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Article

Manuel Carlos De Brito

(bap. Lisbon, April 16, 1714; d Lisbon, 1782). Portuguese composer of Italian ancestry. He studied with his father, Pietro Giorgio Avondano, a Genoese violinist of the Portuguese royal chapel and a composer, and himself became a violinist in the same chapel; others of his family were also members. His duties as a court musician included composing the music for the ballets which accompanied the operas. He also played the violin, and at his own house in the Rua da Cruz promoted balls and concerts mainly for the foreign communities. Three collections of minuets written for these balls were published in London, at the expense of the British community in Lisbon. He was a Knight of the Order of Christ, an honour purchased for 480,000 réis, and he also played an important role in the reorganization after the ...

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Watkins Shaw and Gerald Gifford

(b ?Chichester, c1730; d London, Feb 27, 1801). English organist and composer, son of Henry Aylward of Chichester. He may have sung as a boy at Drury Lane Theatre in London. His successive appointments were as organist of Oxford Chapel, London, from about ...

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Watkins Shaw

(b Ripon, bap. Nov 19, 1734; d Westminster, London, May 22, 1808). English organist and composer. He was the younger brother of William Ayrton (b Ripon, bap. 18 Dec 1726; d Ripon, 2 Feb 1799), who was organist of Ripon Cathedral from ...

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Barry S. Brook and Carl Moskovic

(b Ladern-sur-Lauquet, nr Carcassonne, April 4, 1741; d Toulouse, March 30, 1796). French composer. He began his musical career as a choirboy at Carcassonne Cathedral where he obtained his musical education. He spent most of his life in the south of France. At the age of 15 he became ...

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Joseph Vella Bondin

( b Rabat, May 5, 1748; d Rabat, Feb 6, 1809). Maltese composer, organist and theorist . After early studies with Michel'Angelo Vella, he entered the Conservatorio di S Onofrio a Capuana on 15 Oct 1763 as a convittore to study under Carlo Contumacci and the German Joseph Doll. He left in ...

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Gloria Eive

Italian family of musicians.

(b Cesena, Nov 16, 1708; d Cesena, Jan 2, 1768). Italian tenor. Active from 1729 to 1760, he was renowned for his powerful voice and wide range (c to c″, full voice; c″ to g″, falsetto), his dramatic and expressive manner and his mastery of the improvised bel canto style. Babbi sang in the major theatres of Italy (notably in Florence, Venice, Rome, Turin, Padua and Naples) and Portugal (Lisbon), in heroic ...

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Elizabeth Forbes

(b Bologna, Feb 19, 1754; d Bologna, Sept 22, 1816). Italian tenor . He studied with Arcangelo Cortoni and made his début in 1773 in Modena. After singing in various Italian cities, he was engaged at the court operas of Berlin and then St Petersburg (...

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Aleš Nagode

(b Vienna, Austria, Sept 19, 1787; d Budapest (Pest), Hungary, 1868). Slovenian composer. He took violin lessons from Pietro Polzelli in Vienna before 1796; there is no data about his further musical education. He was an extraordinarily versatile musician (flute, oboe, clarinet, violin, viola, piano, and organ). Between ...

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Christoph Wolff, Walter Emery, Peter Wollny, Ulrich Leisinger and Stephen Roe

German family of musicians. From the 16th century to the 19th the extensive Saxon-Thuringian Bach family produced an unparalleled and almost incalculable number of musicians of every kind, from fiddlers and town musicians to organists, Kantors, court musicians and Kapellmeisters. The outstanding figure among them was Johann Sebastian Bach, but a great many other well-known and distinguished musicians were born into earlier, contemporary and later generations of the family....

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London concert series organized between 1765 and 1781 by J.C. Bach and C.F. Abel; see London, §V, 2.

Abel: (4) Carl Friedrich Abel

Bach, §III: (12) Johann Christian Bach, §3: Mannheim and London, 1772–82

Symphony, §I, 12: 18th century: London

London (i), §V, 2: Musical life: 1660–1800: Concert life...

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E. Eugene Helm and Martin Elste

(b Berlin, 1748; d Berlin, May 26, 1809). German viol player and instrument maker. He was a viol player in the royal chapel from 1765, and in 1770, together with J.F.E. Benda, he established the Berlin Liebhaberkonzerte. With Benda’s death in 1785 Bachmann succeeded him as director of the concerts; in the same year he married the noted singer and pianist Charlotte Caroline Wilhelmine Stöwe. Throughout this period he also made instruments in the shop of his father, the violin maker and court violinist Anton Bachmann (...

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Eberhard Stiefel

(b Kettershausen, nr Illertissen, July 18, 1754; d Reutlingendorf, nr Ehingen an der Donau, Oct 18, 1825). German composer and keyboard player. A child prodigy, he probably received his earliest instruction in music from his grandfather Franz Joseph Schmöger, choral director and organist in Markt Biberbach. It was there on 5 or ...

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(b Melk, Lower Austria, Feb 11, 1728; d Eichstätt, Dec 29, 1797). German composer and violin virtuoso of Austrian birth. He came from a long line of musicians who emigrated to Melk late in the 17th century from Traunstein, Bavaria. While still a young man he was appointed ...

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Adolf Layer

(b Haigerloch, June 23, 1749; d Ottobeuren, April 10, 1810). South German monastic composer. After studying in Zwiefalten and Ehingen an der Donau, he entered the Benedictine monastery of Ottobeuren in 1771. He was taught music by Ernestus Weinrauch in Zwiefalten and by Franz Schnitzer and Christoph Neubauer in Ottobeuren. He served the monastery as choir leader, music teacher and master of novices. After the suspension of the state endowment to Ottobeuren in ...

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Margaret Cranmer

(d London, Jan 1778). Dutch or German maker of harpsichords and pianos, active in England. He worked at 22 Great Jermyn Street, London, from 1763 to 1778. Writing to the Gentleman’s Magazine in 1812, James Shudi Broadwood attributed the invention of the English grand-piano action to the ‘Dutchman’ Backers in ...

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See Haydn, (Franz) Joseph

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Thomas Bauman

(b Lyck, East Prussia, June 8, 1756; d Königsberg, March 27, 1823). German librettist. At 21, after studying law at Königsberg, he went blind. Thereafter he taught history at an artillery academy and wrote novels, several works on Prussian history and musical texts for local use. Three of his librettos were published in ...

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Olive Baldwin and Thelma Wilson

(b London, ?1745; d Edinburgh, July 1, 1786). English actress and soprano . Daughter of the trumpeter Valentine Snow, she eloped with the actor Robert Baddeley and in 1764 made her début as Ophelia at Drury Lane. Although the prompter Hopkins found her Ophelia ‘very bad, all but the singing’, she made a charming heroine in genteel and Shakespearean comedy. In English operas she was particularly successful as Patty (...

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Curtis Price

(fl 1770–93). Italian librettist and journalist. He was in London by 1769, when he wrote the libretto for Pugnani’s comic opera Nanetta e Lubino. Probably supplementing his income by translating and teaching Italian, Badini wrote a few librettos for the King’s Theatre during the 1770s, including ...

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Roger J.V. Cotte

(b Fockenhof, Kurland, Feb 14, 1722; d Paris, March 24, 1791). French dilettante, amateur violinist and composer, patron of the arts and instrument collector. A magnificent and very wealthy nobleman, he both amused and astounded his contemporaries. M. Audinot in his comic opera ...