1-20 of 216 results  for:

  • Musicology and Music History x
Clear all

Article

London society, founded in 1726 as the Academy of Vocal Music. See London, §V, 2.

Article

Michelle Fillion

A term used to describe 18th-century chamber music with a substantially or fully written-out keyboard part and one or more accompanying instrumental parts. 18th-century sources most often designated these works by such terms as sonata, trio, terzetto, or divertimento for harpsichord or, simply, keyboard (later with the option of fortepiano), ‘with the accompaniment of’ or ‘that can be played with’ a violin (or flute), with or without cello. The accompanying parts could also be optional (...

Article

Guitar notation in which chords are symbolized by letters of the alphabet. See Guitar, §4 and Tablature, §4.

Colonna, Giovanni Ambrosio

Guitar, §4: The five-course guitar

Article

C. Matthew Balensuela

This article focusses on anonymous music theory texts within the following categories: works written during the Western Middle Ages and early Renaissance (to about 1600), currently assumed to be anonymous and not closely associated with a known person, which have been edited and published in modern times....

Article

Sydney Robinson Charles

A printed or manuscript collection of musical works selected from a particular repertory. Most anthologies contain works by more than one composer. Certain types of collection, which may be anthologies in the broadest sense – folksong collections, tune books, songsters, hymnals, psalters, pasticcios, ballad operas, organ and lute intabulations, and theory or performance manuals with music examples – are not considered in this article, which is confined to printed anthologies of music roughly contemporary with date of publication and containing works by different composers. For manuscript anthologies, ...

Article

[ I-AO 15]. See Sources, MS, §IX, 2.

Article

( D-LEu 1494). See Sources, MS, §IX, 6 and Sources of instrumental ensemble music to 1630, §4 .

Article

(F–APT 16bis). See Sources, MS, §VII, 3 .

Article

François Lesure, Roger Bowers, Barbara H. Haggh and André Vanrie

Archival documents contain accurate and detailed information relevant to many aspects of musical scholarship: to biography, chronology, history of institutions and societies, the place and function of musicians in society, performing practice (in the fullest sense of that phrase) and many others. They yield the kind of information that primarily musical manuscripts and printed sources cannot provide....

Article

( F-Pa 5198). See Sources, MS, §III, 4 .

Article

John Stevens

A French 13th-century chante-fable. The only surviving example of the genre, its sole source is F-Pn fr.2168. It tells, in prose, the romantic story of the love of a count’s son for a foreign girl-captive. Interspersed in the narrative are verse sections (laisses) written in lines with equal numbers of syllables, all sung to the same double phrase of melody (a relic of narrative singing; ...

Article

( IRL-Dtc D.1.21/ii). See Sources of lute music, §7.

Article

Gianluca D’Agostino

Designation attached to a three-voice Gloria in manuscript F-APT 16bis; the piece is also transmitted in I-IV 115. The Apt manuscript is now thought to contain music from the court of the antipopes at Avignon in the late 14th century. It is not clear whether the word refers to the name of a composer or to something else; it is now known that ‘Bararipton’ was a mnemonic used in medieval logic for one of the categories of syllogisms. However, any possible musical meaning of the word remains a mystery....

Article

Maricarmen Gómez

A cycle of the ordinary of the Mass belonging to the Avignon school found in the manuscript E-Bc M971 (ff.1r–8r) that almost certainly belonged to the chapel of King Martin I of Aragon (1396–1410). It is made up of five fragments, written, with the exception of the four-part Agnus Dei, for three parts....

Article

( F-Pn Vm7 674–5).See Sources of keyboard music to 1660, §2, (ii).

Article

( US-BEm 744). Late 14th-century French collection of five theoretical treatises. See Anonymous theoretical writings, Cat.no.46.

Article

Bhangra  

Peter Manuel

A music and dance genre of the Punjab. The term is also used for loosely related modern popular music styles based in South Asia and Great Britain. Traditional bhangra (bhāgṛā), associated in particular with the vernal Vaiśākhī festival, features vigorous male dancing accompanied by ḍhol...

Article

Stanley Boorman

The study and description of musical documents and of the literature about music, especially in published form. The most widespread use of the word ‘bibliography’, in music or in any scholarly endeavour, refers to lists, appended to publications, of other scholarly writings which the author used while writing, or which would be useful to an interested reader. This usage is represented at the end of nearly every article in the present dictionary, and might be called ‘citation bibliography’. It is a reflection of a selection process, drawing on and assessing a detailed listing of as much of this secondary literature as possible. The preparation of such full-scale listings is called ‘reference bibliography’. Yet the term has arrived at this usage from more detailed and scholarly practices. The etymology of the word implies the writing of books, but (in common with most other terms ending in ‘-graphy’), it has come also to mean their study, or at least their description, and usually refers to printed material. This leads to two other usages, specifically concerned with the character of books and editions, and only secondarily with their contents. Under the specifier ‘descriptive’, bibliography refers to a listing (with detailed descriptions) of the make-up of books. ‘Analytical’ bibliography goes further, involving the study of books as objects, the manner of their making, their history, and their place in the history of their contents....

Article

Lodewijk Muns

(b Nijmegen, Netherlands, Aug 4, 1812; d Delft, Netherlands, Nov 1, 1896). Dutch musician, music historian, and instrument collector. The son of a musician and instrument seller, he studied flute and violin at the conservatory of The Hague. After positions as an orchestra musician in the Court Chapel and the French Opera of The Hague, with the Casino Paganini in Paris, and as a conductor at the opera of Metz, he returned in ...

Article

[F-Pn Rés.Vma.851]. See Sources, MS, §IX, 9 and Sources of instrumental ensemble music to 1630, §2.