1-20 of 137 results  for:

  • All : Opera for all x
  • Music Manager or Administrator x
Clear all

Article

Isabelle Henrion-Dourcy

professional opera troupe of the country, transforming the life-style of actors from that of peasants to that of performer-beggars roaming all over Tibet. According to legend she is the only woman to have performed on the stage of Norbulingka for Zho-ston in front of the Dalai Lama. Images of her large size, unconventional demeanour and facial pilosity are evoked in folk tradition. Bibliography Bod-ljongs lha-mo tshogs-pa [Tibet opera troupe], Bod kyi lha-mo ’lugs-khag ngo-sprod byed-pa [Introducing the different schools of Tibetan opera] (MS, Lhasa

Article

Maureen Needham Costonis

19, 1929 ). Russian impresario . A perceptive amateur of the arts gifted with a flair for organization and publicity, he was intimately involved in all aspects of the production, and even creation, of operas and ballets by composers including Stravinsky, Ravel and Prokofiev. In 1908 , intent on introducing Russian opera to an enthusiastic crowd of Parisians, he imported Shalyapin, Natasha Yermolenko and an all-Russian cast for a production of Musorgsky’s Boris Godunov . In the following year he returned to Paris to launch his Ballets Russes company, meanwhile

Article

Peter G. Davis

Reviser Nicola Badolato

Houston), Turandot for the ENO, Faust for the WNO, and an acclaimed postmodern Fliegender Holländer for the Canadian Opera Company, Toronto (all 1996 ). As an opera director, Alden is known for his use of contemporary imagery and a minimalist visual style. For example, he has likened his own 1984 production of Monteverdi’s L’incoronazione di Poppea to a new wave rock video and has frequently expressed his desire to connect the inner world of opera theater to the modern sensibility of a younger audience. His use of explicit sexuality, brutal violence, and exaggerated

Article

Karen M. Bryan

Worsham, Estelle Clough, Desseria Plato, and Mary Terrell. The longevity of the company was due, in part, to Drury’s practical approach to the business of opera. While he relied on a core of soloists, he did not maintain a continuous roster, instead hiring singers “as needed” and eliminating the need for an expensive payroll. All of the chorus members and most soloists were African American but Drury would, at times, hire white soloists and he relied primarily on white orchestras. Bibliography E. Southern : The Music of Black Americans (New York

Article

Julian Budden

Iphigénie en Aulide ( 1812 ), so inaugurating the new tradition of Italian opera seria in which all recitative was orchestrally accompanied (early examples include Mayr’s Medea in Corinto in 1813 and the Rossinian canon beginning with Elisabetta, regina d’Inghilterra in 1815 ). He was among the first to recognize Rossini’s genius and in 1815 engaged him at Naples with a six-year contract with the obligation to compose two operas a year and to direct revivals of older works, all for the yearly sum of 12,000 francs and part of the proceeds of the gambling

Article

Manfred Boetzkes

(‘The Brigand’s Ballad’) he designed in 1948 for Prague, restaging it in 1986 . As well as collaborating with Kǎslík on numerous productions ( Die Frau ohne Schatten , 1967 ; Pelléas et Mélisande , 1969 ; and Nabucco , 1972 , all at Covent Garden; and Idomeneo , 1981 , Ottawa), he designed the first production of Kǎslík’s opera La strada ( 1982 , Prague). Svoboda was responsible for the opening production, Libuše , of the refurbished National Theatre in Prague in 1983 . Although his ‘trademark’ staircase began to seem a formula, few other stage designers

Article

Max Loppert

of Alexander Goehr’s Arden must Die ; this led to Glyndebourne ( The Cunning Little Vixen , 1975 ) and thence to close associations with Kent Opera and the ENO. For Kent, Miller produced operas by, among others, Mozart ( Così fan tutte ), Verdi ( Rigoletto , La traviata , Falstaff ), Monteverdi ( L’Orfeo ) and Tchaikovsky ( Yevgeny Onegin ), which had as their common factor an imaginative avoidance of all extraneous decorative effect and, often, a compelling economy of physical movement. For the ENO, Miller’s stagings, which have included Le nozze di Figaro ,

Article

early age, but he approached opera only after considerable successful experience as a director and designer in the spoken theatre and as a film director. This step was in part prompted by his admiration for Maria Callas, who sang in his first production, Spontini’s La vestale ( 1954 , La Scala). In successive years, also with Callas, he staged La sonnambula , La traviata , Anna Bolena and Iphigénie en Tauride , all at La Scala (he wrote on Callas in Opera , xxi, 1970 , pp. 806–19 and 911–21). In 1958 he directed his first opera outside Italy, the highly successful

Article

Thomas Walker, Beth L. Glixon and Jonathan E. Glixon

Faustini-Cavalli collaborations constituted the most constant presence during a highly unstable and formative decade in the history of Venetian opera. Faustini's dramas, the plots and characters of which are usually newly invented, rather than historical or mythological, often develop the entangled relations of two pairs of lovers, cleverly resolving all problems at the last moment to the satisfaction of all (or nearly all) concerned. Some of the later plots are highly intricate, notably L'Eritrea (performed in 1652 ), his last completed work, which may have profited

Article

Barry Millington

production of Martinů’s Julietta for Opera North ( 1997 ), an impressive début, with Rigoletto , for the the New Israeli Opera ( 1997 ) and librettos and stagings for Maxwell Davies’s Doctor of Myddfai ( 1997 , WNO) and Mr Emmet Takes a Walk ( 2000 , St Magnus Festival). He continues to work frequently for ENO, and directed a controversial Nabucco (in which the orchestra played on stage) in the 2000–01 season. Writings ‘Words, Music and Tradition’, Opera , 38 (1987), 1375–9 ‘The Joy of Rimsky’, Opera , 39 (1988), 1405–9

Article

John Rosselli

Lisbon and Oporto. He developed a theatrical agency on which he concentrated in later life, in addition to acting as Milan representative for leading impresarios. When he was praised as a singer it was for his comic verve and acting ability: in a one-act opera (to his own libretto), Frondoni’s Un terno al lotto , he sang all the parts. Bibliography DBI ( E. Venturini ) ES ( C. Sartori ) Correspondence: I-Fn , Carteggi Vari 351 [also comments on him in 364/153, 365/34–5]; Mt , Spettacoli Pubblici 109, 112/1; Ms

Article

Rodney Milnes

in 1955 . He was director of the Royal Shakespeare Company ( 1960–68 ), and of the National Theatre ( 1973–88 ). In 1969 he was made joint director (with Colin Davis) of the Royal Opera, but he resigned before officially taking up the post. He was artistic director of Glyndebourne Festival Opera from 1984 to 1990 . He was made a CBE in 1963 , and knighted in 1977 . His first opera production was the première of John Gardner’s The Moon and Sixpence ( 1957 , Sadler’s Wells), but the first to catch the public eye was the British stage première of Moses und Aron

Article

Patrick O’Connor

Who’s rock opera Tommy ( 1974 ). His first stage opera direction was of The Rake’s Progress in Florence ( 1982 ), followed by Zimmermann’s Die Soldaten in Lyons and Madama Butterfly in Spoleto (both 1983 ), La bohème in Macerata, Faust and L’italiana in Algeri in Geneva (all 1984 ) and Boito’s Mefistofele in Genoa ( 1987 ). Deliberately provocative and always controversial, Russell nevertheless had a wide knowledge of music and theatre which made him one of the most influential directors of recent times. He had claimed that for him opera is ‘the last

Article

Manfred Boetzkes

Venice Arsenal around 1640 , when he designed the Teatro Novissimo, Venice’s fourth public opera house, built in 1641 . He invented a new system of stage machinery which for the first time enabled the whole set to be changed in one operation: the wings were supported on undercarriages running on rails beneath the stage, and were moved by turning a central roller to which the undercarriages were attached by ropes. In the next few years Torelli designed the sets for all the operas staged in the Teatro Novissimo, and occasionally worked for the Teatro di SS Giovanni e Paolo

Article

Michael Barnard

are parodies of popular operas by F.-A. Philidor, Piccinni, Rameau, Boieldieu and others. Despréaux and the dancer Marie Madeleine La Guimard performed together in these pieces and were married in 1789 . He may have been the Despréaux who, on attending an opera at Versailles, asked for a seat where he could hear the music but not the words, because ‘I greatly esteem the music of Lully, but have contempt for the verses of Quinault’ ( Almanach des spectacles , 1772 ). Works all printed works published in Paris Parodies all librettos by Despréaux

Article

Ethyl L. Will and Elisabeth Cook

of the Comédie-Italienne in 1760 , of the Comédie-Française two years later, and organized, amid a web of intrigue, the amalgamation of the Comédie-Italienne with the Opéra-Comique in February 1762 ). At the king’s request La Ferté assisted in the reorganization of the Opéra in 1776 , and although this occupied him only until the following year, he later took over the administration of the Opéra for ten years, from 1780 to 1790 . A related responsibility, from 1784 , was the direction of the Ecole Royale de Chant (the forerunner of the Paris Conservatoire).

Article

Fredric Woodbridge Wilson

Robert Reece and Arthur Law. In 1867 Reed leased the new St George’s Hall, Langham Place, for the production of comic opera. Here he produced full-length musical pieces, with full cast and orchestra, including Sullivan’s The Contrabandista ( 18 December 1867 ), Auber’s L’ambassadrice , and The Beggar’s Opera . This endeavour, however, was not a commercial success. Reed also played an important role in the development of the ‘Savoy opera’. He produced six early pieces by W.S. Gilbert, whose Ages Ago ( 1869 , music by Frederic Clay) was one of Reed’s longe

Article

Lowell Lindgren

‘the most famous of all, … the Intermede of Hell' in Perti’s Nerone fatto Cesare ( 1695 ): ‘great Numbers of Foreigners came to Rome on purpose to behold it, and confess'd when they had seen it, that it far exceeded the Expectations Fame had given ’em of it’. Bibliography DBI ( C. Rotondi ) ES ( B. Brunelli ) GroveO ( L. Lindgren ) [with further bibliography] MGG1 ( F. Bisogni ) M.G. Morei : ‘Filippo Acciajuoli’, Notizie istoriche degli Arcadi morti , ed. G.M. Crescimbeni , 1 (1720), 357–61 F. Fuà : L'opera di Filippo Acciajuoli

Article

Winton Dean

married in 1688 and had four children, all of whom predeceased their parents (Heidegger's wife died in 1747 ). Leaving Switzerland as the result of a love affair, he travelled in Europe, reaching London by 1707 . He remained in England until his death, but was apparently not naturalized. According to the Scots Magazine he served for a time in Queen Anne's Life Guards. He soon acquired a reputation as a man of taste, critical judgment and business acumen, and played a considerable part in the establishment of Italian opera in London. He selected the arias for the

Article

Lowell Lindgren

Employment he distinguish'd himself by his indefatigable Industry and the general Satisfaction he gave to all the Directors’. His ‘uncommon Modesty, Candour, Affability and all the amiable Virtues of Life’ undoubtedly contributed much to his success in collaborative endeavours. From 1694 to 1700 he was occasionally employed as a cellist by Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni in Rome. He may also have played in the orchestra at the Teatro Capranica, which staged the first two operas he was to adapt for London: Alessandro Scarlatti's Pirro e Demetrio ( 1694 ) and Giovanni Bononcini's