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Article

Guy Bourligueux

(b Salon-de-Provence, bap. Feb 24, 1674; d after 1733). French composer. He was the son of Jean Abeille, a royal notary, and may have been a choirboy at the collegiate church of St Laurent in Salon-de-Provence. From 1699 to 1700 he was maître de chapelle...

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Robin Bowman

(fl 1697–1706). Italian composer, violinist and organist, active in northern Europe. At one time he was in the service of the Prince of Carignan (a small town in the French Ardennes) and in this capacity appeared as a violinist before Louis XIV in ...

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Manuel Carlos De Brito

(fl 1722–52). Portuguese composer and organist. Between 1722 (or earlier) and 1726 he was a royal scholar in Rome. On the second Sunday in Lent 1722 his oratorio ll pentimento di Davidde was performed in S Girolamo della Carità and on 9 July 1724...

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Robert Stevenson

(b La Puebla de Albortón, Zaragoza, bap. Sept 29, 1666; d Toledo, March 29, 1733). Spanish composer. He began music studies at Daruca at the age of 15, where he was maestro de capilla of the collegiate church, 1685–6. He held the same post at Lérida (...

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Guy Bourligueux

(b Barjols, Provence, bap. Sept 24, 1680; d Marseilles, Aug 8, 1762). French composer and priest. The son of Jean-Baptiste Audiffren and Marguerite Fabre, he presumably received his initial musical training as a choirboy at Barjols church; in 1694 he entered the service of the chapter of the Old Cathedral in Marseilles, where he was taught by the precentor, Melchior Barrachin. In ...

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Nicholas Temperley

(fl Castleton, Derbys., 1723–53). English psalmodist and ?composer. In 1723 he published the first edition of A Book of Psalmody in conjunction with John Barber. A second edition, by Robert Barber alone, followed in 1733, and a third, entitled David’s Harp Well Tuned...

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Sally Drage

(bap. Sunningwell, Oxon., June 23, 1700; d after 1758). English psalmodist and singing teacher . He was a farmer's son. One of the first itinerant singing teachers to engrave and print his own music, he was arguably the ‘father’ of the fuging-tune, which became popular in England and America during the late 18th century. A psalmody book, apparently produced in the mid-1720s, has not survived, but four later publications, all undated, make a substantial contribution to our knowledge of country psalmody. The different editions had identical titles, but the use of separate engraving plates meant that contents could vary according to the purchaser's requirements. The music, which Beesly collected but may not have composed, exemplifies the bare harmony and unresolved dissonance of much early Gallery music. Although a few previous examples exist, his claim that the 20 new psalm tunes were ‘Compos'd with veriety of Fuges after a different manner to any yet extant’ is fully justified; his tune to Psalm viii was widely reprinted....

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Caterina Pampaloni

(b Assisi, bap. Dec 12, 1683; d Assisi, bur. July 2, 1749). Italian composer and priest. Baptized Giovanni Domenico Antonio, he took the name Francesco Maria when he entered the Franciscan order as a novice on 25 November 1699. He served for two and a half months in the chapel of the basilica of S Francesco, Assisi, before moving to Città di Castello on ...

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Alexander Lingas

(b Constantinople, ?1665; d ?1725). Romaic (Greek) composer and cantor. Though undoubtedly influenced by the works of Panagiotes, Germanos and Balasios, he appears never to have been directly associated with the patriarchal court that nurtured his older colleagues. His own substantial contributions to their continuing renewal of Byzantine chanting were made instead from the Constantinopolitan parish church of St Constantine (in the district of Hypsomatheia), where Bereketes held successively the offices of reader, ...

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Watkins Shaw

(b c1665; d Winchester, Dec 19, 1737). English cathedral musician. According to Hawkins (History), he was a pupil of Daniel Roseingrave. Hawkins’s further statement that he was a lay singer of King’s College, Cambridge, is supported by the name of one ‘Bishop’ in the college books as lay clerk from ...

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Ruth Smith

(b London, July 5, 1704; d Bristol, Dec 21, 1774). English priest, religious and historical writer and librettist. He graduated BA (1727) and MA from Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, and had a successful church career, including posts as reader of the Temple Church, prebendary of Salisbury Cathedral and vicar of Bedminster, near Bristol, which he merited with several vindications of orthodox Christianity against contemporary free-thinking and a massive two-volume encyclopedia of comparative religion, ...

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Nicholas Temperley

(bap. Almondbury, Yorks. June 8, 1688; bur. Skipton, June 26, 1746). English psalmodist. Almondbury parish records show two baptisms of John Chetham, son of James Chetham: one on 26 December 1687, the other on 8 June 1688; presumably the first infant died soon after he was baptized. Axon printed a letter of ...

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John Walter Hill

(b ?Florence, c1680; ?d Florence, c1740). Italian priest and church musician. He is not related to other musicians of the same name. He was cappellano di onore to Cardinal Francesco Maria de' Medici from at least 1708 and a chaplain at the church of S Lorenzo in Florence. From ...

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(b Schaffhausen, Feb 7, 1695; d Schaffhausen, Jan 19, 1776). Swiss church musician. He came from a family from Rottweil am Neckar which had moved to Schaffhausen because of the Reformation. For 55 years (1718–73) Deggeller was Präzeptor of the senior class at the Gymnasium in Schaffhausen and Kantor at St Johann. It speaks for the esteem he enjoyed that the city authorities summoned everyone to pray for him when he underwent an operation for the removal of two gallstones in ...

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George J. Buelow

(b Lübeck, March 12, 1663; d Halle, June 8, 1727). German theologian and educator. A major figure in the development of Pietism, he was a leader in the reform of education in German Protestant schools, and founded the celebrated Orphans' School and so-called Franckeschen Foundation in Glaucha, outside Halle. Francke attended the gymnasium in Gotha, ...

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George J. Buelow

(b Templin, Uckermark, bap. Dec 29, 1669; d Berlin, bur. June 25, 1745). German organist, Kantor and writer. References in his own writings to hearing church music performed in Kyritz (in the Prignitz) and Penzlau suggest that he may have been a student in those towns. Later he studied with Buxtehude’s pupil F.G. Klingenberg (from Stettin), organist at the Nikolaikirche in Berlin. Fuhrmann said that in ...

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Siegfried Gmeinwieser

(b 1st half of 18th century; d June 1762). Italian composer and priest. He is said to have come from Venice. In September 1719 he succeeded G.O. Pitoni as maestro di cappella of S Giovanni Laterano, Rome. He had a high reputation for his superior musical abilities. In ...

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Robert Thompson

(bap. Oxford, May 24, 1688; bur. Oxford, Jan 7, 1741). English organist and music copyist, son of Richard Goodson. He was baptized at the church of St Cross. He succeeded his father as professor of music at Oxford and as organist of Christ Church. Goodson was listed as choirboy at Christ Church from ...

Article

Watkins Shaw and Robert Ford

(b Canterbury, bap. Jan 30, 1696; d Canterbury, March 9, 1777). English cathedral singer and antiquarian, son of John Gostling. He was educated at King’s School, Canterbury, and St John’s College, Cambridge (MA, 1719). He was a minor canon of Canterbury, 1727–77...

Article

Nicholas Temperley

(bap. Darfield, Yorks., May 5, 1692). English psalmodist. In his earlier years he worked with his elder brother, John Green (bap. Darfield, Yorks., 20 Sept 1677). According to Cummings (Grove3) he moved to London in later life and was a great bellringer....