1,341-1,360 of 1,366 results  for:

  • Music Manager or Administrator x
Clear all

Article

David J. Hough

(b Waco, TX, Oct 4, 1941). American designer, playwright and director. He was educated at the University of Texas (1959–62), studied painting and graduated in architecture from the Pratt Institute, Brooklyn (1965). He began writing plays and directing in New York in the 1960s, winning critical acclaim especially in Europe. His own ...

Article

Michael Kennedy

(b Clifton, July 22, 1889; d Petersfield, Dec 18, 1966). English tenor and administrator . He had music lessons from C.B. Rootham at Cambridge University, 1908–11, and in 1911 he sang Vaughan Williams’s On Wenlock Edge for the Oxford University Music Club, so pleasing the composer that he wrote his ...

Article

Harold Rosenthal and Alan Blyth

(b Annemasse, Switzerland, June 26, 1914; d Stuttgart, 5 or Sept 8, 1974). German tenor and director . He studied in Stuttgart with his father, the tenor Fritz Windgassen, and Alfons Fischer. In 1941 he made his début at Pforzheim as Don Alvaro (...

Article

(b Waldenburg, Feb 9, 1775; d Dresden, Sept 24, 1856). German poet, impresario and journalist. The son of Gottfried Winkler (archdeacon at Waldenburg and from 1779 deacon at the Dresden Kreuzkirche), he displayed a versatility and diligence in Dresden as lawyer, author and critic, translator and editor, and musical and theatrical organizer. He was the mentor of Friedrich Kind's Liederkreis, assistant director of the court theatre and founder-editor of the ...

Article

Jonas Westover

(b Michigan, 1949). American composer, pianist, producer, and guitarist. He is best known for his evocative and introspective solo piano works. He often draws on nature for his picturesque titles, perhaps responding to his time in the Midwest and areas such as eastern Montana. He did not receive any formal training, but instead learned to play the organ by ear in ...

Article

Teresa Chylińska

(b Kraków, 1523; d Kraków, 15–17 June 1605). Polish printer and bookseller active in Kraków. He was probably a pupil of Florian Ungler. For the high standards of his publications (which equal those of Januszowski), Wirzbięta received the title ‘Sacrae Maiestatis Regiae chalcographus’. A Calvinist, he became the principal printer for the Reformation in Poland. He published much music, almost entirely consisting of songbooks in which Protestant solo songs are well represented. In Walenty z Brzozowa's ...

Article

Philip L. Miller

(b Buffalo, NY, July 21, 1873; d New York, May 10, 1935). American bass, teacher and music administrator . At Yale University he studied both art and music; his teachers included Horatio Parker in composition and Gustav Stoeckel in singing. He continued his studies with MacDowell, among others, and later studied in Paris, London and Berlin. In ...

Article

Jere T. Humphreys

(b Akron, IA, Sept 18, 1937). American music educator and administrator. She received degrees in music education from Morningside College, Iowa (BME 1959) and the University of Michigan (MM 1975, PhD 1978). She taught and served as acting dean and associate dean of music at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music (...

Article

Friedrich Baser and Rudolf Walter

(b Schwarzenbach am Wald, Upper Franconia, Dec 17, 1854; d Samaden, Grisons, May 8, 1919). German conductor, concert organizer, teacher and composer. He became an elementary teacher at the Altdorf teachers' seminary. In 1875 he was appointed second music teacher at the Bamberg teacher's seminary. He then studied in Munich at the Königliche Musikschule with Rheinberger and Franz Wüllner. Humperdinck was a fellow pupil, and they became lifelong friends. Wolfrum returned to the Bamberg seminary from ...

Article

James Doering

(b Alzey, Germany, 1842; d New York, NY, May 31, 1909). American music manager of German origin. His family immigrated to the United States in 1851 and settled in New York City, where he later attended City College. After graduating from college, Wolfsohn had aspirations of a musical career and studied briefly with the conductor Theodore Thomas and the composer William Mason. His interest in music management began in the 1870s and focused initially on traveling opera troupes. In ...

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

(b ?San Francisco, 1957). American tenor saxophonist, violinist, record producer, and leader. He first played violin but took up alto saxophone after hearing recordings by Charlie Parker. From 1975 he attended Stanford University, where he initially studied chemistry; while there he met future collaborators in Jon Jang and Glenn Horiuchi and changed to the tenor instrument, on which he was influenced by the music of John Coltrane and Sonny Rollins. He then studied jazz at San Jose State University, and later he graduated from Stanford with a degree in economics (...

Article

J.M. Schlitz

(b Waterloo, NY, Jan 1872; d Los Angeles, CA, 1938). American Whistler and founder of a school of whistling. She grew up in Tecumseh, Michigan, and studied voice at the Detroit Conservatory. She later sang and taught locally until overstraining her voice. At age 30 she, her mother, and her aunts moved to California, where, after modeling certain bird species in the Sierras, Woodward began performing as a whistler. With the earlier successes of alice j. Shaw still fresh in the public’s mind, Woodward attracted many female students, and in ...

Article

Cynthia Adams Hoover

(b Potsdam, Germany, Nov 15, 1855; d Washington, DC, Nov 14, 1938). American collector of and dealer in keyboard instruments. His father, Christian, had a music business in Trenton, New Jersey, from c1858 to 1861, and in Washington from 1863 to 1868...

Article

John Bourgeois

(b London, UK, June 23, 1916). American band director, conductor, and educator of English birth. He immigrated to the US in 1923 and studied at the University of Miami (BA 1937, MEd 1947). He was instrumental in founding many band organizations including the Florida Bandmasters Association and the National Bandmasters Association. He led the Miami Senior High School (...

Article

Edward H. Tarr

(b Brunswick, Aug 28, 1826; d St Petersburg, 25 May/June 7, 1904). German cornet player, composer and band director. His first musical training was with his father, bandmaster of the Black Hussars of the Grand Duke of Braunschweig. At the age of 21 he moved to St Petersburg, where he was ‘Soloist of the Imperial Theatre Orchestra’ from ...

Article

David Scott

(b Northwich, Cheshire, May 17, 1912; d York, May 9, 2004). English writer on music and music educationist . He was educated at Christ’s Hospital (1924–30) and read English, music and history as an organ scholar at Selwyn College, Cambridge (1930–34...

Article

Patrick J. Smith

(b New York, Aug 24, 1956). American director. After graduating from Colgate University she studied with Ponnelle, with whom she collaborated on Rossini’s L’occasione fa il ladro (1987, Pesaro, repeated at La Scala in 1989). From 1985 to 1990 she was co-artistic director of the Skylight Opera Theater in Milwaukee, where she directed the American première of Stephen Oliver’s ...

Article

Leah G. Weinberg

(b Exeter, NH, Nov 8, 1961). American Musician, songwriter, record company founder, and author. Zanes was raised near Concord, New Hampshire, and after attending Oberlin College for one year, moved to Boston. There, Zanes, his brother Warren, the bass player Tom Lloyd, and the drummer Steve Morrell formed the Del Fuegos. The roots-rock band produced five albums between ...

Article

Andrew Lamb

(b Magdeburg, Feb 11, 1829; d Vienna, March 17, 1895). Austrian librettist and theatre director. At 16 he joined his father’s lithographic company in Budapest, and in 1847 he attended the Wiener Akademie der bildenden Künste. During the civil war of 1848–9 he joined a Tyrolean regiment, became an officer, and in ...

Article

Ann Van Der Merwe

(b Chicago, IL, March 21, 1867; d New York, NY, July 22, 1932). American theatrical producer. He was one of the most prolific and influential producers in the history of American musical theater. Ziegfeld began his career recruiting musicians for the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago on behalf of his father. He soon found himself drawn to the world of popular entertainment rather than classical music, however, and spent the next few years promoting various types of acts, ranging from strongman Eugene Sandow to the infamous dancing ducks of Denmark. By the late 1890s, Ziegfeld had moved from vaudeville and variety to the Broadway stage and was producing musical comedies for ...