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Article

Carole Rosen

Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, in partnership with Augustus Harris. In 1887 the Carl Rosa Opera was turned into a limited liability company, and so was able to survive the death of its founder in Paris in April 1889 at the age of 47. Indeed, such was the success of the company in the great industrial cities, presenting opera in the language of the audience, with subscription tickets at all prices, that three Carl Rosa touring troupes were set up. In October 1892 the Grand Opera Company received the royal accolade with a performance of La fille du régiment at Balmoral

Article

Administration and the Civil Works Administration. Under the able leadership of its first national director, Nikolai Sokoloff ( 1935–9 ), the project focussed on the employment of musicians as performers in orchestras, concert and dance bands, chamber music and choral ensembles, and opera companies. Statistics for the period January 1936 to April 1940 show 250,000 performances reaching an audience of 159 million. At its peak in 1936 , the project employed over 15,000 people in 42 states and the District of Columbia. Other activities sponsored by the project included

Article

Beseda  

John Tyrrell

Link , ed.: Beseda: český salonní tanec [The beseda : a Czech salon dance] (Prague, 1863, 6/1939; Fr. trans., 1863) F. Bonuš : Český salonní tanec beseda, jeho historie a tvůrci [The Czech salon dance beseda , its history and creators] (Prague, 1971) J. Tyrrell : Czech Opera (Cambridge, 1988), 226–8 J. Tyrrell , ed. and trans.: Zdenka Janáčková: My Life with Janáček (London, 1998), 67–8

Article

Anthony Hicks

published the Göttingen Händel-Beiträge . The Deal and Walmer Handelian Society was founded by the Handel scholar James S. Hall ( 1899–1975 ) in 1946 , principally to give performances of the choral works, and the Handel Opera Society (renamed Handel Opera in 1977 ) was founded in London in 1955 , primarily to give stage performances of dramatic works. In all, 28 works were staged; its last production was of Rodrigo in 1985 ( see London, §IV, 2 ; Handel [Händel, Hendel], George Frideric, §24 ; Editions, historical ). Bibliography MGG1 (‘Händelge

Article

Susan Badger Booth

operations as well as the strategic long-range planning necessary to fulfill the organization’s mission. Not-for-profit music organizations include but are not limited to: professional and community symphony orchestras and bands, choirs and chorales, chamber orchestras, music ensembles, opera companies, university music societies, presenters, music festivals and jazz bands and ensembles. General duties of an arts administrator can include human resource management, marketing, accounting and financial management, public relations, fundraising, program development and evaluation

Article

Decca  

Maureen Fortey

Arnold Östman in Mozart operas, all using period instruments and techniques. Other important issues include the recording of Haydn's complete symphonies by the Philharmonia Hungarica under Antal Dorati, in the early 1970s, and several operas with Joan Sutherland in leading roles, chiefly conducted by Richard Bonynge. In the 1990s Decca issued the ‘Entartete Musik’ series, of supposedly ‘decadent’ music banned under the Nazis. The company's roster of artists during the last decades of the 20th century included Vladimir Ashkenazy, Riccardo Chailly, Luciano Pavarotti,

Article

Reed, our Captain and Copland’s setting of Alfred Hayes’s Into the Streets May First , judged the best setting of the text assigned for May Day 1934. By the end of 1938 the Collective had disbanded, though it had set the stage for Blitzstein’s opera The Cradle will Rock , Robinson’s Ballad for Americans and all that followed from them. It also provided an example for Alan Lomax, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger and other pioneers of the activist folksong movement. Bibliography Foreword, Workers Song Book , no.1 (New York, 1934) Foreword

Article

Mark Clague and Michael Mauskapf

providing charitable services to the general public, a growing tension between orchestras, opera companies, and popular audiences would lead to ongoing disagreement regarding their nonprofit status. 2. The rise of singing schools. By the turn of the 20th century, the nonprofit sector had begun to distinguish itself more clearly from the public and for-profit sectors by addressing societal needs not met by government or big business. Nonprofit organizations of all types appeared in industries where the government failed to provide adequate services and

Article

EMI  

Peter Martland

first Society set was of Hugo Wolf songs, by Elena Gerhardt. It was in the Society series that Artur Schnabel recorded Beethoven's complete solo piano works. Legge's colleague David Bicknell broke new ground with a series of Mozart opera recordings from the new Glyndebourne opera house. Gaisberg remained active and made a series of complete opera recordings with Beniamino Gigli; he also made records of Elgar conducting his own works, among them the 1932 collaboration between Elgar and the 16-year-old violinist Yehudi Menuhin in his Violin Concerto, one of the 20th century's

Article

Academy  

Howard Mayer Brown and Iain Fenlon

the earliest court operas, Monteverdi's Orfeo ( 1607 ), was commissioned by Prince Francesco Gonzaga of Mantua to entertain members of the Accademia degli Invaghiti. By the 18th century the Accademia degl'Intronati had its own theatre, described on the title-page of various opera librettos as the ‘Teatro Grande della nobilissima Accademia degl'Intronati’, where opera was performed during Carnival season. Various other academies even served as financial guarantors of opera seasons. Thus the Accademia degli Immobili in Florence supported opera productions at the

Article

Percy M. Young, Edmund A. Bowles, Charles Edward McGuire and Jennifer Wilson

typically retained more modest forces. All festivals, however, copied the Westminster commemoration concerts’ programmes: for several decades, Handel’s Messiah was frequently the only oratorio performed whole at morning sacred concerts. Other sacred concerts featured selections from Handel’s oratorios, as well as his anthems and concertos, mixed with works by other composers, such as movements from a mass or an anthem. Evening secular concerts opened and closed with a symphony or an opera overture and featured arias and ensembles from operas that were in vogue and concertos

Article

Daniel Zager

librarians in three ways. Most common is the firm order, where a specific publication is ordered by the librarian. A second is standing (or continuation) orders, in which the dealer is instructed to send all new items within a specific set or series, such as a composer collected edition or a national historic series. Or, in the realm of recordings, parameters may include all new issues of a particular label. The third is the approval plan, conceptually similar to a standing order but on an expanded basis and with the privilege of returning unwanted items to the dealer. The

Article

Approximately 120 works for small orchestra were commissioned, in addition to several operas and 21 works by student composers. The following is a list of works commissioned by the Louisville Orchestra as part of the Commissioning Project, 1948–60 (with some later additions). Manuscripts and scores are located in LOu and the University of Louisville, University Archives and Records Center. C. Almand, Piano Concerto, John Gilbert: a Steamboat Overture ; G. Antheil, The Wish (opera); E. Bacon, Enchanted Isle ; H. Badings, Symphony no.7; C. Baker, The Glass Bead

Article

Jonas Westover

the parquet, the balcony, and three separate tiers. In addition to staging opera, it was constructed to present chamber music, solo performances, and theater works that also incorporated music. Many other such concert halls were built throughout the country, but few of the size or scope of the largest in New York. Opera houses of many shapes and sizes can be found everywhere in the United States. Some of the finest venues, such as the Metropolitan Opera House, were constructed to feature opera; others were originally built for other events or to serve as multipurpose

Article

Richard Colwell, James W. Pruett, Pamela Bristah, Richard J. Colwell and David G. Woods

vocal music was taught by specialists or teachers who could combine English and music—a minimum of two hours a week of vocal instruction at all grades. At the end of the eighth grade, all students were expected to be able to read any part of the average four-part composition assigned to eighth-grade pupils. At this time instrumental music was expanding, influenced by the tours of large city orchestras. Credit was given for all course work in high school. School offerings included choral, harmony, music history, orchestration, orchestra, and band. Ensembles for elementary

Article

Laurence Libin, Arnold Myers, Barbara Lambert and Albert R. Rice

instrument families in all pitch ranges made it desirable to obtain complete consorts, adding new varieties as they became fashionable. Fulfilling aristocratic demands for instruments of utmost magnificence, makers produced art objects worthy of display in private musei and Wunderkammern ; an impression of these studios survives in the intarsias that lined Federigo da Montefeltro's studios at Urbino and Gubbio. By commissioning elegant instruments towns and churches joined the nobility and rich merchants in demonstrating prosperity and good taste. All these factors encouraged

Article

Kelley Rourke

which was completed in September 2012 . In addition to providing space for its own programs, the Opera Center allows for the conduct of business (auditions, readings of new works, production meetings) by visiting opera professionals from across the country and around the world. OPERA America conducts and disseminates research on all aspects of the opera industry; its library houses unique collections related to American opera companies and repertory. The organization hosts an annual conference each year, as well as a number of smaller forums and workshops designed

Article

Anna-Lise P. Santella

women’s orchestras in American history. The Fadettes employed over 600 musicians performing thousands of concerts in the United States and abroad during its more than 30-year career with a repertoire that, according to Nichols, included “many symphonies” and “all the classic overtures of seventy-five grand operas.” The founding sextet gradually expanded to between 20 (for touring) and 50 members (for Boston-area performances). In 1897 the Fadettes were the resident orchestra for the summer season at Glen Echo, a National Chautauqua Assembly in Washington, DC. They

Article

Carli  

Richard Macnutt

including five by Paer and, in the 1820s, no fewer than 19 by Rossini. In 1823 a prospectus was issued for an edition of several Rossini operas in full score, but nothing came of this. Among Carli’s instrumental publications (again mainly by Italian composers) were numerous works for guitar by Carulli. The firm used a series of plate numbers (apparently chronological) that suggest that about 2500 publications were issued (all from engraved plates). There was evidently a close link with Richault, for each occasionally issued the other’s publications with the substitution

Article

Jehoash Hirshberg

other venues include the Ein Karem Music Centre, Dormition Abbey and the Scottish Church (St Andrew's), and there are also firework displays over the walls of the old city and other free outdoor events. The festival has had no clear artistic policy. Nearly every year a large-scale opera production, such as the Arena di Verona's Aida , is imported as an outdoor spectacle. The festival has regularly responded to salient changes in taste, demonstrated in its sponsorship of performances of Japanese and Indian music ( 1991 ), Moroccan trance-art ( 1994 ) and concerts given