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Article

Herbert Heyde

By ‘makers’ marks’ is meant here the practice of identifying the makers of Western instruments by means of marks, labels, brands, inscriptions, and other legible indications on the instruments. Marks of ownership and technical markings (such as serial and batch numbers) are not considered here....

Article

Laurence Libin

Apart from the dangers (cuts, burns, eye and muscle injury, dust inhalation, chemical toxicity, etc.) inherent in making instruments, playing and maintaining them also pose risks that belie the benign associations of music-making. When these risks are ignored, users and instrument technicians can suffer serious consequences. Musicians’ unions have drawn attention to health problems arising from performance conditions, and some medical doctors specialize in issues of concern to musicians; the Performing Arts Medical Association represents their interests in the USA. Physical therapists employ Alexander and Feldenkrais techniques among other corrective exercises aimed at improving performance functions. This article cites some typical occupational hazards, which range in severity from minor muscle strain to tooth displacement to permanently disabling accidents. For example, crushing injuries can result from unsafe moving of pianos, and a piano technician can lose an eye if a string breaks during restringing or tuning. Pipe organ technicians often work high within an organ’s case where, in old organs particularly, ladders, access boards, and pipe racks can give way, causing falls....

Article

Edmond T. Johnson

(b Memphis, TN, 17 June 1957). American artist, composer, performer, and instrument inventor best known for inventing the Long String Instrument. Originally interested in visual and performance art, Fullman attended the Kansas City Art Institute where she began to incorporate sound into her works, at first through the manipulation of magnetic tape. Her first major work was the ...

Article

Laurence Libin

(b Cambridge, MA, 8 March 1945). American ceramist, musician, and instrument maker. She holds a BA in English from the University of California at Berkeley and New York University (1967) and an MA in psychology from Pepperdine University (1972), but is largely self-taught in ceramic art. Her publications on musical acoustics and prehispanic ceramic instruments are based primarily on original research on mesoamerican examples, including work in Mexico supported by the National Endowment for the Arts (...

Article

Allison A. Alcorn

(b Avington, PA, 14 May 1953). American maker of historical harps, lyres, and psalteries. Lewandowsi grew up surrounded by arts and crafts, and graduated from Sarah Lawrence College with a degree in philosophy and early music just as the early music movement in America was in full swing. While other historical instruments seemed in ready supply, early harps were not, and Lewandowski, largely self-taught, began making them herself in ...

Article

(fl Barcelona, Spain, c1790–1825). Catalonian guitar maker, considered one of the most important luthiers of his period in Spain. He was probably a son of the luthier Francisco Matabosch, active in Barcelona during the second half of the 18th century. Although highly regarded by such performers as Dionisio Aguado and Fernando Sor (whose first guitar was reportedly built by Matabosch), he is survived by only one instrument (...

Article

Christopher Brodersen

(b Montreal, Quebec, 9 Feb 1952). American oboist and maker of early oboes, based in Eugene, Oregon. She studied modern oboe with Alan Vogel at the California Institute of the Arts (1970–75) and privately with Marc Lifschey (1971–3). Her Baroque oboe teachers included Ku Ebbinge and Stephen Hammer. She served as an adjunct instructor of Baroque oboe at the University of Southern California School of Music. Taylor began making Baroque oboes in ...

Article

Herbert Heyde

This article discusses trends in organizing the production of European instruments from the 15th century to the mid-19th.

During the 15th century European instrument making entered a new phase with the rise of polyphonic instrumental music. Previously, folk and minstrel instruments had been made mostly by the players themselves. The intricacies of polyphonic music and the social context in which sophisticated instruments such as clavichords, trombones, lutes, and viols were played demanded craft refinement and specialization. The professional traditions of organ building and bell founding provided precedents upon which the new branches of trade could build. While the production of folk instruments continued as it had previously, the new, commercial approach to instrument making gradually evolved into two major forms, which were first observable in the processes of both bell founding and organ building. These forms were small craft-workshops and entrepreneurial businesses. These two forms sometimes intersected; small workshops would sometimes grow and develop into entrepreneurial businesses....

Article

Christopher Brodersen

(b Bethlehem, PA, 1947). American oboist and maker of early oboes and bassoons, based in Germany. After initial studies at the Oberlin Conservatory, he enrolled at the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis, studying Baroque oboe under Michel Piguet (1932–2004). Hailperin graduated from the Schola Cantorum in ...