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Private, coeducational, Jesuit university established in 1904 as Loyola College. See New orleans.

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A federally funded music curriculum development project undertaken at various American sites from 1965 to 1972. Led by founding director Ronald B. Thomas, the project developed an innovative spiral music curriculum for kindergarten through grade 12, with emphasis on creativity and 20th-century art music.

K.S. Moon...

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A conservatory in New York founded as the David Mannes Music School by David and Clara Damrosch Mannes in 1916;

see New york.

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Institute of higher education founded in Minneapolis in 1851. Its school of music was founded in 1903.

See Minneapolis and st. paul; see also Libraries and collections.

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Institute of higher education established in Kansas City.

See Kansas city.

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School of music founded by eben Tourjée in 1867; see Boston (i), and Libraries and collections.

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Privately endowed university in Evanston, Illinois, whose school of music was established in 1895.

See Chicago (i); see also Evanston, Illinois, in Libraries and collections.

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Music conservatory, part of the Peabody Institute of the John Hopkins University, founded by George Peabody in Baltimore in 1857; see also Libraries and collections.

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Institution of higher education founded in Houston in 1912. Its Shepherd School of Music sponsors many musical activities in the city.

See Houston.

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Institution of higher education in New Jersey, founded as Queen's College in 1766 and renamed Rutgers College in 1825. It was established as a university in 1925. The Institute of jazz studies moved to the Newark campus in 1967.

See also Newark.

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A private university in Dallas whose music department was founded in 1917.

See Dallas–fort worth and Libraries and collections.

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University founded in 1834 as the Medical College of Louisiana. Its music department was founded in 1909.

See New orleans; see also Libraries and collections.

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State university located in Salt lake city.

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Music conservatory established with private donations in New York in 1885 by Jeannette Meyer Thurber. Although intended as a national institution, the only federal contribution was $200,000 in 1891. antonín Dvořák was director from 1891 to 1895. Influential in its prime, the conservatory quietly closed around ...

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An organization founded in 1926 to administer contests for school wind bands; see Band.

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Vivian Perlis and Christopher E. Mehrens

(b Brownsville, TX, 4 Aug 1888; d New York, NY, 11 April 1978). American administrator, pianist, and educator. She was educated in France, Germany, and New York, and in 1906 began piano studies with Bertha Fiering Tapper at the Institute of Musical Art (later the Juilliard School). From ...

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Mark Clague

(b Spring Gulch, CO, 12 Feb 1902; d Ann Arbor, MI, 16 July 1994). American band director and educator. A fierce taskmaster, he elevated standards and influenced generations of band directors and musicians. Revelli played violin as a child, training for a career in Chicago's theater orchestras at Chicago Musical College (BM ...

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Dena J. Epstein and Karen M. Bryan

(b Florida, NY, 25 Jan 1835; d East, Orange, NJ, 30 Aug 1902). American music educator and editor. Seward studied in Boston with Lowell Mason, george frederick Root, and thomas Hastings. After appointments as organist in New London, Connecticut (1857–9), Rochester, New York (...

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William Brooks and Christopher E. Mehrens

(b Buckland, MA, 14 March 1826; d Dorchester, MA, 14 April 1888). American composer and music educator. He learned music in singing-schools and assemblies conducted by Lowell Mason, george james Webb, and others. He taught briefly in Massachusetts before moving to Hudson, New York, to teach in public schools and at the Claverack Seminary. By ...