1-10 of 46 results  for:

Clear all

Article

Anthony Seeger

This article examines the musical traditions of North and South America. The two continents, joined by a land bridge and embracing the Caribbean islands, present a multitude of genres and styles performed in a complex network of contexts by communities of diverse cultural and religious backgrounds. The regions, and often the countries, are often described separately (e.g. Chase, ...

Article

Ron Pen

Appalachia is the inextricable union of a place and a people bound in a vibrant but invisible web of culture specific to the Appalachian Mountains. While there is the physical reality of a mountain range, the concept of “Appalachia” as a region is a synthetic construct that developed towards the end of the 19th century. The borders of this region are fluid and subject to continuous interpretation and negotiation. Mountains are not constrained by political boundaries; identity is engendered by geography and culture. A highly inclusive definition based on economics formulated by the Appalachian Regional Commission in ...

Article

Region of south-west France with an important and distinctive repertory of both monophonic and polyphonic music in the Middle Ages. See Antiphoner, §3(iii) ; Gallican chant; Gradual, §4, (ii); Notation, §III, 1, (iv), (a); Organum, §7; Reproaches; St Martial; Sequence, §2; Tonary; Trope .

Article

An earth bow or Ground harp .

Article

Bactria  

Ancient civilization in Central Asia. It flourished in the last three centuries bce in the area now covered by northern Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and southern Turkmenistan. See Iran, §II.

Article

W.E. Yates

A term used of the culture of German-speaking Europe between the Treaty of Vienna (1815) and 1848, the year of revolutions. It is associated especially with southern Germany and with the Austria of Metternich, the architect of political stability in post-Napoleonic Europe. The term is borrowed from the name of a fictional schoolmaster created in the early 1850s by Ludwig Eichrodt (...

Article

Bohemia  

Region of central Europe, now part of the Czech Republic.

Article

Nancy R. Ping-Robbins, Marie Kroeger and John Brackett

A group of cities in North Carolina that includes Raleigh, the state capital (pop. 403,892; 2010 US Census), Durham (pop. 228,330; 2010 US Census), and Chapel Hill (pop. 49,919; 2010 US Census). The metropolitan area (pop. 1,742,816; 2010 US Census) is often referred to as the “Research Triangle” or “The Triangle,” owing to the presence of numerous businesses and industries in the area as well as many colleges and universities, notably the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Duke University in Durham, and North Carolina State University in Raleigh. Throughout its history, the Triangle region has fostered and supported a diverse array of vibrant musical communities performing in a variety of musical styles, including chamber and orchestral music, opera and choral groups and societies, gospel, jazz, folk, blues, rock, hip hop, bluegrass, and country. Touring regional and international performers attract large audiences at the RBC Center and the Time Warner Cable Music Pavilion at Walnut Creek in Raleigh, the Durham Performing Arts Center (DPAC), Memorial Hall in Chapel Hill, as well as numerous smaller halls, clubs, and bars throughout the area....

Article

Crete  

Ioannis Papadatos

The largest and most populous of the Greek islands. Its traditional music (kritiki paradosiaki mousiki) constitutes one of the richest and most distinctive oral repertories in Greece, well differentiated from mainland and other island idioms, and well supported by a long-established music industry....

Article

Caroline Polk O’meara

A collection of Manhattan neighborhoods south of 14th Street, several of which—including Greenwich Village, SoHo, and the Lower East Side—have fostered musical movements in the post-war era. The terms “downtown music” and “music downtown” have been used to refer to different genres—including popular, jazz, avant-garde, and concert music, among others—but they also often indicate the ways such categories have become increasingly blurred since the 1970s....