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Michael Talbot and Enrico Careri

(b Ferrara, c1690; d Recanati, Feb 25, 1757). Italian composer. Ferrara is cited as his birthplace in the Serie cronologica de' principi dell'Accademia de' filarmonici di Bologna, but archival documents in Udine and Recanati suggest Mantua. On 15 April 1715, when in Verona, Bellinzani was appointed ...

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Jean Lionnet

( b Rome; d Rome, c1748). Italian composer , probably the son of Pietro Paolo Bencini . Few details of his career in Rome are known; his position in 1742 as maestro di cappella of S Lorenzo in Damaso, in particular, is uncertain. The success which his music enjoyed is apparent from the number of copies of his works which survive in church archives in Rome, for example in S Maria in Trastevere, S Giovanni in Laterano and S Pietro (Cappella Giulia). However, the attributions are not always reliable: in the Cappella Giulia collection, for example, two copies of the same ...

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Hans Joachim Marx

( fl 1723–7). Italian composer . In 1727 he served as virtuoso da camera to the Grand Duke of Tuscany in Florence. His sole surviving works are four cantatas for solo soprano and instruments: Fileno, April s'intorn, Qual dispera tortorella, Impara a non temer and ...

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Jean Lionnet

( b ?Rome, c1670; d Rome, July 6, 1755). Italian composer . In 1690 he appeared for the first time at the general assembly of the Compagnia dei Musici di Roma, when he would have been between 18 and 20 years old. Several copies of his cantatas are dated ...

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(b Quedlinburg, 1683; d Brunswick, 1724). German bass, son of the theorist J.P. Bendeler, who taught him. He is said to have enjoyed great success in north Italy and throughout Germany; he sang at Weissenfels and Brunswick (1708), Hamburg, Leipzig and Danzig. In ...

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Caterina Pampaloni

(b Assisi, bap. Dec 12, 1683; d Assisi, bur. July 2, 1749). Italian composer and priest. Baptized Giovanni Domenico Antonio, he took the name Francesco Maria when he entered the Franciscan order as a novice on 25 November 1699. He served for two and a half months in the chapel of the basilica of S Francesco, Assisi, before moving to Città di Castello on ...

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Carolyn Gianturco

(b Lucca, c1700; d Lucca, after 1760). Italian composer. He was maestro di cappella of the royal and archducal chapel in Mantua (as a collection of his psalm settings from 1742 testifies). According to Nerici he published while at Mantua a concerted four-part mass and vespers in honour of Filippo Neri; his only extant mass and vespers (manuscript at Lucca) is probably the same work. Although a large instrumental force (violin concertante, oboe, first and second violins, viola, cello, double bass and organ) accompanies a double four-part choir, the results are not exciting; contrapuntal effects are achieved only as a result of the homophonic choirs and homophonic instruments not moving rhythmically together. His six ...

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Mary Cyr

(b Lunel, 1710; d Paris, Dec 1, 1772). French haute-contre singer, music teacher, cellist and composer. His début in 1733 at the Paris Opéra, according to La Borde, was in the monologue of Pélée, ‘Ciel! en voyant ce temple redoutable’ from Act 3 of Collasse's ...

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Alexander Lingas

(b Constantinople, ?1665; d ?1725). Romaic (Greek) composer and cantor. Though undoubtedly influenced by the works of Panagiotes, Germanos and Balasios, he appears never to have been directly associated with the patriarchal court that nurtured his older colleagues. His own substantial contributions to their continuing renewal of Byzantine chanting were made instead from the Constantinopolitan parish church of St Constantine (in the district of Hypsomatheia), where Bereketes held successively the offices of reader, ...

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(b Lyons, Dec 12, 1690; d Lyons, before April 27, 1768). French composer and co-founder of a concert academy in 18th-century Lyons. The son of Antoine Bergiron (1654–1731), advocate of the Paris Parlement and one of Louis XIV's hunting organizers, he studied classics and law, matriculating at the University of Paris in ...

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Robert Münster and Paul Corneilson

(b Marseilles, 1706; d Munich, Jan 24, 1784). Italian composer. Early sources state that he was born in 1712. His father, a French officer, settled in Parma after his withdrawal from military service. Little is known of Bernasconi’s education. In the librettos of his early operas he is referred to as a Milanese dilettante (...

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Jean-Paul Montagnier

(b Mantes-la-Jolie, 5/June 6, 1665; d Paris, July 6, 1734). French composer, harpsichordist, theorist and teacher. He probably learnt music in the maîtrise of the collegiate church of Notre Dame, Mantes, and in that of Evreux Cathedral. According to the Etat actuel de la Musique du Roi...

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Winton Dean

(fl 1708–21). Italian soprano castrato. He was apparently Venetian; he sang in six operas in Venice (1708–9), including works by Gasparini and Albinoni, in Bologna (1712), Reggio nell’Emilia (1713 and 1719), Rome (1714 in Gasparini’s Lucio Papirio...

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Michael Talbot

(b Bologna, April 8, 1666; d Bologna, March 30, 1747). Italian composer and pedagogue. Having received his initial musical training in Bologna, he was employed as a singer in Rome between 1687 and 1690, attached to the choirs of S Luigi dei Francesi and S Agostino. Returning to Bologna, he was appointed singing master at the Scuole Pie in ...

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(b 1708; d Angers, Jan 23, 1771). French cellist. He was the founder of the French school of cello playing. Among his pupils were Tillière, Janson, Cupis and the elder Duport. He began by playing the bass viol, studying in Germany with Kozecz, the Bohemian performer on that instrument. After hearing the Italian cellist Francischello he gave up the viol for the cello. In ...

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Jérôme de La Gorce

(b Paris, c1680; d Paris, March 6, 1743). French composer. Generally known incorrectly by the first name of Thomas, he was the son of a Parisian master carpenter, Jacques Ladoué; in 1705, the year of his marriage, he is recorded as teaching the harpsichord and ‘other instruments’. The following year his first dramatic work, ...

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Winton Dean

(b Rome; d Bologna, Jan 9, 1767). Italian contralto. In 1728 she was in the service of the Grand Duchess of Tuscany and sang in two operas in Bologna and two in Livorno. Handel engaged her for the second Royal Academy at the King's Theatre (...

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John Bergsagel

(b Helmershausen, June 19, 1668; d Christiania, Sept 14, 1743). Norwegian military officer and composer of German birth. Originally a titled family in Brabant, Bertouch’s forebears emigrated for religious reasons to Germany, where his father, Jacob, was a teacher. At the age of 15 he studied the violin and composition with Eberlin, after which he proceeded to university. He matriculated at both Jena (...

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Mary Cyr

(fl Paris, c1687; d cNov 10, 1725). French string instrument maker. He was one of the best and most prolific of French makers of string instruments and his viols are fine examples of 18th-century craftsmanship. He held the title faiseur d'instrumens ordinaire de la muzique du Roy...

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Elizabeth Keitel and Bernard Bardet

(b c1689; d Versailles, Aug 22, 1765). French violinist, musette player, flautist and composer. He may have been related to the three Bessons of 17th-century Marseilles described as ‘lieutenants du roi des violins’, or to a family of musicians of the same name living in Lyons in the 17th and 18th centuries. In ...