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Article

Carole Rosen

Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, in partnership with Augustus Harris. In 1887 the Carl Rosa Opera was turned into a limited liability company, and so was able to survive the death of its founder in Paris in April 1889 at the age of 47. Indeed, such was the success of the company in the great industrial cities, presenting opera in the language of the audience, with subscription tickets at all prices, that three Carl Rosa touring troupes were set up. In October 1892 the Grand Opera Company received the royal accolade with a performance of La fille du régiment at Balmoral

Article

Administration and the Civil Works Administration. Under the able leadership of its first national director, Nikolai Sokoloff ( 1935–9 ), the project focussed on the employment of musicians as performers in orchestras, concert and dance bands, chamber music and choral ensembles, and opera companies. Statistics for the period January 1936 to April 1940 show 250,000 performances reaching an audience of 159 million. At its peak in 1936 , the project employed over 15,000 people in 42 states and the District of Columbia. Other activities sponsored by the project included

Article

Anna-Lise P. Santella

women’s orchestras in American history. The Fadettes employed over 600 musicians performing thousands of concerts in the United States and abroad during its more than 30-year career with a repertoire that, according to Nichols, included “many symphonies” and “all the classic overtures of seventy-five grand operas.” The founding sextet gradually expanded to between 20 (for touring) and 50 members (for Boston-area performances). In 1897 the Fadettes were the resident orchestra for the summer season at Glen Echo, a National Chautauqua Assembly in Washington, DC. They

Article

Robert Philip and Tully Potter

Léner Quartet Hungarian string quartet. Its members all studied at the National Hungarian Royal Academy of Music in Budapest. Jenö Léner, the leader, Joseph Smilovits, the second violinist, and Sandor Roth, the viola player, were pupils of Jenő Hubay; Imre Hartman, the cellist, was a pupil of David Popper. At the outbreak of revolution in 1918 the four musicians, by this time members of the Budapest Opera orchestra, retired to a remote Hungarian village to study chamber music. A year later they made their début in Budapest. In 1920 they appeared in Vienna before

Article

Mark A. Boyle

Erden its first American performance. Conductors toward the end of the 20th century, including Amy Kaiser ( 1983–95 ), Kent Tritle ( 1996–2004 ), and James Bagwell ( 2004–10 ), continued the Dessoff mission of performing rare works and prepared the ensemble for collaborations with the Opera Orchestra of New York, the Budapest Festival Orchestra, and the New York Philharmonic. In 2010 , Australian conductor and Bach scholar Christopher Shepard assumed artistic leadership of the Dessoff Choirs. See also Early-music revival . Bibliography

Article

Robert Philip

Budapest Quartet String quartet of Hungarian origin. The original members were Emil Hauser, Imre Poganyi, Istvan Ipolyi and Harry Son, all of whom played in the orchestra at the Royal Hungarian Opera House. They gave their first concert in 1917 at Kolozsvar (now Cluj-Napoca). Their European tours during the 1920s included visits to London, first in 1925 when their performances of Bartók’s First Quartet and Smetana’s Quartet in E minor were admired for their fine ensemble and depth of feeling. During the quartet’s subsequent history, the membership changed

Article

Tully Potter

Casals among their teachers, played with refulgent tone and deep musicality but – under his influence – always with a light touch. For a time all three taught at the University of Indiana School of Music. When Guilet retired in 1969 he was replaced by Isidore Cohen, a former member of the Schneider and Juilliard Quartets. This formation of the ensemble toured indefatigably and recorded a vast range of music, including all the trios of Haydn and the Mozart and Brahms piano quartets (with Bruno Giuranna and Walter Trampler respectively). The Mozart, Beethoven and

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Timişoara , under the name Romanian State Opera from Cluj in Timişoara. Since its founding the Opera has produced over 200 operas, operettas, and ballets, of all schools and styles including over 40 Romanian works, many of them premières, most notably Oedipus by George Enescu and Meşterul Manole (‘Master Manole’) by Sigismund Toduţă . Since 1971 the Opera has performed with success in a series of tours throughout Western Europe, as well as in England, Turkey, Korea, Bulgaria, Ukraine, and the former Czechoslovakia.

Article

Milena Bozhikova

recordings for Bulgarian National Radio, Bulgarian National Television, and has self-released some recordings. In 1999 the Varna Philharmonic Orchestra merged with the Opera and continued to operate as a public cultural institution under the new name Opera and Philharmonic Society of Varna. After 2010 the two groups split and the opera’s name was changed to the State Opera.

Article

Tully Potter

Budapest, 25 Oct 1935 ), Sándor Devich ( b Szeged, 19 Jan 1935 ), Géza Németh ( b Beregszász [now Beregovo, Ukraine], 23 July 1936 ) and László Mező, all students in Leó Weiner's chamber music class at the Liszt Academy of Music in Budapest. At first they performed as the Komlós Quartet – making their Budapest début in 1958 – and played in orchestras, the leader and viola player as principals of the State Opera Orchestra and the second violinist in the Hungarian State Orchestra. In 1960 Károly Botvay ( b Sopron, 29 Dec 1932 ) replaced Mező and in 1963 they

Article

John Spitzer and Neal Zaslaw

Jean-Baptiste Lully's rise to power at the French court had profound musical implications, not just in France but for all of Europe. In 1653 , at the age of 20, Lully was appointed compositeur de la musique instrumentale , which made him leader of his own violin band, the Petite Bande (Petits Violons, Violons du Cabinet). In 1664 he was made head of the Grande Bande (the 24 Violons du Roi). In 1672 he took over the Académie Royale de Musique (the Paris Opéra). The Grande Bande had 24, the Petite Bande perhaps 18 string players; for large-scale court performances Lully

Article

Raoul F. Camus

1901 , and 1903 , and a world tour, 1910–11 . The typical Sousa program usually listed nine compositions, ranging from his own suites, selections, and marches, to novelty numbers and solos, to orchestral transcriptions and opera arias and the most recent contemporary music such as selections from Parsifal a decade before its Metropolitan Opera premiere. His printed programs are deceiving, however: after each listed title Sousa would normally add one or two encores, so that a program with nine selections might actually contain as many as 30. The encores were always

Article

Charles K. Wolfe and Gregory N. Reish

of bluegrass into a versatile and eclectic idiom. Bibliography D. Rhodes : “The Stability and Versatility of the Seldom Scene,” Bluegrass Unlimited , 15/1 (1980), 14–19 P. Parsons : “The Seldom Scene: All This and Fun, Too,” Bluegrass Unlimited , 29/6 (1994), 16–29 B. Weintraub : “The Seldom Scene: Still Picking After All These Years,” Bluegrass Unlimited , 38/4 (2003), 28–32 External references The editorially selected link below is provided by our partner Alexander Street Press (ASP) and requires a subscription to their site

Article

Claude Conyers

dancing by their father and grandfather and trained in ballet by various teachers. All three were instrumental in establishing and popularizing ballet in the western United States. Willam Farr Christensen ( b Brigham City, UT , Aug 27, 1902 ; d Salt Lake City , Oct 14, 2001 ) was the eldest of the brothers. After touring the vaudeville circuit, he opened a ballet school in 1932 in Portland, Oregon, from which sprang the Portland Ballet. In 1937 he joined the San Francisco Opera Ballet, where, as ballet-master, he staged the first full-length American productions

Article

Karen Ahlquist

Mendelssohn, Weber, and later Brahms composed Männerchöre, and Silcher arranged songs by Schubert for this medium. Opera choruses-even full productions-were performed, as were mixed-chorus works, for which Damenchöre were established. Männerchöre proliferated in the USA up to World War I, when their numbers declined in response to anti-German sentiment. Several of the oldest Männerchöre are active today, however some are mixed choruses and others remain all male. Bibliography T. Albrecht : “The Music Libraries of the German Singing Societies in