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Jonas Westover

This entry addresses a selection of the various places and spaces for music performance in the United States. It is organized with an emphasis on function, considering types of performance venues alongside such issues as repertory, genre, style, and social impact. Virtually any location can host a musical performance; however, this entry will focus on venues that have become known for featuring musical events. Further consideration of venues can be found throughout the dictionary in dedicated entries, among them ...

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Private, coeducational, Jesuit university established in 1904 as Loyola College. See New orleans.

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A conservatory in New York founded as the David Mannes Music School by David and Clara Damrosch Mannes in 1916;

see New york.

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Institute of higher education founded in Minneapolis in 1851. Its school of music was founded in 1903.

See Minneapolis and st. paul; see also Libraries and collections.

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Institute of higher education established in Kansas City.

See Kansas city.

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Honorary music society founded in 1925;

see Fraternities and sororities.

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Honorary music society founded in 1903;

see Fraternities and sororities.

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Musicians’ union founded in 1886; see Unions, musicians’.

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School of music founded by eben Tourjée in 1867; see Boston (i), and Libraries and collections.

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Privately endowed university in Evanston, Illinois, whose school of music was established in 1895.

See Chicago (i); see also Evanston, Illinois, in Libraries and collections.

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Music conservatory, part of the Peabody Institute of the John Hopkins University, founded by George Peabody in Baltimore in 1857; see also Libraries and collections.

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Claude Conyers

National professional fine arts sorority.

See Fraternities and sororities.

Claude Conyers

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Name often used to refer to the cities Chapel Hill, Raleigh, and Durham in North Carolina;

see Chapel hill, Raleigh, Durham.

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Institution of higher education founded in Houston in 1912. Its Shepherd School of Music sponsors many musical activities in the city.

See Houston.

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Institution of higher education in New Jersey, founded as Queen's College in 1766 and renamed Rutgers College in 1825. It was established as a university in 1925. The Institute of jazz studies moved to the Newark campus in 1967.

See also Newark.

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A private university in Dallas whose music department was founded in 1917.

See Dallas–fort worth and Libraries and collections.

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University founded in 1834 as the Medical College of Louisiana. Its music department was founded in 1909.

See New orleans; see also Libraries and collections.

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State university located in Salt lake city.

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Laura Maes and Troy Rogers

Name of an ensemble of acoustic automatons invented and constructed since 1990 by Godfried-Willem Raes (b Ghent, 3 Jan 1952). The Logos Foundation, a contemporary music centre located in Ghent that was founded by Raes in 1968, is home to the more than 45 automatons that comprise the ensemble. It includes organ-like instruments, monophonic wind instruments, string instruments, percussion instruments, and noise generators. Most are automations of existing instruments, and many offer wider possibilities than their manual equivalents. Raes’s intention was not to replace performers, but to expand musical possibilities with machines that can outperform humans in speed, dynamic control, and a number of simultaneously sounding notes. Most of the instruments are tuned to 12-tone equal temperament, although some are tuned to equal tempered quartertones. The sirens robot and all the monophonic wind instruments can be tuned with 0.78125-cent precision and can thus be used with nearly any tuning system....

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