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Howard Serwer

(b Görmar, nr Mühlhausen, Jan 8, 1732; d Mühlhausen, 1773). German writer on music and composer. He was a magister of philosophy, an honorary member of the German Society of Altdorf University, and an imperial poet laureate. His writings include an original work on theory, contributions to the current discussions of Rameau's theories which he favoured, and translations and editions of works of others. In addition, he published an important article on the state of music in Mühlhausen, two in defence of music in the church, and one on the German language. His compositions, consisting largely of sacred vocal works to his own texts, were mostly written for the Marienkirche in Mühlhausen, where he was Kantor and music director. They include a setting of the Passion and a yearly cycle of cantatas (texts published in ...

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Title adopted by Edward Jones.

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Bathia Churgin

(b Turin, 1758; d Rome, Jan 1819). Italian theorist, violinist and composer. He was trained in Turin, a leading centre of violin playing in the 18th century; later he moved to Rome where (according to Fétis) he was active as a violin teacher, a composer of instrumental music, and musical director of the Teatro Valle for 15 years. Galeazzi published his six duets op.1 (...

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David Johnson and Suzanne Wijsman

(b Edinburgh, c1765; d Edinburgh, 1824). Scottish scholar, cellist and flautist. He studied the cello with Hugh Reinagle and was educated at Cambridge; in about 1790 he moved to London, where he worked as a cello and flute teacher. He returned to Edinburgh in ...

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T. Herman Keahey

(b Hanover, Nov 15, 1738; d Slough, Aug 25, 1822). English musician and astronomer of German birth. The son of the violinist and oboist Isaac Herschel (b 14 Jan 1707; d 22 March 1767), he was born Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel and became a naturalized English citizen on ...

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Nancy Kovaleff Baker

(b Rudolstadt, Oct 10, 1749; d Rudolstadt, March 19, 1816). German theorist and violinist. He served in his youth as a violinist in the Hofkapelle at Rudolstadt and in 1772 became a court musician. He studied the violin and composition with the Kapellmeister Christian Scheinpflug and briefly continued his studies in Weimar, Dresden, Berlin and Hamburg before returning to Rudolstadt, where he remained for the rest of his life. In ...

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Rudolph Angermüller

(b Salzburg, July 10, 1778; d Paris, April 3, 1858). Austrian composer, pianist and scholar. His chief importance is as a transitional figure between Classicism and Romanticism. His father, David Neukomm (1749–1805), was a schoolmaster and teacher in a teacher training college; his mother, Cordula (née Rieder, ...

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José López-Calo

(b Tarrasa, c1732; d El Escorial, Oct 19, 1781). Spanish theorist and instrumentalist. On 18 November 1756 he became a monk in the order of St Jerome at the monastery of El Escorial, where he taught plainsong and remained until his death. His brother Pablo Ramoneda, also a monk at El Escorial, was the ...

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Leonard G. Ratner and Thomas Emmerig

(b Deutsch-Hörschlag, Upper Austria, Jan 22, 1709; d Regensburg, Oct 23, 1782. Austrian theorist, composer and violinist. He attended the Jesuit Gymnasium, St Michael, in Steyr from 1727, and in 1733 he began studies in philosophy at the Jesuit college in Linz; at this time he started reading Fux’s ...

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Robert N. Freeman

(b Melk, Aug 4, 1748; d Vienna, Nov 8, 1833). Austrian composer, music historian and keyboard performer. He received his earliest musical training from Johann Leuthner, bass at the Benedictine abbey of Melk. In 1758 he went as a choirboy to Lilienfeld, where he learnt the violin, clavichord and organ and made his first attempts at composition. During vacations he revisited Melk to study the music of the new organist J.G. Albrechtsberger. Stadler continued his formal education after ...