1-5 of 5 results  for:

  • All : Caterina Assandra x
Clear all

Article

Robert L. Kendrick

Bibliography G. Borsieri : Il sopplimento della Nobiltà di Milano (Milan, 1619), 56 C. Gianturco : ‘Caterina Assandra, suora compositrice’, La musica sacra in Lombardia nella prima metà del Seicento: Como 1985 , 117–27 J. Bowers : ‘The Emergence of Women Composers in Italy, 1566–1700’, Women Making Music: the Western Art Tradition, 1150–1959 , ed. J. Bowers and J. Tick (Urbana, 1986), 116–67 J. Bowers : ‘Caterina Assandra’, Women Composers: Music through the Ages , ed. S. Glickman and M.F. Schleifer , 1 (New York, 1996), 330–40 [incl

Image

Violoncello cello I. Origins and history to c1700 3. Repertory.: Ex.1 Caterina Assandra: ‘O salutaris hostia’, from Motetti à due e tre voci, op.2 (Milan, 1609) Violoncello cello I. Origins and history to c1700 3. Repertory.: Ex.1 Caterina Assandra: ‘O salutaris hostia’, from Motetti à due e tre voci, op.2 (Milan, 1609)

Article

Violone  

Tharald Borgir, Stephen Bonta and Alfred Planyavsky

gamba’, tuned G ′– C – F – A – d – g (a 5th below the normal six-string bass viol), and to a larger instrument, ‘violone del contra-basso’, tuned D ′– G ′– C – E – A – d . It is not clear when the term ‘violone’ first became associated with the bass violin. The bass part of Caterina Assandra’s motet O Salutaris hodie ( Motetti op.2, Milan, 1609 ), which employs the typical Baroque trio scoring for strings, calls for a ‘violone’; this was probably the early, larger form of the bass violin, as opposed to Banchieri’s violone da gamba. The first known instance of the

Article

Stephen Bonta, Suzanne Wijsman, Margaret Campbell, Barry Kernfeld and Anthony Barnett

1609 ) by Caterina Assandra, a nun at the convent of S Agata, Lomello, near Milan, has a violone part with a very limited range, F – c ′, and could be performed in first position on either size of bass violin or on some kind of bass viol ( ex.1 ). The second, the Concerti ecclesiastici by G.P. Cima, was published the following year, and contains a Sonata per violino e violone . Here the writing is somewhat more demanding in terms of fluency of execution ( ex.2 ). The range of Cima's part for violone C – d ′ indicates that at least one of Assandra's contemporaries

Article

Milan  

Mariangela Donà

churches with musical establishments, among them S Maria della Scala, S Ambrogio, S Marco, S Simpliciano, S Celso and S Eufemia, and in the convents. The strict polyphonic style gave way to a more expressive style using a few voices and continuo. Among local composers was the nun Caterina Assandra, who published a collection of motets in the new concertato style in Milan in 1609 . In so austere a climate there was little opportunity for the development of opera. However, some public festivities with music were arranged when distinguished visitors came to the city. In