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E. Eugene Helm and Darrell Berg

(b Dobitschen, Saxe-Altenburg, Jan 4, 1720; d Berlin, Dec 2, 1774). German musicographer, composer, organist, singing master and conductor. His father occupied an important post as government agent and jurist in Dobitschen. Burney, who visited the Agricolas in 1772, reported that Johann Friedrich’s mother, born Maria Magdalena Manke, ‘was a near relation of the late Mr Handel, and in correspondence with him till the time of his death’; but later Handel research has failed to substantiate this claim....

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Barbara Chmara-Żackiewicz

(b Pesaro, Nov 30, 1748; d Warsaw, March 27, 1812). Italian composer and conductor, active in Poland. The earliest reference to his activities in Warsaw dates from 12 April 1773, when King Stanisław August Poniatowski paid him a fee for a concert. From the middle of ...

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Howard Serwer

(b Görmar, nr Mühlhausen, Jan 8, 1732; d Mühlhausen, 1773). German writer on music and composer. He was a magister of philosophy, an honorary member of the German Society of Altdorf University, and an imperial poet laureate. His writings include an original work on theory, contributions to the current discussions of Rameau's theories which he favoured, and translations and editions of works of others. In addition, he published an important article on the state of music in Mühlhausen, two in defence of music in the church, and one on the German language. His compositions, consisting largely of sacred vocal works to his own texts, were mostly written for the Marienkirche in Mühlhausen, where he was Kantor and music director. They include a setting of the Passion and a yearly cycle of cantatas (texts published in ...

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Jeffry Mark and Gaynor G. Jones

(b Bamberg, 1763; d Wallerstein, nr Nördlingen, March 29, 1825). German conductor and composer. He studied singing with Fracasini and the violin with Bäuerle at Bamberg. After his voice broke, he studied the horn with Punto, who took him on concert tours in Germany, France and Austria. From ...

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Anneliese Downs and Philippe Vendrix

(b Mannheim, Feb 20, 1734; d Bordeaux, Dec 31, 1809). German composer, conductor, violinist and organist, active in France. He received violin lessons from his father Johann Aloys Beck (d 27 May 1742), an oboist and choir school Rektor at the Palatine court whose name is listed in the calendars of ...

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Alfred Loewenberg

(fl London, 1780–82). Italian conductor and composer. He was music director at the King’s Theatre, London, succeeding Bertoni, for the seasons 1780–81 and 1781–2. He added arias to several pasticcios and, with Rauzzini and Tommaso Giordani, composed L’omaggio di paesani al signore de contado...

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Deanne Arkus Klein

(b Lauterbourg, Alsace (now Bas-Rhin), April 24, 1758; d Versailles, 1829). French conductor, composer and instrumentalist. He received music instruction from his father, Johann Michael Blasius, and from a Herr Stadt, and between 1780 and 1782 was employed by the Bishop of Strasbourg, Prince Louis-René-Edouard de Rohan. He first performed in Paris as a violinist, playing his own concerto at the Concert Spirituel in ...

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Richard Taruskin

(b Austria or Bohemia, 1770; d Kiev, c1812). Russian composer and conductor of Czech birth. In 1799–1800 he was music director at the Petrovsky Theatre, Moscow. Later he entered the service of Count Komburley, provincial governor of Volhynia, where he spent the remainder of his life. In addition to some violin music and two symphonies (op.1, Moscow, ...

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Francesco Bussi

(b Parma, 1734; d Piacenza, c1820). Italian composer, conductor and organist, son of Giuseppe Carcani. He was a pupil of G.B. Martini from 22 August 1754 until 1759, when he was promoted first to maestro compositore of the Accademia Filarmonica of Bologna, then to ...

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Gerard Béhague

(b Villa Rica [now Ouro Prêto], 1763; d Villa Rica, Oct 22, 1823). Brazilian composer, conductor and french horn player, active in the province of Minas Gerais. His father (1746–1806), of the same name, was also a horn player, composer and conductor. Both were members of the Villa Rica Brotherhood of São José dos Homens Pardos (St Joseph’s served the many mulattos in the city); the brotherhood’s records show that the father was a member from ...

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Emmanuel Resche

(b Aurillac, June 18, 1784; d Tours, February 3, 1846). French conductor, composer, and violinist. He studied the violin with his uncle Jean Crémont in Limoges, and maybe with Baillot, Pierre. He left France around 1800 and was presumably a student of Beethoven, as he wrote himself later. At the age of 19, he became the director, concertmaster, and conductor of the Imperial Theatre in Moscow. He left Russia in ...

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José Antonio González

(b Bologna, c1770; d ?Mexico, after 1825). Italian composer and conductor. He was probably a pupil at the Bologna Conservatory and later studied with Paisiello and Cimarosa. In 1798 he was musical director at La Scala and his first opera, La citta nuova...

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Suzanne Clercx-Lejeune

(b Antwerp, bap. Sept 19, 1705; d Brussels, Aug 16, 1786). Flemish composer, conductor and violinist. At the age of 18 (7 November 1723) he was named first violin at the St Jacobskerk, Antwerp. In September 1729 he went to Brussels, where he entered the service of Prince Anselme-François of Thurn and Taxis. The prince held the monopoly of postal services in the Empire and had several residences, the most important being at Brussels and Frankfurt and later at Regensburg; de Croes is mentioned in the prince’s archives in Germany (in ...

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J. Bradford Robinson

(b Steinbach, Thuringia, April 23, 1715; d Leipzig, Feb 8, 1797). German composer, organist and conductor.

His father Johann Andreas Doles, the Kantor of Steinbach, died in 1720, leaving the family in great poverty, and the boy’s musical education was entrusted to his elder brother Johann Heinrich, who succeeded to his father’s position. At the age of 12 Johann Friedrich was sent to school in Schmalkalden. There at 15 he was offered the vacant organist’s post, in which he deputized for a year. At 19 he enrolled in the Schleusingen Gymnasium. After one and a half years he was made prefect of the school’s choir; he also organized a weekly concert series, together with a number of fellow students, and composed some motets, arias, an ...

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(b Dolní Dobrouč, Sept 1, 1780; d Dolní Dobrouč, May 18, 1844). Czech choirmaster, sometimes confused with František Xaver Dušek.

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W.H. Husk, Brian Crosby and Simon D.I. Fleming

(bap. Durham, July 30, 1738; d Durham, Sept 23, 1811). English organist, conductor, and composer. He was the third of seven children born to Thomas, a cordwainer. On 9 April 1748 he was admitted as a chorister at Durham Cathedral under James Hesletine and in ...

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Richard Jackson

(b Paris, France, 1781; d New York, NY, Jan 17, 1859). American pianist, teacher, and conductor. He was a student of François-Adrien Boieldieu and Charles-Simon Catel and recipient of the first prize in both piano and accompaniment at the Paris Conservatoire in 1800...

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(b Zerbst, Nov 18, 1736; d Berlin, Aug 3, 1800). German conductor and composer. He was baptized Christian Friedrich Carl; the above order of names is the one commonly preferred. He was the son of the Kapellmeister Johann Friedrich Fasch, from whom he had his first keyboard and theory instruction. Later he studied the violin with Carl Höckh, leader of the Zerbst court orchestra, and when he was 14 his father sent him to study for a year with Johann Wilhelm Hertel, leader of the orchestra at the Mecklenburg court in Strelitz. While in Strelitz, he had the opportunity to accompany the Berlin violinist Franz Benda, who was so impressed with the boy's playing that in ...

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Richard Crawford and David W. Music

(b Woburn, MA, May 28, 1737; d ?Boston, Dec 30, 1794). American conductor, bandmaster, engraver and tune-book compiler. He became an important figure in the musical life of Boston during the decade beginning in 1764, and was active in both sacred and secular music-making. He organized and performed in at least six concerts in Boston between ...

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Gian Paolo Minardi

(b Parma, Feb 27, 1746; d Parma, Dec 20, 1821). Italian composer and conductor. After moving with his father to Piacenza, he began his musical studies under Omobono Nicolini. With financial assistance from the ducal court he was able to travel to Bologna where from ...