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Hanns-Bertold Dietz and Joseph Vella Bondin

(b Valetta, Nov 16, 1715; d Naples, Oct 1760). Maltese composer and teacher. His grandfather, who was French, settled in Malta in 1661. Abos's cousin Carol Farrugia paid for him to go to Naples as a child and receive his musical training at the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù. An entry in the ...

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Gloria Eive

(b Faenza, bap. Dec 31, 1716; d Faenza, Oct 12, 1785). Italian violinist, composer and teacher. He studied with Tartini, probably between 1730 or 1731 and 1733, by which date his name appears in the list of musicians at Faenza Cathedral, as third (and last) violinist under the direction of his brother, Don Francesco Alberghi, ...

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Peter Ross

(b Zürich, Dec 26, 1695; d Zürich, June 23, 1755). Swiss composer and music pedagogue. The year of his birth has been given incorrectly in some sources as 1697. His father Joseph, originally a tailor and from 1692 a schoolteacher, planned a theological training for Johann Caspar, who was his second son. After study at the cathedral school, the Collegium Humanitatis, and (from ...

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Sally Drage

(bap. Sunningwell, Oxon., June 23, 1700; d after 1758). English psalmodist and singing teacher . He was a farmer's son. One of the first itinerant singing teachers to engrave and print his own music, he was arguably the ‘father’ of the fuging-tune, which became popular in England and America during the late 18th century. A psalmody book, apparently produced in the mid-1720s, has not survived, but four later publications, all undated, make a substantial contribution to our knowledge of country psalmody. The different editions had identical titles, but the use of separate engraving plates meant that contents could vary according to the purchaser's requirements. The music, which Beesly collected but may not have composed, exemplifies the bare harmony and unresolved dissonance of much early Gallery music. Although a few previous examples exist, his claim that the 20 new psalm tunes were ‘Compos'd with veriety of Fuges after a different manner to any yet extant’ is fully justified; his tune to Psalm viii was widely reprinted....

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Mary Cyr

(b Lunel, 1710; d Paris, Dec 1, 1772). French haute-contre singer, music teacher, cellist and composer. His début in 1733 at the Paris Opéra, according to La Borde, was in the monologue of Pélée, ‘Ciel! en voyant ce temple redoutable’ from Act 3 of Collasse's ...

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Jean-Paul Montagnier

(b Mantes-la-Jolie, 5/June 6, 1665; d Paris, July 6, 1734). French composer, harpsichordist, theorist and teacher. He probably learnt music in the maîtrise of the collegiate church of Notre Dame, Mantes, and in that of Evreux Cathedral. According to the Etat actuel de la Musique du Roi...

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Michael Talbot

(b Bologna, April 8, 1666; d Bologna, March 30, 1747). Italian composer and pedagogue. Having received his initial musical training in Bologna, he was employed as a singer in Rome between 1687 and 1690, attached to the choirs of S Luigi dei Francesi and S Agostino. Returning to Bologna, he was appointed singing master at the Scuole Pie in ...

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Robert Fajon

(b Lyons, c1683; d Paris, March 2, 1760). French composer, teacher and opera singer. The main source of information about him is the Parfaict brothers’ Dictionnaire des théâtres, which states that Bouvard entered the Opéra at a very young age to sing soprano parts, with a ‘voice of such a range that its like had never been heard’. After his voice broke, when he was about 16, he spent a couple of years in Rome. He was back in Paris by ...

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Edward R. Reilly

(b Provence, c1690; d Paris, Jan 13, 1768). French flautist and teacher, active in Germany. Marseilles is sometimes cited as his native city, but 18th-century sources indicate only that he came from Provence. As a young man he was taken to Constantinople by the French ambassador, and there, sometime before ...

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James L. Jackman and Paologiovanni Maione

(b Naples, 1692; d Naples, Jan 19, 1740). Italian composer and teacher. He was the son of Vito Cesare and Antonia Ricca Caballone. He studied with Veneziano and Perugino at the Neapolitan Conservatorio di S Maria di Loreto. In 1716 he married Teresa Muscettola whose sister Antonia was married to the violinist Francesco Barbella and was the mother of the violin virtuoso Emanuele Barbella; according to Burney, the famous violinist first learnt counterpoint from Caballone. The only one of Caballone's sons to follow him as a musician was Gaspare, who later spelt his name ‘Gabellone’. Michele's life and works are sometimes confused with those of his son; in addition some sources mistakenly claim that he was the teacher of Faustina Bordoni Hasse, who in fact studied with Michelangelo Gasparini....

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Giuseppe Vecchi

(b Bologna, Oct 19, 1690; d Bologna, July 7, 1774). Italian composer and teacher. A priest at S Petronio, he studied first plainsong and cantus figuralis and then, under Floriano Arresti, counterpoint. In 1717 he was received into the Accademia Filarmonica as a singer and in ...

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Lowell Lindgren

(b Rome; d ?London, after 1741). Italian teacher of languages and editor of librettos . He was in London by 1723, when he published A New Method for the Italian Tongue: or, a Short Way to Learn It. Its title-page identifies him as ‘a Roman, Master of the Latin, Spanish and Italian Languages; living at Mr. Wallis’s in Lisle-Street, near Leicester-Fields’, and its list of subscribers includes Ariosti, Bononcini, Geminiani, J. J. Heidegger and John Rich, the poet Paolo Antonio Rolli and many diplomats (including Riva of Modena). Rolli refers to Cori as Padre or Fra ‘Ciro’ in five extant epigrams and declares that he was defrocked and became a freemason. Rolli also describes him and the aged ‘Roscio’ (Giacomo Rossi) as teachers of Mongolese Italian who exercised their poetic ability where the ‘cembalo alemanno’ (‘German harpsichord’) had banished good sense. Cori as well as Rossi may thus have adapted texts for Handel in the 1730s....

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David Fuller and Bruce Gustafson

(b Rouen, April 10, 1707; d Paris, Jan 21, 1795). French organist, teacher, composer-arranger and author of methods on performing practice; son of Gaspard Corrette. Though little is known of his life, his works, which span nearly 75 years, provide an extraordinarily broad view of ordinary light music in France during the 18th century, and his methods are a rich source of information about performing practice and music of the period. He was married on ...

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Hanns-Bertold Dietz

(b Villa Santa Maria, Chieti, ?1709; d Naples, July 29, 1785). Italian composer and teacher. He was the brother of Michaele Cotumacci (b c1682), composer of a cantata for four voices and violins, Progressi vittoriosi della Fede Cattolica ottenuti della predicazione di S Francesco di Sales...

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Catherine Gas-Ghidina

(b Beauce, c1680; d c1760). French composer and music teacher. David studied music and composition with Nicolas Bernier between 1694 and 1698. From 1701 to 1706, he was chief of music for Philip V of Spain, and moved to Lyon in ...

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Hanns-Bertold Dietz

(d Naples, Aug 1774). German musician and teacher, active in Italy. Sponsored by the archbishop, Cardinal Spinelli, he entered the Neapolitan Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù on 15 December 1736, where he was registered as ‘Giuseppe Doll di Baviera, todesco’. His teachers were Francesco Durante and, after ...

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Mary Cyr

(fl 1735–55). French composer, viol player and teacher (‘maître de viole’). He worked in Paris. Throughout his Pièces de viole op.2, dedicated to the Prince of Carignan, Dollé used the signs for vibrato and ornaments adopted by Marin Marais, and the second of his three suites includes a tombeau for Marais ...

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Neal Zaslaw

(d Paris, 1740). French violin teacher and dancing-master. He published Principes de musique par demandes et réponce (Paris, 1713, 3/1719/R, 4/1740), which is valuable for its systematic exposition of the French performing practice called notes inégales (unequal notes). He also published ...

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David Fuller and Bruce Gustafson

(fl 1741–57). French composer and teacher of the harpsichord and hurdy-gurdy. He advertised himself as a student of (André) Campra and ‘other great masters’ in the Mercure (February 1753). His works are substantial in both quantity and quality, and merit something better than the total obscurity into which they have fallen, even though many are written for so unsatisfactory an instrument as the hurdy-gurdy....

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Walter Blankenburg and Dorothea Schröder

(b Schweinfurt, Nov 2, 1674; d Schweinfurt, Nov 22, 1751). German organist, composer and teacher. He was the son of a town musician and attended the Lateinschule and Gymnasium at Schweinfurt. In 1693 he went to Leipzig, where he studied theology and took part in musical performances directed by Kuhnau and N.A. Strungk. After taking the master’s degree, Englert was called back to his native town in ...