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Nicholas Shackleton

A member of the clarinet family (see Clarinet, §II, 1), normally pitched in E♭ (it is classified as an aerophone). It is used chiefly in military bands and wind bands, and is usually built with an upturned metal bell and a curved metal crook; the two-piece body carries a mechanism of similar design and layout to that of the soprano clarinet, with two common exceptions. First, because the tone-holes are a little large for convenient covering, the instrument is frequently made with tone-holes covered by plates instead of directly by the fingers; second, there are commonly two speaker keys, as on the bass clarinet....

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A flute pitched in G, a 4th below the concert flute. See Flute, §II, 3, (iv).

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American term for a valved brass instrument pitched in E♭ below the cornet and employed in some wind bands; its form is upright, often with the bell turned forward. It is equivalent to the English Tenor horn.

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The alto instrument of the saxophone family, pitched in E♭; the compass of the standard instrument is d a ♭″, though many alto saxophones have a key for concert a″. See Saxophone, §3.

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Altoboe  

Tenor oboe in F. It has an english horn body and a clarinet bell and was conceived by Wagner. See Oboe, §III, 4, (v).

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Claude Conyers

(b Bennington, VT, Jan 28, 1897; d Los Angeles, June 12, 1957). American choreographer and musical theater director. He fell in love with show business at an early age. When his hopes of becoming a circus contortionist were dashed by his parents, he began seriously studying dance and eventually made his professional début with Mikhail Mordkin’s ballet company. He spent the early 1920s dancing in Broadway musicals and on the vaudeville stage in a duo act with his wife. When she left to have a baby, he began staging dance numbers for a St. Louis movie theater and teaching dance in a local school....

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Altsax  

Record company and label formed in 1972 by Noah Howard.

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David Wild and Barry Kernfeld

(b New York, Jan 06, 1943). American drummer. He took up drums at the age of 11, and after initially teaching himself he studied from 1960 with Charli Persip. In 1964 he met Paul Bley, with whom he worked regularly until 1970 and occasionally thereafter; at the same time he was a member of the Jazz Composers Guild and the Jazz Composer’s Orchestra Association (...

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(b Los Angeles, Dec 27, 1945). American tenor saxophonist. After attending California State University, Los Angeles (1963–7), he toured with Stan Kenton (1967–9), with whom he also recorded (Stan Kenton Conducts the Jazz Compositions of Dee Barton, 1967...

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Altus  

Owen Jander

A voice designation that originated in the mid-15th century as an abbreviation of Contratenor altus. In the early 16th century ‘altus’ and ‘contratenor’ were used interchangeably as designations for a voice lying below the superius (or cantus) and overlapping, more or less, with the tenor. As inner voices became more clearly stratified in range ‘altus’ (or ‘alto’) became the more common term, and during the second half of the 16th century ‘contratenor’ fell into disuse on the Continent. In England the terms ‘contra’ and ‘countertenor’ persisted well into the 17th century. Since World War II the term ‘countertenor’ has been revived in England to designate adult male voices in the alto range, but elsewhere the term ‘altus’ is often preferred....

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Paula J. Bishop

(b Lahaina, HI, 7 Oct, 1911; d Honolulu, HI, Oct 4, 2001). Hawaiian songwriter and performer. She was largely self-taught as a musician but was nurtured by a large family of active and well-known musicians. She played guitar, ukulele, bass, and piano. She began performing professionally while still a teenager, and continued playing and singing until near her death. She wrote her first songs in ...

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Aluti  

Side-blown animal horn of the Teso people of Uganda. The name aluti is attributed to the Mbale district, aluut to the Usuku area. The aluut is blown to summon assemblies and on ceremonial occasions. In regions adjoining Karamoja it is used by herdboys to scare away hyenas....

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(d ?Seville, before Sept 4, 1504). Spanish maestro de capilla. He may be identifiable with Alonso de Alba.

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Harold Rosenthal

(b Lima, April 10, 1927). Peruvian tenor. He studied in Lima with Rosa Morales and in Milan with Emilio Ghirardini and Ettore Campogalliani. He made his début in 1949 in Luisa Fernanda at Lima, where he sang Beppe (Pagliacci) the following year. His European début was at the Teatro Nuovo, Milan, in ...

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Robert Stevenson

(b c1570; d Lisbon, Feb 12, 1643). Basque organist and composer. He had already been in the service of the Spanish crown for some time when on 13 April 1602 he became organist of the royal chapel at Lisbon, with the modest annual salary of 30,000 reis and (from 13 June) three ...

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Gerard Béhague

(b Varginha, Dec 6, 1911; d São Paolo, Feb 23, 1984). Brazilian folklorist and musicologist. At the São Paulo Conservatory of Drama and Music, Mário de Andrade directed her towards the study of Brazilian folk and popular musical traditions; she also studied ethnography and folklore with Dina Lévi-Strauss (...

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Elizabeth Forbes

(b Rio de Janeiro, June 10, 1947). Brazilian tenor . He studied in Rio, Rome and Vienna, making his début in 1970 at Linz as Don José. He has appeared in Vienna, Munich, Oslo and Rio, as the Duke, Alfredo, Gabriele Adorno, Don Carlos, Don Alvaro, Faust, Werther and Lensky. At Wexford he sang Konrad in ...

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Olavo Alén Rodriguez

(b Santa Isabel de Las Lajas, Cuba, March 15, 1938). Cuban composer. He began studying music in Santa Clara and by 1955 had acquired a basic musical education there. In 1956 he moved to the USA, where he continued his studies at the Hartt School in Hartford, Connecticut, and (...

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Ricardo Miranda Pérez

(b Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Nov 16, 1953). Mexican composer. He began his guitar studies in 1971 with Guillermo Flores and in 1977 had classes with Brouwer. He also took various composition courses at the National School of Music and the National Conservatory, where he studied with Eduardo Mata and Rodolfo Halffter....

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Elizabeth Forbes

(b nr Bordeaux, Jan 16, 1861; d Nice, Feb 26, 1933). French tenor . He studied in Paris and made his début in 1886 at Ghent as Gounod’s Faust. From 1892 until 1906 he was engaged at the Opéra, where he created Nicias in Massenet’s ...