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Article

Nicholas Temperley

(fl Castleton, Derbys., 1723–53). English psalmodist and ?composer. In 1723 he published the first edition of A Book of Psalmody in conjunction with John Barber. A second edition, by Robert Barber alone, followed in 1733, and a third, entitled David’s Harp Well Tuned...

Article

Sally Drage

(bap. Sunningwell, Oxon., June 23, 1700; d after 1758). English psalmodist and singing teacher . He was a farmer's son. One of the first itinerant singing teachers to engrave and print his own music, he was arguably the ‘father’ of the fuging-tune, which became popular in England and America during the late 18th century. A psalmody book, apparently produced in the mid-1720s, has not survived, but four later publications, all undated, make a substantial contribution to our knowledge of country psalmody. The different editions had identical titles, but the use of separate engraving plates meant that contents could vary according to the purchaser's requirements. The music, which Beesly collected but may not have composed, exemplifies the bare harmony and unresolved dissonance of much early Gallery music. Although a few previous examples exist, his claim that the 20 new psalm tunes were ‘Compos'd with veriety of Fuges after a different manner to any yet extant’ is fully justified; his tune to Psalm viii was widely reprinted....

Article

Frank Kidson, H.G. Farmer, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b ?London, ?1706; d London, bur. June 23, 1771). English engraver, publisher and bookseller. He worked in Covent Garden, London, having learnt the trade from his father George Bickham (b ?1684; d London, 4 May 1758), an engraver best known for ...

Article

Sylvette Milliot

(b c1693; d Paris, Nov 25, 1733). French music seller and music publisher. He was the nephew of the double bass player and composer Montéclair, and brother of the string instrument maker Claude Boivin. On 15 July 1721 Boivin bought the music shop ‘A la règle d’or’ on the rue St Honoré, Paris, after the death of Henry Foucault who had owned it; he and his uncle went into partnership to trade there. In addition to selling scores he soon published music and bought two licences in ...

Article

Robert J. Bruce and Ian Bartlett

(b London, bap. Sept 11, 1711; d London, Feb 7, 1779 ). English composer, organist and editor. Though formerly best known for some of his anthems and his editing of Cathedral Music (1760–73), the significant contribution he made to instrumental music, song, secular choral and theatre music in England is now widely recognized....

Article

Nicholas Temperley

(bap. Almondbury, Yorks. June 8, 1688; bur. Skipton, June 26, 1746). English psalmodist. Almondbury parish records show two baptisms of John Chetham, son of James Chetham: one on 26 December 1687, the other on 8 June 1688; presumably the first infant died soon after he was baptized. Axon printed a letter of ...

Article

Frank Kidson, William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b ?London, late 17th century; d London, Oct 1728). English music printer and publisher. As early as 1715 he was active in London as a general printer whose production included ballads, chapbooks, labels and shopkeepers’ signs. He soon turned to music printing and issued some of the best engraved music of his period. A considerable innovator, he experimented with new methods of printing both from engraved plates and from music types. Beginning with the printing of the ...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(fl London, 1740–60). English engraver. Several engravers of this name flourished in England during the 18th century, though probably only one worked at music. His first work appears in Walsh's publication of J.F. Lampe's Songs and Duetto's in … The Dragon of Wantley...

Article

William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

(b ?London, 1695–1705; d ?London, after1742). English music seller and publisher, father of organist and composer Benjamin Cooke. He was active in London from 1726 to 1743, and published a considerable number of vocal and instrumental works, some of them obviously pirated from other publishers, others under licence as authoritative first editions. His publications were mostly in a heavy bold style, but some were engraved in a lighter style by ...

Article

Lowell Lindgren

(b Rome; d ?London, after 1741). Italian teacher of languages and editor of librettos . He was in London by 1723, when he published A New Method for the Italian Tongue: or, a Short Way to Learn It. Its title-page identifies him as ‘a Roman, Master of the Latin, Spanish and Italian Languages; living at Mr. Wallis’s in Lisle-Street, near Leicester-Fields’, and its list of subscribers includes Ariosti, Bononcini, Geminiani, J. J. Heidegger and John Rich, the poet Paolo Antonio Rolli and many diplomats (including Riva of Modena). Rolli refers to Cori as Padre or Fra ‘Ciro’ in five extant epigrams and declares that he was defrocked and became a freemason. Rolli also describes him and the aged ‘Roscio’ (Giacomo Rossi) as teachers of Mongolese Italian who exercised their poetic ability where the ‘cembalo alemanno’ (‘German harpsichord’) had banished good sense. Cori as well as Rossi may thus have adapted texts for Handel in the 1730s....

Article

Frank Kidson, William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b ?London, ?1660–65; d ?London, ?1732–5). English music engraver, printer, publisher and music seller. He was probably the son of the 17th-century engraver Thomas Cross, who engraved some frontispieces and portraits for John Playford’s publications, including the portrait of the composer John Gamble (...

Article

Anne Schnoebelen

(d Oct 6, 1749). Italian music publisher and bookseller. His firm was active in Bologna for most of the 18th century and was famous in the art of typography and for the accuracy and elegance of its editions. In 1720, as head of a society of Bolognese printers, Della Volpe acquired the printing establishment of the widow of Giulio Borsaghi. His first musical publication was an enlarged edition (...

Article

Frank Dobbins

(fl Paris, 1690–1719/20). French music dealer and publisher. It is not known whether he was related to earlier publishers with the same family name, none of whom was apparently involved in music printing. Like other 18th-century music dealers, Henri Foucault was associated with the corporation of haberdashers and jewellers rather than that of the booksellers. He was originally a paper seller, with a shop ‘A la règle d’or’, rue St Honoré, but seems to have branched out from this trade by ...

Article

Jamie C. Kassler

(b ?London, ?1715; d Bedford, April 5, 1767). English lexicographer of French parentage. He served an apprenticeship to a Mr Godfrey, chemist in Southampton Street, Covent Garden. Since he was fluent in French, understood Latin and knew ‘a little’ about music, he became amanuensis to J.C. Pepusch, for whom he extracted passages from music-theoretical writings and translated into English some of the Greek music theorists from the Latin of Meibomius. With the recommendation of Pepusch, Maurice Greene and J.E. Galliard, Grassineau compiled ...

Article

Nicholas Temperley

(bap. Darfield, Yorks., May 5, 1692). English psalmodist. In his earlier years he worked with his elder brother, John Green (bap. Darfield, Yorks., 20 Sept 1677). According to Cummings (Grove3) he moved to London in later life and was a great bellringer....

Article

Theodor Wohnhaas

(b 1711; d Nuremberg, Oct 22, 1767). German music publisher. He founded a music publishing house in Nuremberg about 1742 with the copper-engraver Johann Wilhelm Winter (1717–60), and managed the business on his own from 1745; he was the leading Nuremberg music publisher of the mid-18th century. The firm specialized in the piano and chamber music of German (central and southern) and Italian composers, including C.P.E. Bach and Domenico Scarlatti. During his 25 years as a publisher Haffner issued about 150 works, all first editions; almost all were engraved by the outstanding Nuremberg engraver Johann Wilhelm Stör (...

Article

Alfred E. Lemmon

(b Cologne, Feb 27, 1714; d Münster, ?Jan 28, 1781). German philologist and compiler of music. He became a Jesuit missionary in 1732 and in 1746 left for Chile, where he arrived in 1748. After the Jesuits were expelled from the Spanish Americas in ...

Article

Frank Kidson, William C. Smith and D. Ross Harvey

(b ?London, c1657; d London, bur. Nov 18, 1732). English printer and manufacturer of printing ink. He set up as a Master about 1683, and was active until about 1715. With Thomas Moore and Francis Clark he printed Vinculum societatis (1687...

Article

Barbara Owen

(b Boston, 1708; d Boston, May 8, 1767). American organ builder, music engraver, craftsman and musician. In 1739 he led the singing in the Brattle Street Church, Boston, and was paid for singing in King's Chapel in 1754–6. He was active as an ornamental painter and japanner, and as an engraver of maps, certificates, trade cards, music etc.; he is also regarded as Boston's first professional organ builder. He is recorded as having tuned and repaired some of the imported English organs in Boston, which presumably served as his only textbook in the craft of organ building. In ...

Article

Sally Drage

(bur. Nuneaton, Sept 20, 1784). English psalmodist. He was an excise officer by profession and one of the leading composers of Gallery music. His four volumes of psalmody, the last two published posthumously, are among the best examples of the provincial Anglican repertory; the pieces range from simple tuneful carols to elaborate fuging-tunes and anthems. They were composed specifically for the growing number of ambitious parochial choirs and often include short instrumental symphonies and vocal solos, requiring experienced performers. His writing shows considerable technical skill, with a few Handelian echoes; despite occasional unconventional harmonies, it has an assured rhythmic vitality and melodic line. Some of his anthems remained popular and were republished, in refined versions, in England, Ireland and America well into the 19th century. The carol ...