor, and writer. Allen is best known musically as an editor of Slave Songs of the United States (New York, 1867), also edited by Charles Pickard Ware and Lucy McKim Garrison, who were white collectors of black music....

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Juan Orrego-Salas

(b Santiago, June 29, 1885; d Santiago, Aug 17, 1959). Chilean composer and ethnomusicologist. He studied the violin, music theory and composition at the Santiago Conservatorio National de Música (1899–1908). The Chilean government then sent him to France and Spain for further study (...

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Klaus Linder

(b Santiago, Feb 24, 1928). Chilean composer. His mother, Rebeca Blin, was a teacher at the Conservatory of the State University in Santiago, and his father, Adolfo Allende-Saron, was a composer, choirmaster and critic. He studied with his uncle Pedro Humberto Allende and (...

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Margaret Campbell

(b New York, May 20, 1917; d Los Angeles, Oct 12, 1995). American cellist of Russian parentage. She studied with her father, and at the age of 12 appeared at Carnegie Hall. She subsequently studied with Felix Salmond at the Juilliard School of Music, and toured as a soloist. In ...

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Bruce Tychinski

(b Detroit, MI, Sept 9, 1959).

American trombonist. Widely regarded as one of the finest trombonists of the later 20th and the 21st centuries, Joseph Alessi began his studies with his father in San Rafael, California prior to enrolling at the Curtis Institute of Music from ...

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Laurence Libin

(fl Munich, Germany, c1698–c1738). German luthier. Many labels identify him as a lute and violin maker to the Bavarian court. His extensive output encompasses a wide range of instruments including members of the violin family (including a tenor violin, 1735), viols, tromba marinas (two known, dated 1732 and 1737), and, especially noteworthy, large violas d’amore with elaborate outlines and nicely carved heads. His craftsmanship and materials are of high quality and his work is represented in many collections, but little reliable information has been found regarding his origin, training, and career. Some sources place his birth in Waltenhofen, ...

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(b Piacenza or Cremona, 1603/4; d Piacenza, July 18, 1670). Italian composer. The date of his death is usually incorrectly given as 1668. Although little is known of his life, it is certain that the invariable addition to his name of the word ‘Piacenza’ indicates his complete identification with the city where he worked and probably was born (though his inclusion in Giuseppe Bresciani's ...

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Barbara Owen

(b Kennebunk, ME, March 4, 1804; d Newburyport, MA, March 8, 1880). American organ builder. He is said to have learnt about organbuilding from a Dr Furbush in Kennebunk, and began making reed organs at the age of 18. In 1826 he moved to Newburyport, where he eventually built 37 church organs, the largest in ...

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Barry Kernfeld

(bWinnemucca, NV, May 26, 1915; dSan Francisco, Oct 3, 2004). Americandouble bass player. He grew up in San Francisco, played clarinet through his primary and high-school years, and took up double bass while at Sacramento Junior College. At the beginning of the 1940s he performed and made recordings with Lionel Hampton on double bass and electric bass guitar (...

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German musical organization. Established in 1861 in Weimar and dedicated to the promotion of new music (primarily through performance), the Allgemeiner Deutscher Musikverein (ADMV) was the first national music society in Germany. Focal points of its activity were the annual festivals that took place in alternating German and German-speaking cities and initially featured the music of Liszt and his colleagues in the ‘New German’ movement. During its first decade the ADMV gave premières of music by such composers as Wagner, Liszt, Cornelius and Felix Draeseke. Liszt provided the society with artistic leadership but, as president, Franz Brendel was the chief guiding spirit during its early years. Upon Brendel’s death in ...

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(b Calcutta, April 16, 1920; d Täby, Sept 18, 1990). Swedish composer. He left grammar school before completing his studies and studied the viola and counterpoint at the Swedish Royal Academy of Music in Stockholm. A self-taught composer, in the 1940s he was a member of the Monday Group, which included Bäck, Lidholm and Blomdahl. Following his conversion to Catholicism in ...

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A British society founded in 1993 by the Composers' Guild of Great Britain, the Association of Professional Composers and the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers and Authors.

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Andra McCartney

(b Toronto, Feb 6, 1952). Canadian composer. She earned the BMus (1975) from the University of Toronto, the MFA (1977) from Princeton University and the DMA (1982) from the University of Southern California. Her teachers included John Weinzweig, Gustav Ciamaga, Nadia Boulanger and Oscar Peterson at the University of Tornto and Milton Babbitt and Claudio Spies at Princeton. After teaching at the Royal Conservatory and the University of Western Ontario, she began teaching at Queen’s University (Kingston) in ...

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Alan Blyth

(b Ashton-under-Lyne, Nov 19, 1884; d Hereford, Oct 27, 1973). English bass. He studied at the RMCM (1906–10), intending to become a teacher, but after marrying the mezzo-soprano Edith Clegg took up performing. He made his concert début in Manchester and his stage début in ...