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(d before Jan 29, 1557). Composer, described by Eitner as French. He became an alto in the Viennese Hofkapelle in March 1554. An Adrianus de Bachy, listed as a singer in the boys' choir of the court, may have been his son. Bacchius's works are typical polyphonic compositions of his time. The motets, most of which appeared in the large anthologies of Berg & Neuber, are in the full-voiced imitative style much favoured in Vienna. The two chansons have their roots in the Parisian style of the earlier part of the century, although they, too, have a higher level of imitative writing....

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Patricia Ann Myers

(b Mantua, c1550; d Verona, 1609). Italian composer. Although he was a prolific composer of madrigals and sacred music, the course of his career is not well documented. His earliest position appears to have been that of assistant choir director at S Marco, Venice. That he must have held the post for only a short time can be established from a letter (in ...

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Christoph Wolff, Walter Emery, Peter Wollny, Ulrich Leisinger and Stephen Roe

German family of musicians. From the 16th century to the 19th the extensive Saxon-Thuringian Bach family produced an unparalleled and almost incalculable number of musicians of every kind, from fiddlers and town musicians to organists, Kantors, court musicians and Kapellmeisters. The outstanding figure among them was Johann Sebastian Bach, but a great many other well-known and distinguished musicians were born into earlier, contemporary and later generations of the family....

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Emilio Ros-Fábregas

(b Ecija, province of Seville, c1460; d after 1524). Spanish poet, vihuelist and composer. He was one of the leading Castilian poets of the generation of Juan del Encina; one of his poems received a response by Pedro de Cartagena, who died in ...

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Isabel Pope and Tess Knighton

(b Segovia; fl 1476–c1506). Spanish composer. He was appointed ‘player [of the organ] and singer of the chapel’ of Ferdinand of Aragon on 15 April 1478 and served the king until at least 1482. By 1495 he was being paid as a member of the Castilian household as organist of the royal chapel, but after Isabella's death in ...

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Tess Knighton

( b ?Seville, c 1476–80; d ?Lisbon, after 1540). Spanish composer . A number of musicians by the name of Baena were employed in the Castilian, Aragonese and Portuguese royal chapels in the latter part of the 15th century and first half of the 16th. At least three families or clans can be identified: from Valladolid (the royal singer Alonso de Baena and his son Bernaldino), Segovia (...

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(b ?Louvain, c1525; d ?Düsseldorf, after 1557). South Netherlandish printer. His publications are important in the history of music printing in the Low Countries. From 1545 to 1551 he worked at Louvain, probably as a university printer. Besides music, he printed mainly official documents and religious commentaries, of which a number were published by M. Rotaire and ...

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(fl Venice, 1570–79). Italian harpsichord and virginal maker. Although many antique instruments were fraudulently given Baffo’s name, his genuine, signed work comprises only three harpsichords and one virginal. Two further harpsichords and five polygonal virginals may also be identified as his work (see Wraight), one of which is the so-called ‘Queen Elizabeth’s Virginal’ (Victoria and Albert Museum, London; ...

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Mariangela Donà

(b Milan, c1575; d Milan, 1608). Italian composer. He was organist of S Maria della Scala, Milan, and was a pupil of Guglielmo Arnone. At the end of his Liber primus et opus secundum sacrarum cantionum, published by his father Francesco soon after his death and dedicated in ...

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Frank Dobbins

(b Venice, Feb 19, 1532; d Paris, Sept 19, 1589). French poet. He was the illegitimate son of Lazare de Baïf (c 1496–1547), a humanist and translator who served as François I's ambassador to Venice between 1529 and 1534. He studied Latin and Greek under Charles Estienne and Jacques Toussaint (...

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(b Brassó [Kronstadt], Transylvania [now Braşov, Romania], 1526–30; d Padua, Aug 22, 1576). Hungarian lutenist and composer. His biography, formerly founded on inadequate documentation and misconstruction of available facts, has been badly distorted; more recently discovered evidence and reinterpretation of received data allow a far more accurate story to be given. Bakfark’s family belonged to the German minority in Transylvania; the Hungarian form ‘Bálint’ for his Christian name, common in modern scholarship, is not found in contemporaneous sources. From ...

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Giancarlo Rostirolla

(b Venice, c1545; d Venice, before Dec 15, 1604). Italian composer and friar. He entered the monastery of S Maria Gloriosa dei Frari, Venice, as a member of the order of Minor Conventuals. From 1565 to 1567 he was a pupil in Padua of Costanzo Porta, who belonged to the same religious order. From ...

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(b before 1560; d London, Aug 28, 1615). English singer, composer and music copyist. He was appointed a tenor lay clerk at St George’s Chapel, Windsor, in 1575. He became a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal on 20 August 1598, and appears to have left Windsor by ...

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Jeanette B. Holland and Arthur J. Ness

(fl Piacenza, 1554). Italian lutenist and composer. He is known only from his lutebook Intabolatura de lauto … di varie sorte de balli … libro primo (Venice, 1554; ed. G. Lefkoff, Five Sixteenth Century Venetian Lute Books, Washington DC, 1960). The dedication to Conte Honorio Scotto was signed in Piacenza. Most of the 14 pieces in the volume are familiar Italian dance forms: there are two paduana and saltarello pairs, a work based on the romanesca (...

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Leland Earl Bartholomew and Franco Colussi

(b ?Crema; d Ceneda, March 24, 1616). Italian composer, singer and priest. He had been appointed priest and contralto singer at Padua Cathedral on 5 May 1577 and he served there for more than 20 years in various capacities. He was an unsuccessful candidate for the post of ...

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Lorenzo Bianconi and Andrea Chegai

(b Urbino; fl 1591–6; d ?Venice, ?1607). Italian composer, poet and instrument inventor. A connection with Urbino is suggested by the dedications to the Della Rovere family of his two surviving publications; his book of madrigals further includes a preface addressed to ‘miei Signori & Patriotti’ of Urbino. He was ...

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Arnold Geering

(b Correggio, nr Reggio Emilia; fl 1557–61). Swiss composer of Italian birth. He was Kantor at Locarno in 1557 and then made a journey to south Germany to visit certain scholars, among them the brothers Johann (Hans) Jakob and Georg Fugger at Augsburg. At Freiburg he probably also met Glarean, and at Augsburg may have met Andreas Schillen, tutor to the Fugger children. In ...

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Pier Paolo Scattolin

(fl Padua, 1583–7). Italian amateur music editor and composer. He lived at Padua, where the only definite reference to him concerns his loan of a portative organ to the cathedral cappella on 6 December 1583. He edited the important anthology De floridi virtuosi d’Italia...

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Frank Dobbins

Flemish family of musicians.

(d Antwerp, Dec 2, 1564). Composer. He was maître de chapelle of St Jacob, Bruges, before his appointment (1528) as maître de musique of the choir school of Antwerp Cathedral, where he remained until 1562. After his wife's death in about ...

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Arthur J. Ness

(fl Padua, c1545–50). Italian priest, composer, lutenist and guitarist. He composed or intabulated books 4, 5, 6, 9 and 10 in Girolamo Scotto’s ten volume series of lute tablatures (Venice, 1546–9), which also included tablatures by Francesco da Milano, Rotta, Giovanni Maria da Crema and Borrono. Barberiis’s name is absent from lists of prominent Paduan musicians of the time, and only two of his pieces were reprinted in later collections. At best, his five books preserve the practical repertory of a ‘sonatore eccellentissimo di lautto’ who had little or no formal musical training....