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Vincent Duckles, Jann Pasler, Glenn Stanley, Thomas Christensen, Barbara H. Haggh, Robert Balchin, Laurence Libin, Tilman Seebass, Janet K. Page, Lydia Goehr, Bojan Bujic, Eric F. Clarke, Susan McClary, Jean Gribenski, Carolyn Gianturco, Pamela M. Potter, David Fallows, Miloš Velimirović, Gary Tomlinson, Gerard Béhague, Masakata Kanazawa and Peter Platt

Michael Morrow, Andrew Parrott and many others. The performance of 17th- and 18th-century opera, particularly the operas of Monteverdi, Purcell and Handel under Westrup at Oxford University from the 1920s onwards and under Anthony Lewis at Birmingham University in the 1940s to 1960s, was an important venture. Lewis, on the staff of the BBC from 1935 and in charge of music on the Third Programme in the mid-1940s, brought such music to a still wider public. The spirit of all these operatic ventures derived from the work and teaching of Dent, who saw performance as

Article

Barry S. Brook

Works , Hackensack, NJ, 1970 ) and Haydn (S.C. Bryant and G.W. Chapman: Melodic Index to Haydn’s Instrumental Music , New York, 1982 ). In recent decades there has been a tendency to create all-inclusive thematic catalogues that exceed existing ones in size and coverage. This development is in part a result of the work on RISM, which was originally intended to include all early music, printed and manuscript, up to 1800 (in some countries it has been extended to 1900 ). This ‘mega-catalogue’ expansion has been facilitated by advances in automation and has been

Article

Stanley Boorman

that they were related. The problem is even greater for later music: a bibliographer of opera, the Baroque cantata, or the 18th-century symphony or sonata is faced with almost intractable problems of defining the field, and of limiting the range of material to be included. There is also the problem of how far to range in terms of date and type of source. An attempt at listing all the manifestations of a genre will immediately run into this problem, as will a decision to list all the extant sources. The Census-Catalogue of Renaissance polyphonic manuscripts ( 1979–88

Article

Stanley Boorman, Eleanor Selfridge-Field and Donald W. Krummel

as it involved letterpress printing. Italian music, if it was printed at all, was printed abroad, usually in Amsterdam or London. J.S. Bach saw little of his music printed, almost all of it instrumental, with utilitarian titles such as ‘Übung’, while aspiring German publishers themselves, such as Johann Wilhelm Rönnagel, met with little success. In contrast, a study of the documents of the two dominant musical styles that were widespread throughout Europe in the 18th century – Neapolitan opera at the beginning and Viennese Classicism at the end – shows that manuscripts

Article

Gardane, 1604 ). 39 ff. 3 toccatas, 2 ricercares, and 5 toccatas ‘d’Incerto’ (i.e. anon.). Editions: F. Benetti (Padua, 1962 ); CEKM, xxxiv ( 1969 ). Literature: Judd, 1988Banchieri, Adriano: L’organo suonarino … opera terza decima (Venice: Ricciardo Amadino, 1605 ; 2/ 1611 , repr. 1620 , ‘opera ventesima quinta’; 3/ 1622 , repr. 1627 , 1638 , ‘opera xxxxiii … appresso Alessandro Vincenti’). 125, 105 and 159 pp. in the 3 editions respectively. Many liturgical and other pieces divided into 5 ‘registri’ (6 in the 3rd edn). Editions: AMI, iii ( 1959 ) [part edn];

Article

Jerome F. Weber

recordings. Despite its obvious association with the disc recording, the term is normally applied to lists of all types of recorded sound. Discography must be distinguished from cataloguing. Library catalogues describe the physical object, providing information found on the artefact and its accompanying printed material. Similarly, manufacturers' catalogues deal with the physical object offered for sale. The discographer goes beyond this information to establish all the facts that distinguish one recording from another or identify a recording issued in more than one format

Article

François Lesure, Roger Bowers, Barbara H. Haggh and André Vanrie

including the records of all central government departments, of parliament and of the higher courts of law, as well as archives of local governmental and judicial activity, at provincial, county and municipal level. Private archives arise from the activity of private businesses and organizations, institutions both ecclesiastical and lay, and individuals. They include the archives of all religious institutions, especially those of parish, collegiate, cathedral and monastic churches; the records of notarial and business organizations of all kinds; and archives accumulated

Article

. In 1592 Georg Willer published a list of the music publications of the preceding 28 years. Georg Draudius issued two similar catalogues in 1611 and 1625 in which all of the titles have been translated into Latin, causing considerable confusion to successive generations of bibliographers. In 1653 John Playford (i) ( see Playford family (1)) published A Catalogue of All the Musick Bookes … Printed in England , a list which contains most of the major publications of the first half of the century. Evidence of interest in antiquarian music, that

Article

Nigel Simeone and David A. Threasher

Symposion [ IV ]: Bruckner-Interpretation …: Bericht , Internationales Brucknerfest, ed. O. Wessely (Linz, 1983 ) [83:4508] Ljubljana Slovenska opera v evropskem okviru [The Slovenian opera within the European framework], Bicentenary Symposium, Slovenian Acad. of Sciences and Arts, ed. D. Cvetko and D. Pokorn (Ljubljana, 1982 ) [with Eng. summaries] London, ON Crosscurrents and the Mainstream of Italian Serious Opera, 1730-1790 , Dept of Music History at the U. of Western Ontario and others, SMC , vii ( 1982 ) [84:732] Los Angeles Sharing a Heritage: American

Article

Nigel Simeone

Symphonique de Paris. Since then the practice of providing programme notes for concerts and operas has become universal. Opera programmes for Covent Garden, the ENO and WNO, the Staatsoper and Volksoper in Vienna, the Paris Opéra and others often contain several essays by different writers exploring aspects of the work; those for the Opéra usually include a complete libretto. It was from programmes of this kind that two important series grew: in France L'avant-scène opéra began publication in 1976 and by 1996 had reached no.175, most numbers being multi-author

Article

Sydney Robinson Charles, George R. Hill, Norris L. Stephens and Julie Woodward

) are given for all entries; city and publisher are provided for those that are not part of series described in §2 below; the total number of volumes is given except when the edition is complete in one volume or seems to be in progress. Pacelli, A.: Opera omnia , ed. M. Gliński (Rome: De Santis, 1947 ) [inc.] Paganini, N.: Edizione nazionale delle opere (Rome: Istituto Italiano per la Storia della Musica, 1976 –) Palestrina, G.P. da: Opera omnia (Leipzig: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1862–1907 / R ), 33 vols.; ser. title does not appear on all vols. —— Le opere

Article

Steven Immel

complete Wagner operas – Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg , Tristan und Isolde and Parsifal – all created by Drei Masken Verlag of Munich between 1922 and 1925 . Of the four Beethoven piano sonatas that appeared, the Sonate appassionata (Paris, 1927 ), by Edition d'Art H. Piazza, is probably the most remarkable for its craftsmanship. The facsimile incorporated a full-colour process in which each ink was first matched with the original and then meticulously printed with multiple press passes, one colour at a time, recreating the original in all its detail (the

Article

Rita Benton

of entertainment (including opera and ballet) in London and elsewhere from about 1700 to the present. There are items of sheet music, posters and a collection of reference books on all aspects of stage history, costume, scenery and biography. Major acquisitions include the London Archives of the Dance, the Harry Beard Collection (particularly strong in European opera), the D’Oyly Carte Collection and the archive of the Arts Council of Great Britain. The museum routinely collects programmes and related reviews for drama, dance and opera productions staged at more than

Article

James B. Coover and John C. Franklin

and by librettists, and it also includes some oratorios and ballets. In all Stieger lists about 60,000 works. The most recent attempt in the apparently irresistible quest for truly comprehensive documentation of opera is the Edwin Mellen Opera Reference Index ( 1986 –), compiled by Charles H. Parsons. By the end of 1999 , 21 volumes had appeared. These include catalogues of composers (vols.i–iv) and librettists (vols.v–vi), a geographical index of premières (vols.vii–viii), a list of opera subjects (vol.ix), a discography (vols.x–xii), indexes of casts for premières

Article

Otto E. Albrecht and Stephen Roe

collection, however, had been obtained by James Osborn and is now in US-NHub . Schumer, Harry G. ( d 1971 ). The large collection of the former librarian of the Metropolitan Opera, including printed and MS full scores and vocal scores of hundreds of operas, operettas and ballets, was purchased by US-NYp in 1975 . Some 60 scores were copied by Schumer himself, collating all available variant editions. Schwarzenberg, Prince Ernst of. The former princely music library, previously at Kroměříž, is now at CZ-K . Schwencke, Christian Friedrich

Article

Jennifer Post and David A. Threasher

Bibliotek in Copenhagen; it moved to the National Museum in 1942 and moved to its present location in 1989 . In 1998 the archive became the legal deposit archive for recordings in Denmark. Besides general recordings (with an emphasis on complete opera recordings), the library maintains a collection of almost all Danish recordings made from the beginning of the 20th century. Éire Irish Traditional Music Archive/Taisce Cheol Dúchais Éireann, 63 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. The largest collection of Irish traditional music, founded in 1987

Article

Editing  

James Grier

entered a correction in autograph, its authenticity can be verified, but readings that are not changed do not signify that the composer checked them all carefully and ascertained their correctness. Performing materials that are contemporary with the composer can transmit a variety of information, including substantive changes to the text that arose from the circumstances of performance: this is particularly true of operas, where the original performing materials may differ substantially from the autographs (as they do, for example, for Le nozze di Figaro and Carmen

Article

Nigel Simeone

societies, opera companies and publishing houses have all been the subject of volumes produced to celebrate important landmarks. Performing organizations have sometimes used an important anniversary as the opportunity to produce a Festschrift which consists of detailed documentation of their activity: useful examples include the 50th anniversary publications of the Vienna PO (Richard von Perger's Denkschrift zur Feier des Fünfzigjährigen unterbrochenen Bestandes der Philharmonischen Konzerte in Wien 1860–1910 , Vienna and Leipzig, 1910 ) and of the Vienna Opera ( 50 Jahre

Article

Stephen M. Fry

first-class presort 14 March 1997 ) “The Stars and Stripes Forever” [uniformed musician with trumpet], 32¢ ( 21 July 1997 ) Lily Pons, American Music Series, Opera Singers Issue, 32¢ ( 10 Sept 1997 ) Richard Tucker, American Music Series, Opera Singers Issue, 32¢ ( 10 Sept 1997 ) Lawrence Tibbett, American Music Series, Opera Singers Issue, 32¢ ( 10 Sept 1997 ) Rosa Ponselle, American Music Series, Opera Singers Issue, 32¢ ( 10 Sept 1997 ) Leopold Stokowski, Classical Composers and Conductors Issue, 32¢ ( 12 Sept, 1997 ) Arthur Fiedler, Classical Composers

Article

Laurence Libin, Arnold Myers, Barbara Lambert and Albert R. Rice

instrument families in all pitch ranges made it desirable to obtain complete consorts, adding new varieties as they became fashionable. Fulfilling aristocratic demands for instruments of utmost magnificence, makers produced art objects worthy of display in private musei and Wunderkammern ; an impression of these studios survives in the intarsias that lined Federigo da Montefeltro's studios at Urbino and Gubbio. By commissioning elegant instruments towns and churches joined the nobility and rich merchants in demonstrating prosperity and good taste. All these factors encouraged