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Michael Talbot

In 

See Vivaldi, Antonio

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Peter Ward Jones

(b ?London, c1672; d London, c1732). English music printer, publisher and instrument maker . The researches of Dawe, together with those of Ashbee, have helped clarify the identification of members of this family. Young's father was also John, but since he was still alive in ...

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Milan Poštolka

(b Čelákovice, Bohemia, bap. Nov 13, 1699; d Ellwangen, May 24, 1773). Czech composer and organist. The son of a wheelwright, he went to Prague in 1724 and began his career as a violinist at St Gallus and at St Martín. Later he became organist at St Martín and, by ...

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Carolyn Gianturco

(b Rome, 2nd half of the 17th century; d Pisa, early 18th century). Italian composer . He was noted as a virtuoso on the theorbo, lute, harpsichord, guitar, mandore and mandolin. As such Zamboni, who also seems to have been a jeweller, found employment at Pisa Cathedral. His collection of ...

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(b Verona, c1665; d Verona, Aug 5, 1748). Italian composer. In 1724 he and his son, Girolamo, entered the competition for the post of maestro di cappella of Verona Cathedral. Girolamo was awarded the appointment but conceded it to his father out of respect and took instead the job of teaching ‘figured song’ at the Scuola degli Accoliti in Verona. In ...

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Dale E. Monson

(b Venice, 1706; d Venice, 1778). Italian librettist. He and his brother Girolamo (bc1710; d 1782) were literati with expertise in widely diverse fields; they published extensively on the history of Venetian art, and their commentaries on the history and criticism of painting, sculpture and architecture are widely recognized as both discerning and informed. Antonio served for many years until his death as the curator of the library of S Marco. The brothers collaborated on the libretto for Jommelli’s early Venetian ...

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Michael Talbot

(b Casalmaggiore, nr Cremona, Nov 11, 1696; d Casalmaggiore, Sept 28, 1757). Italian composer and violinist. He was taught the violin by Giacomo Civeri and later by Carlo Ricci. An invitation from Antonio Caldara, who had met him while passing through Casalmaggiore, took him to Vienna, where he became a well-known virtuoso and teacher without, however, obtaining an official position in the service of the imperial court. In ...

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Harris S. Saunders

(b Bologna; d Aug 6, 1767). Italian librettist. A Bolognese nobleman active as poet and orator, he was a member of the Arcadian Academy, in which he used the pseudonym Esterio, and founded his own called the Accademia de’ Nascosti. In addition to at least ten opera librettos for various theatres in Venice and Bologna, he wrote several oratorios and prose translations of a number of French plays, printed variously by Longhi or Pisarri in Bologna between ...

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(b Venice; fl 1710–32). Italian bass . He was for some years in the service of the Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt. His first known appearances were in Padua in 1710 and 1712, and in 1713 he sang at Ferrara in Albinoni’s Lucio Vero. From December 1714...

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Jaak Liivoja-Lorius

(fl c1737–61). Italian violin maker. He probably studied with his father, Giovanni Battista (Johannes Baptista) Zanoli, and left his hometown of Verona to work in Padua (a cello made there, his earliest known instrument, is dated 1737) and Venice (where he registered for jury duty in ...

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(b Hochtann, nr Deutschbrod, Bohemia, April 8, 1708; d ?Mannheim, after 1778). Bohemian composer and violinist. He received his earliest musical instruction from Lukas Lorenz, the Deutschbrod teacher with whom Johann Stamitz is alleged to have studied. Around 1725 he went to Vienna where he studied the violin with F.J. Timmer and J.A. Rosetter and took flute lessons from Biarelli. Zarth then entered the service of Count Pachta at Rajov, but did not remain long in this post; he had formed a friendship with Franz Benda and as both were equally dissatisfied with their positions they left Vienna abruptly in ...

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Anne Schnoebelen

(b Bologna, Aug 9, 1690; d Bologna, Dec 1764). Italian violinist and composer . He studied the violin with Giuseppe Torelli and composition with L.A. Predieri. He achieved considerable fame as a violinist in Livorno, Venice and Ferrara (there is no evidence that, as is sometimes stated, he was a cellist). He became a member of the Accademia Filarmonica di Bologna on ...

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Friedrich W. Riedel and David Wyn Jones

(b Gleisdorf, April 9, 1716; d Stein an der Donau, June 7, 1778). Austrian composer and organist. He held posts as organist at the Benedictine abbey of Göttweig, Lower Austria (1736–43), and choral director of St Veit, Krems an der Donau (...

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Elizabeth Roche

(b Kempten, May 10, 1705; d Füssen, Jan 7, 1755). German composer. He was educated at the monastery schools at Ochsenhausen and Ottobeuren (though there is no evidence that he sang in the choir of either) and at Innsbruck University. In 1721 he entered the Benedictine house of St Mang at Füssen, where his activities were by no means confined to music. As well as being organist for seven years, he taught Latin and Greek in the school, served a nearby parish and administered the monastery's vineyard. After being elected abbot in ...

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Ingmar Bengtsson and Bertil H. van Boer

[den äldre] (b Uppsala, 14 or April 15, 1689; d Stockholm, July 6, 1765). Swedish organist and composer. As one of a family that had come to Sweden from Lüneburg, Germany, in the 17th century, he was a member of the Swedish royal chapel from ...

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Ingmar Bengtsson

(b Stockholm, Sept 3, 1719; d Stockholm, April 21, 1780). Swedish musician and composer, son of Ferdinand Zellbell. He studied with his father and J.H. Roman; in 1741–2 he travelled to Germany and studied with Telemann and others. On his return to Sweden he received, in ...

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Elena Sala Di Felice

(b Venice, Dec 11, 1668; d Venice, Nov 11, 1750). Italian poet, librettist, scholar and antiquarian. He was educated by the Somaschi fathers in the Venetian classical tradition, but was also familiar with the empiricism of Galileo and with rationalism. In 1691 he founded the Accademia degli Animosi, where he became prominent at a very young age as a poet in the late-Baroque mould. Like the more famous Accademia degli Animosi it had as its aim the restoration of Arcadian ‘good taste’. Zeno took part in the debate between G.G. Orsi and Bouhours, defending in a letter to Orsi of ...

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Joshua Rifkin and Konrad Küster

(b Leipzig, bap. June 30, 1695; d Frankfurt an der Oder, May 1, 1760). German poet and cantata librettist . The daughter of a prominent Leipzig family, she began to pursue a professional literary career in her late twenties after she had been widowed twice and lost the children of both marriages. Johann Christoph Gottsched became her mentor and principal sponsor. She published her first collection of verse, ...

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Dieter Härtwig

(b Pulsnitz, Saxony, March 25, 1702; d after 1760). German composer and theorist . He was a son of the Pulsnitz schoolmaster and organist, Johann Gottlieb Ziegler. He learnt music from his father until he was 13; in 1715 he studied at the Halle orphanage, and in ...

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Dieter Härtwig and Peter Wollny

(b Leubnitz, nr Dresden, March 25, 1688; d Halle, Sept 15, 1747). German organist and composer . A member of a large Saxon family of musicians, he had his first instruction from his father Daniel Ziegler, a schoolmaster and organist in Pulsnitz. He then studied under Pezold, organist of the Sophienkirche in Dresden, where he attracted attention as a child prodigy at the court of August II. Later he travelled around Germany, working with various orchestras including the collegium musicum in Halle; it was directed by the well-known pedagogue A.H. Francke, whose pupil he was for nearly three years. In ...