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Vivaldi, Antonio (Lucio)free

  • Michael Talbot
  • , revised by Nicholas Lockey

(b Venice, 4 March 1678; d Vienna, 27/8 July 1741). Italian composer. The most original and influential Italian composer of his generation, he laid the foundations for the mature Baroque concerto. His contributions to musical style, violin technique, and the practice of orchestration were substantial, and he was a pioneer of orchestral programme music.

1. Early years.

Vivaldi’s father Giovanni Battista (1655–1736), a tailor’s son, was born in Brescia. He moved with his widowed mother in 1666 to Venice, where he practised as a barber before becoming a professional violinist in early adulthood. Ten children, of whom Antonio was the second-eldest (a recently uncovered elder sister having died at less than two years of age), are known to have been born to his union with Camilla Calicchio (1653–1728), a tailor’s daughter, whom he married in June 1676. None of Antonio’s brothers and sisters became musicians, although Francesco (1690–1752) emulated his elder brother’s entrepreneurial spirit by adding to his main calling of barber those of paving contractor and publisher. Of Antonio’s extended family, his nephews Carlo Stefano Vivaldi (b 1690) and Danielle Mauro (b 1717) became music copyists while another nephew, Pietro Mauro (detto ‘Il Vivaldi’; 1715–92), was a highly successful copyist following a brief career as a singer and impresario. On 23 April 1685 Giovanni Battista was engaged as a violinist at S Marco under the surname of Rossi. This suggests that red hair, which was to earn Antonio the sobriquet of ‘il prete rosso’ (‘the red priest’), was a family characteristic. In the same year Giovanni Battista became a founder-member of the Sovvegno di S Cecilia. He became sufficiently esteemed as a violinist to be listed alongside his celebrated son in Coronelli’s Guida de’ forestieri and he served, from 1689 to 1693, as maestro di strumenti to the Ospedale dei Mendicanti. He was from time to time involved in operatic management, such as when he and Antonio operated as co-impresarios during the 1713–14 and 1714–15 seasons at the Teatro Sant’Angelo. Giovanni Battista certainly travelled widely, often with Antonio, to play the violin at church festivals. He may even have been a composer: La fedeltà sfortunata, an opera attributed to one G.B. Rossi, was performed at an unidentified Venetian theatre in 1688–9. On 30 September 1729, he was granted a year’s leave from S Marco to accompany a son (presumably Antonio) to Germany. Father and son worked in the closest collaboration: the hand of Antonio’s principal copyist, from the mid-1710s to the mid-1730s, is believed to be that of Giovanni Battista, with whom he shared a succession of apartments in Venice.

Antonio was baptized officially on 6 May 1678. Because the life of the newborn infant was thought to be in danger the midwife had performed a provisional baptism on the day of his birth; a possible cause was the earthquake which shook Venice on 4 March, but it is more likely that the ailment which the composer claimed to have afflicted him from birth was already manifesting itself. This condition (‘strettezza di petto’ was how Vivaldi described it) is generally identified with bronchial asthma. Although Vivaldi as an adult was evidently determined not to let it prevent him from undertaking frequent and arduous journeys, even if that meant maintaining a large and expensive entourage, its physical and particularly its psychological effect on him should not be underestimated.

Between 18 September 1693 (the date of his tonsure) and 23 March 1703 (the date of his ordination) Vivaldi was trained for the priesthood at the local churches of S Geminiano and S Giovanni in Oleo while continuing to live with his family in the parish of S Martino. This vocation may have been at least partly inspired by the example of his uncle, Giovanni Francesco Temporini (c. 1633–92), who was the highly regarded parish priest of the Vivaldi family’s parish church of S Giovanni in Bragora. Antonio probably learnt the violin from his father, for whom he is said to have occasionally deputized at S Marco; his participation as a ‘supernumerary’ violinist in Christmas services at the basilica in 1696 is his earliest known public appearance. A few years after his ordination (probably in late 1706) he ceased for good to say Mass, thereby sacrificing a useful income as a house priest (mansionario) at the Pietà. In 1737, while under censure for conduct unbecoming a priest, he blamed this failure on his ailment, but it is not hard also to suspect an opportunist motive in view of his immersion in musical activities. Perhaps his defence is slightly strengthened by a fanciful early 19th-century report of his temporary retirement to the sacristy during celebration of Mass (if one chooses to discount the explanation that his purpose was to write down a fugue). Outwardly Vivaldi remained pious, and even traded on his status as a priest. The religious motto ‘Laus Deo’ (abbreviated as L.D.) and an expanded version ‘LDBMDA’, usually found in monogram form and possibly standing for ‘Laus Deo Beataeque Mariae Deiparae Amen’, occur with great frequency at the head of his scores – strange to say, particularly those of operas. From Goldoni’s account of a meeting with Vivaldi in 1735 we glimpse the composer taking refuge from a rather unwelcome confrontation in mechanical recitation from his breviary.

2. Appointment at the Pietà.

In September 1703 Vivaldi obtained his first official post, becoming maestro di violino at the comfortable but unremarkable annual salary of 60 ducats at the Pio Ospedale della Pietà, one of four Venetian institutions devoted to the care of orphaned, abandoned, and indigent children and specializing in the musical training of those among the girls who showed aptitude. Services with music – one might almost call them concerts – at the Pietà were a focal point in the social calendar of the Venetian nobility and foreign visitors, and it was essential to ensure both the competent instruction and rehearsal of the young musicians and the regular supply of new works for them. Vivaldi owed his appointment to a request made earlier that year by the Pietà’s maestro di coro (musical director) Francesco Gasparini that violin and oboe masters be engaged. In August 1704, 40 ducats were added to his salary in consideration of his teaching of the viole all’inglese – now known to be traditional viols, which were still used on occasion at the Pietà and elsewhere; a set of six instruments was loaned to the Pietà from 1706 to 1726 and Vivaldi wrote for the instrument in his oratorio Juditha triumphans and the opera L’Incoronazione di Dario. To Vivaldi fell in addition the task of acquiring new string instruments for the orchestra and maintaining those already in use. The governors renewed his post annually until February 1709, when a majority voted on a second ballot against retaining him. It seems less probable that Vivaldi was dismissed from his post on grounds of incapacity or misconduct, or through personal animosity, than that the post itself was temporarily discontinued, perhaps in the interests of economy. The orchestra would certainly be left in capable hands, for the Pietà’s teachers had deputies (maestre di coro) assigned to them; these were the foremost performers among the girls and women, and some of them (for example, the Anna Maria commemorated in the title of several of Vivaldi’s violin and viola d’amore concertos) attained fame beyond the Pietà’s walls. In addition, an élite group of a dozen women, the figlie privilegiate di coro, were responsible for teaching their younger fellow inmates and were even allowed to take pupils from outside. Ironically, Vivaldi’s very success in building up a cadre of seasoned performers may have contributed to his redundancy. This explanation gains support from the fact that the comparable post of teacher of wind instruments was left unfilled for long periods, and that during his lifetime no other violin teacher was ever appointed, although teachers of the cello, beginning with Antonio Vandini (sometimes confused in the Pietà’s records with Vivaldi – whose name did, however, appear anagramatically as Lotavio Vandini in the libretto of Aristide, probably as a satirical reference rather than as a record of authorship), were employed between 1720 and 1731.

Meanwhile, Vivaldi was seeking recognition as a composer. The earliest extant edition of his op.1, a set of 12 chamber sonatas in the trio medium, is that by Sala dated 1705 and dedicated to Count Annibale Gambara, a Brescian nobleman. That edition describes Vivaldi on the title-page as ‘Musico di violino, professore veneto’, making no mention of his appointment at the Pietà but acknowledging his status as a priest by use of the title ‘Don’; it could be a reprint of a lost original edition dating from 1703, though the inclusion of a letter of dedication implies otherwise. His op.2, consisting of violin sonatas, was hurriedly dedicated in 1709 to Frederik IV of Denmark during the king’s brief visit to Venice. By then Vivaldi was also writing concertos, which circulated in manuscript, in addition to vocal works – a lost serenata from July 1708 and possible contributions to an opera (also lost) for the autumn 1705 season.

Vivaldi was voted back into his former post at the Pietà in September 1711 and was reappointed against steadily mounting opposition every year until March 1716, when the required majority of two-thirds was not obtained. Surprisingly, in May 1716 he was appointed to a position of nominally greater responsibility, maestro de’ concerti. The departure, in April 1713, of Gasparini on a sick leave from which he never returned gave Vivaldi an opportunity to write sacred music, for Pietro Scarpari, the singing master, was only a modest composer. The governors were so pleased with Vivaldi’s efforts that in June 1715 they awarded him the choirmaster’s customary annual bonus of 50 ducats in respect of ‘an entire mass, a vespers, an oratorio, over 30 motets and other labours’. In 1716 Vivaldi followed his earlier Moyses Deus Pharaonis with a new oratorio, Juditha triumphans, which contained patriotic references to Venice’s war against the Turks. This was probably the most elaborate work he ever wrote for the Pietà.

In 1711 Etienne Roger, the Amsterdam publisher, brought out what was to become the most influential music publication of the first half of the 18th century: Vivaldi’s L’estro armonico op.3, dedicated to Grand Prince Ferdinando of Tuscany; it comprised 12 concertos divided equally into works for one, two, and four solo violins. The change to Roger from local publishers, which several other eminent Italian composers made about the same time, reflected not only the superiority of the engraving process over the printing from type still normally used in Italy (a superiority acknowledged in Vivaldi’s preface to L’estro armonico) but also the enormous growth in demand for the latest Italian music in northern Europe. The third, fifth, and 12th concertos from op.3 (along with the concerto published individually under the title ‘The Cuckow’, rv335), became staples of the repertoire of many violinists, were arranged for a variety of instruments, and were extracted for use in violin tutors throughout the 18th century and beyond. Nowhere was the enthusiasm for Vivaldi’s concertos stronger than in Germany. Bach transcribed several of them (including five from op.3) for keyboard, and his noble patron Prince Johann Ernst of Saxe-Weimar wrote concertos in Vivaldi’s style. German musicians visiting Venice such as Stölzel (1713–14), Heinichen (1713–16), and Pisendel (1716–17) sought him out. Pisendel, who studied violin and composition with Vivaldi, copied out several of his sonatas and concertos and also received autograph scores of many works directly from the master, who continued to have close relations with the Saxon court. Quantz, who first heard Vivaldi’s concertos at Pirna in 1714, gave him credit in his Anweisung for having reformed the concerto (together with Albinoni); the formula for composing a concerto set out by Quantz conforms in every particular to Vivaldi’s normal practice.

La stravaganza op.4, a set of 12 violin concertos, was dedicated in about 1716 to Vettor Delfino (Dolfin), a young pupil of Vivaldi from the Venetian nobility. The next three publications (opp.5–7, comprising six sonatas and 18 concertos), belonging to the years 1716–20, were left undedicated: apparently Roger ordered works from the composer and had them engraved at his own expense (in the case of op.7, however, Roger appears to have filled out the collection with concertos erroneously attributed to Vivaldi), which shows Vivaldi’s exceptional popularity – this procedure, later in the century to become normal, was still rather rare.

Around the time of his earliest publications, Vivaldi followed his father into the turbulent world of opera. Recently discovered court documents reveal that Antonio sought payment for having written the overture and closed vocal numbers for Creso tolto a le fiamme (S Angelo, autumn 1705), an opera attributed to Girolamo Polani. Polani did not dispute Vivaldi’s claim of authorship, although he argued that he had, in turn, written a serenata for a performance in Rovigo on Vivaldi’s behalf. While Vivaldi’s first publicly acknowledged stage work, Ottone in villa, was performed at the summer resort of Vicenza in May 1713, he initially established himself, as both a composer and an impresario, at the small, somewhat unfashionable Venetian theatre of S Angelo (although it contracted as scene painters Bernardo Canal and sons). Starting with the autumn 1713 season, Vivaldi assembled pasticcios, adapted operas by other composers (including gradually replacing Giovanni Alberto Ristori’s music with his own in productions of Grazio Braccioli’s Orlando furioso), and introduced several of his own works. It was probably Luca Antonio Predieri’s opera Lucio Papirio (carnival 1715, dedication signed by Vivaldi) that the Frankfurt lawyer J.F.A. von Uffenbach heard on 4 February 1715, when he noted in his diary that Vivaldi was the ‘entrepreneur’ (mistakenly believing him also to be the composer), and he returned to the same theatre in the following weeks for three performances of the pasticcio, Nerone fatto Cesare. Vivaldi’s own Orlando finto pazzo (libretto by Braccioli) opened the autumn 1714 season and two new operas (Arsilda, regina di Ponto and L’incoronazione di Dario) followed up to 1717. Between 1716 and 1718 he also wrote three operas for the S Moisè theatre; in addition, there were some revivals.

3. Years of travel.

In April 1718 Vivaldi took his recently composed opera Armida al campo d’Egitto to Mantua, where he stayed until 1720. During that time he wrote three operas for performance in the 1719 and 1720 carnival seasons. The Governor of Mantua (for the Habsburgs) was Prince Philip of Hesse-Darmstadt, a noted music lover. Vivaldi became his maestro di cappella da camera, a curiously worded title (probably meaning ‘director of secular music’) that he retained after leaving Mantua. He wrote several cantatas and serenatas for the Mantuan court.

Having briefly returned to Venice, Vivaldi was soon off to Rome, where, according to two letters of 1737 to Guido Bentivoglio d’Aragona, he spent three carnival seasons and was invited twice to play before the pope. Three operas performed in Rome during the 1723 and 1724 carnival seasons are known, and it is possible that the other season for which Vivaldi wrote was that of 1720, when he contributed an act to a pasticcio, Tito Manlio, performed at the Teatro della Pace. Pier Leone Ghezzi’s famous caricature of Vivaldi was drawn during Carnival 1723 when Ercole su ’l Termodonte was being staged. While in Rome, Vivaldi came into contact with Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni, Corelli’s former patron; numerous concertos and a handsome volume of violin sonatas in Manchester can be traced back to Ottoboni’s library. In July 1723 the Pietà governors agreed to ask Vivaldi to supply the orchestra with two concertos every month (at one sequin each), sending them by post if necessary, and to direct three or four rehearsals of them when in Venice. The institution’s accounts confirm payment to him for over 140 concertos between 1723 and 1729. As a composer Vivaldi was evidently a major asset to the Pietà, notwithstanding his frequent travels, which ruled out a teaching post.

It was around this time that Vivaldi’s association with the contralto Anna Girò must have begun. She was the daughter of a Mantuan wigmaker of French origin and became his singing pupil. Between 1723 and 1748 she appeared regularly on the operatic stage, especially in Venice. Goldoni thought her voice weak but conceded that she was a good actress and had an attractive appearance. The alterations made by Goldoni at Vivaldi’s insistence to Zeno’s original libretto for Griselda show that Vivaldi was aware of his pupil’s limitations. Both Anna and her substantially older half-sister Paolina (who acted as her chaperone) were loyal members of his entourage. Tongues inevitably wagged, and it was widely believed that Anna Girò was Vivaldi’s mistress, despite his plausible denials and their separate domiciles.

From 1726 to 1728 Vivaldi was again active as a composer and impresario at S Angelo. At the same time his instrumental works were continuing to spread his reputation. Il cimento dell’armonia e dell’inventione op.8 (opening with the four concertos portraying the seasons) appeared by 1725 and was dedicated to his Bohemian patron Count Wenzel von Morzin (a distant relative of the Morzin who employed Haydn). La cetra op.9 was dedicated to Emperor Charles VI, whom Vivaldi met in September 1728 at Lipica (Lippiza) and Trieste, and from whom he received a golden chain with a medallion and, reportedly, much money. (The 12 different concertos also entitled La cetra and dated 1728 in a manuscript in Vienna may commemorate the musical performances associated with that meeting; the published La cetra appeared earlier, in 1727.) The pioneering flute concertos of op.10 and the string concertos of opp.11 and 12 were issued by Le Cène in 1729. Although the publisher bore the costs of all five collections, Vivaldi was evidently dissatisfied with the financial returns, for in 1733 he told the English traveller Edward Holdsworth of his decision not to have any more concertos published as this inhibited his more profitable trade in manuscripts, for which the current price was a guinea per concerto; and indeed no work of his published after op.12 appeared with his proven consent (op.13, Il pastor fido, is a clever pastiche by the French musette player Nicolas Chédeville, while a presumably equally spurious op.14 was announced in Paris but never appeared).

Between late 1729 and early 1731 Vivaldi and his father travelled through central Europe. Perhaps the invitation to Vienna cited in a letter of 1737 relates to this period, as his opera Argippo was given in early 1730 at that city’s Kärntnertortheater. He may well have visited Prague (where since 1724 an opera company headed by the Venetian singer Antonio Denzio had been active at the court of Count Sporck), as several operas utilizing his music were given there between autumn 1730 and spring 1732, beginning with a version of Argippo. Vivaldi also wrote at least three works (rv82, 85, and 93), all featuring lute and penned on paper originating from central Europe, for Count Johann Joseph von Wrtby (Jan Josef Vrtba), who maintained a home in Prague.

During the period 1733–5 he wrote several operas for S Angelo and one for the Grimani theatre of S Samuele to which Goldoni was attached. His entrepreneurial activities in Venice seem mainly to have petered out; instead, he increasingly promoted opera in smaller mainland centres like Verona, Ancona, Reggio nell’Emilia, and Ferrara. From Farnace (1731, Pavia) onwards Vivaldi styled himself maestro di cappella of François III (Francis Stephen), Duke of Lorraine and (from 1737) Grand Duke of Tuscany, the future Emperor Francis I. This title was primarily honorific, although evidence is growing that Francis Stephen, himself a violinist, was an admirer of Vivaldi’s music and may have provided support here and there; a recently discovered letter confirms that Vivaldi sent music to Francis Stephen in 1729 and they may have met on one or more occasions. Meanwhile, he was reinstated at the Pietà as maestro di cappella in August 1735. The governors now wished to take a firmer line on his travelling, and his renewed absences probably contributed to his failure to gain reappointment in March 1738. His links were not severed, however: when Friedrich Christian, Crown Prince of Saxony-Poland, visited the Pietà on 21 March 1740 Vivaldi was asked to supply and direct the performance of three concertos (rv540, 552, 558) and one sinfonia (rv149); the scores, mostly autograph, were taken back to Dresden. During the interregnum between maestri di coro Giovanni Porta (1726–37) and Gennaro d’Alessandro (1739–40) he also sold the Pietà numerous sacred vocal works.

Vivaldi was on close terms with Guido Bentivoglio d’Aragona, a marquis from Ferrara. He enlisted Bentivoglio’s support to stage operas at Ferrara during the carnival seasons of 1737, 1738, and 1739; 13 letters by Vivaldi to Bentivoglio and copies of several replies by the marquis, most of which are in the Bentivoglio archives, provide, among other things, an illuminating record of these three essays (all of them less than successful in their different ways) in opera promotion. In 1737 there were wrangles over a singer’s contract and the choice of operas, and an unseemly attempt by Vivaldi to exact the maximum payment. In 1738 Cardinal Tomaso Ruffo, Archbishop of Ferrara (a papal domain), forbade Vivaldi to enter Ferrara, ostensibly on account of his relationship with Anna Girò and his refusal to say Mass, so that he was compelled to put the enterprise in the hands of local impresarios in whom he had little confidence. In 1739 Vivaldi, who was in Venice supervising the performances of Feraspe, paid dearly for his absence from Ferrara. The first opera, Siroe, was criticized for faults in its recitatives (because, Vivaldi bitterly claimed, of alterations arbitrarily introduced by the harpsichordist, Pietro Antonio Berretta) with the result that the theatre’s patrons refused to mount Farnace, the second opera. Bentivoglio was sympathetic but too diplomatic to intervene.

De Brosses, who met Vivaldi in autumn 1739, found his stock low with the Venetian public. That may be one reason why Vivaldi was persuaded to undertake his last journey in 1740 (the ground for which may have been prepared by Anna Girò’s visits to Graz in 1739 and 1740 to sing in operas presented by Angelo Mingotti’s company). On 29 April (not August) 1740 the Pietà governors, having got wind of his imminent departure, rejected a motion to buy ‘a certain portion of concertos’ from him; they must have relented, however, as on 12 May he was paid for 20 concertos. It appears that Vivaldi’s departure was connected with the intended production of one or more operas at the Kärntnertortheater in Vienna. The death of Charles VI in October 1740 and the ensuing closure of all Viennese theatres for the duration of the following carnival must have frustrated this plan, but Vivaldi, perhaps too ill or too poor to return to Venice, lingered on in the city. Recent evidence suggests his status in Vienna was not as low as once believed; he may have hoped his connections to noble patrons would support him until the theatres re-opened. On 5 May 1741 he wrote to Count Johann Friedrich of Oettingen-Wallerstein, offering a series of six flute concertos (today lost), each in a distinct national style, three of which were later included in a 1759 Dutch inventory. On 28 June 1741 he signed a receipt for the sale of several concertos to Count Antonio Vinciguerra di Collalto. On 27 or 28 July he died in an apartment next to the Kärntnertortheater, and was given an ordinary, simple burial (not a pauper’s burial) on the latter day at the Hospital Burial Ground (Spettaler Gottesacker). A statement in a contemporary Venetian commonplace book (Commemoriali Gradenigo) which notes that Vivaldi, who had once earned 50,000 ducats (presumably annually) but died in poverty through his prodigality, may be at least partly coloured by personal bias. Anna Girò, who had accompanied him, returned to Venice and continued her career; his opera L’oracolo in Messenia was produced posthumously, possibly to open the new Burgtheater in 1742.

4. Reputation.

Vivaldi was so unconventional a man and musician that he was bound to elicit much adverse comment in his lifetime. His vanity was notorious: he boasted of his fame and illustrious patrons, and of his fluency in composition, asserting before De Brosses that he could compose a concerto in all its parts more quickly than it could be copied. In many cases these claims were clearly exaggerated. He told Holdsworth, for example, that 17 (not 12) collections by him had been published, rather deceitfully counting double each opus divided into two volumes. His claim to Bentivoglio in 1739 that he had composed 94 operas (even the most generous inclusion of pasticcios, revisions, revivals, and insertions for operas by other composers still falls short of 80) needs to be interpreted in this light. Along with his vanity went an extreme sensitivity to criticism, which comes out even in the dedications of his opp.1 and 4, where one sees a phrase such as ‘i miei sudori forse malignati dalla critica’ (‘my efforts, which are perhaps spoken ill of by the critics’). His preoccupation with money was excessive by most standards: it is a subject that surfaces continually in his letters to Bentivoglio. Holdsworth and De Brosses found that Vivaldi drove a hard bargain with foreign visitors. Yet the sheer zest of the man compelled admiration. De Brosses wrote of his ‘furie de composition’, and Goldoni painted a charming picture of the old man’s enthusiasm on seeing the aria text his visitor had penned before his very eyes. If the well-known engraving of him by François Morellon La Cave (and its imitation by James Caldwall) conveys all too successfully his self-satisfaction, the anonymous painting in Bologna of an unnamed violinist believed to be Vivaldi shows a more sympathetic, pensive side.

Vivaldi was praised more readily by his contemporaries as a violinist than as a composer, though few went as far as Goldoni, who categorized him as ‘excellent joueur de violon et compositeur médiocre’. Uffenbach’s report of his ending the accompaniment to an operatic aria with ‘a fantasy [i.e. cadenza, or ‘capriccio’] which really terrified me, for such has not been nor can ever be played; he came with his fingers within a mere grass-stalk’s breadth of the bridge, so that the bow had no room – and this on all four strings with imitations and at incredible speed’ vividly captures his predilection for extremely high positions, cadenza-like passages, and multiple stopping. Such pyrotechnics undoubtedly hindered his acceptance as a serious composer. Avison found his compositions ‘equally defective in various harmony and true invention’, an opinion found too sweeping by William Hayes, who, attributing the composer’s faults ‘to his having a great command of his instrument, being of a volatile disposition (having too much mercury in his constitution) and to misapplication of good parts and abilities’, nonetheless thought that the 11th concerto in L’estro armonico (rv565) gave evidence of his ‘capacity in solid composition’. Hawkins admitted the ‘peculiar force and energy’ of his concertos, though he found them ‘wild and irregular’ and disparaged their part-writing.

Quantz had turned against Vivaldi by the time his Anweisung appeared in 1752, reproaching him for too much routine composing and for falling under the bad influence of opera. Further, many of Quantz’s criticisms directed towards particular features of the contemporary Italian style, such as its fondness for simple, functional bass parts thematically unrelated to the upper parts, apply a fortiori to Vivaldi, who helped popularize them. C.P.E. Bach taxed ‘a certain master in Italy’ (obviously Vivaldi) with initiating the custom of writing the bass in a high register and assigning it to violins, a usage already deplored by Benedetto Marcello in his satire Il teatro alla moda (1720), which targets Vivaldi in particular, despite the fact that this scoring technique existed prior to Vivaldi’s earliest known usage. Vivaldi’s kindest German critic was the italophile Johann Mattheson, who commended him for his observation of the distinction between apt vocal and instrumental writing (the first avoiding the leaps of the second). Ironically, Tartini was reported by De Brosses to have instanced Vivaldi as one of those men gifted in instrumental composition who met with failure when they essayed opera – perhaps a case of sour grapes, for Goldoni wrote that most of Vivaldi’s operas were successful.

A few of Vivaldi’s instrumental works remained on concert programmes in France, most notably The Four Seasons (especially Spring), or extracted in violin tutors for several decades following his demise. However, by the latter part of the 18th century Vivaldi fell into virtual oblivion, except among a few music historians and lexicographers – to be rescued, like so many of his contemporaries, via Bach scholarship. The influence of Vivaldi on Bach had been acknowledged by Forkel; now Rühlmann and Waldersee unearthed the Vivaldi originals of the Bach transcriptions and made their comparisons – always, at that time, to the Italian’s disadvantage. His unequivocal importance to the history of the concerto was first demonstrated by Arnold Schering in 1905. The steady growth of interest in him received a tremendous spur from the discovery by Alberto Gentili in the 1920s of Vivaldi’s personal archive of scores (the great variety of genres, both sacred and secular, and the preponderance of autograph scores make it impossible that the collection originally belonged to the Pietà, as some have suggested): the Foà and Giordano collections, now in the Biblioteca Nazionale, Turin. These were once, before their arbitrary division as a legacy into two collections, the property of the Venetian bibliophile Jacopo Soranzo, and later of Gluck’s patron Count Giacomo Durazzo. The seal was set on Vivaldi’s rehabilitation by the inauguration in 1947 of a collected edition of his instrumental works published by Ricordi in association with the Istituto Italiano Antonio Vivaldi (IIAV) and the appearance of Marc Pincherle’s famous study in the following year. The revival has continued with numerous recording projects, a handful of conferences, journals, and Vivaldi societies, a critical edition (ongoing), and – in recent years – growing interest in staging Vivaldi’s operas. Many of these enterprises have been instigated or assisted by the IIAV. Meanwhile, Vivaldi’s music and biography have become a subject of broader cultural and media attention, albeit with the result that erroneous information has at times clouded accurate public perception of his life and works.

The cataloguing of Vivaldi’s large and diverse output has proved a difficult task, especially as works having thematic incipits in common often prove on closer examination to be different (conversely, works with different incipits often share secondary material). With the rapid progress of Vivaldi research in recent years the two principal older catalogues, by Pincherle and Mario Rinaldi, have largely fallen into disuse, while the catalogue by Antonio Fanna, though still used, functions mainly as a finding list for the instrumental works published by Ricordi. The most recent and currently preferred catalogue by Peter Ryom, which exists in several versions published from 1973 onwards, is the only one that can claim to be complete. Although much more rationally organized than its predecessors, it has begun to show signs of its age, not least in the mass of recently discovered works untidily occupying the numbers from rv754 onwards and the confusing transfers of works (in both directions) between the main series (rv) and the one containing works of disputed or uncertain authorship (rv Anh). Following the first ‘full’ edition in 2007, updates have been provided by the new curator, Federico Maria Sardelli, in issues of Studi vivaldiani, and a second edition of the full catalogue is forthcoming.

5. Instrumental music.

No brief description can do justice to the variety of form, scoring, and imaginative conception in Vivaldi’s 500-odd concertos. If he did not invent ritornello form – the form in which varied restatements in different keys of a ritornello (refrain), usually scored for the full ensemble, alternate with modulating episodes of free thematic character, where a soloist predominates – he was at least the first composer to use it regularly in the fast movements of concertos, so providing his contemporaries with the models they were seeking. The same is true of the standard three-movement plan. Several occasional features of Vivaldi concertos were taken further and made normative by his successors: the northern Italians, including Tartini and Locatelli, copied his reference to the ritornello opening at the start of the first solo episode, the infiltration of solo writing into the ritornello, and the provision of a cadenza; the Germans, notably Bach, developed his techniques of thematic integration – the reprise of the first solo idea in the final episode and the use of ritornello fragments to accompany the soloist. Very often, Vivaldi has a double statement of the ritornello in the tonic at the end of the movement (which facilitates the matching of the openings of the first and last episodes) or a single statement of the ritornello interrupted by one or more solo excursions generally either reminiscent of earlier solo material or in the nature of a cadenza. G.M. Alberti and Telemann were among the composers who often copied this feature. One Vivaldian idiosyncrasy – the tendency to make ritornello restatements progressively shorter and less complete, while the length of episodes increases – was not taken over by his imitators, who preferred more symmetrical proportions. This peculiarity was accentuated by Vivaldi’s impulsive way of composing: certain ideas in the opening ritornello, it seems, captured his imagination and recur almost automatically, while others, equally fertile in possibilities, are passed over, allowing the ritornello to become whittled down by a process akin to natural selection. It also happens that spontaneous modifications devoid of specific purpose are made to the ritornello in the act of writing it out again, as if the composer disdained to refresh his memory by consulting earlier pages. A simplified version of ritornello form is often used in slow movements, though binary form, variation form (sometimes employing a ground bass), and through-composed form also occur. Binary and variation form are occasionally found in finales.

Roughly 350 concertos are for one solo instrument and strings, over 230 of them for violin. Other solo instruments are (in descending order of frequency): bassoon, cello, oboe, flute, viola d’amore, a violin adapted to sound like a trumpet marine, recorder (including the so-called ‘flautino’), and mandolin. There are 40-odd double concertos, mostly for two similar instruments but including such rare combinations as viola d’amore and lute (rv540). Multiple concertos, in which three or more soloists participate, number over 30 and introduce, among other instruments, clarinets (making one of their earliest orchestral appearances), chalumeaux, theorbos, horns, and timpani. A very important group of works is constituted by nearly 60 ripieno concertos (or string concertos without soloist), stylistically often very close to operatic sinfonias, with which they can be virtually interchangeable; some of them demonstrate an impressive sense of thematic economy and a flair for fugal writing that should give pause to those who consider Vivaldi an arch-instigator of the ‘flight from counterpoint’. Over 20 concertos are for a small group of solo instruments without string ripieno; the tutti is formed by the united soloists, as in Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto no.3. Finally, there are a small number of works for double string orchestra with soloists, continuing an old Venetian and Italian tradition.

Many of the concertos received descriptive titles of various kinds. Some refer to the original performer or performers (e.g. Il Carbonelli rv366), while others recall the particular feast on which the work was performed (as in the concertos ‘per la Solennità di S Lorenzo’). Some allude to an unusual technical feature; in L’ottavina (rv763), for instance, all the solos are directed to be played an octave higher than written. Other titles (e.g. L’inquietudine rv234) characterize the pervading mood of the work. Lastly, some programmatic or onomatopoeic concertos have appropriate titles (e.g. Il Gardellino rv90, 428; La tempesta di mare rv98, 433, 570). In these, the elements in the ‘programme’ that remain constant (e.g. the huntsmen in the finale of the ‘Autumn’ concerto from the ‘Four Seasons’) are, quite logically, incorporated in the ritornello, while transitory events (e.g. the death of their quarry) are depicted in individual episodes. The slow movements are mostly static tableaux in which instrumentation is sometimes skilfully used to differentiate parts of the scene: in the central movement of the ‘Spring’ concerto, for instance, we hear simultaneously a sleeping shepherd (solo violin), a rippling brook (orchestral violins), and a vigilant sheepdog (viola).

Vivaldi was a deft and enterprising orchestrator. In general, the number of real parts is reduced and the texture lightened in solo passages, but the ways in which that is achieved are so varied as to defy enumeration. Single-line accompaniments on continuo or ripieno violins are the most common. He employed many special colouristic effects, such as muting and pizzicato, and paid exceptional attention for his time to the nuances of string articulation and bowing. The well-known passage in op.3 no.10 (rv580) where each of the four solo violins arpeggiates in a different manner is a representative instance. In particular, Vivaldi was fond of syncopated bowing in which the change of bow occurs on a note off the beat. Occasionally he seems to call for a true crescendo or diminuendo, anticipating early Classical style.

His approximately 90 sonatas are by comparison conservative in form and style, reflecting the special role of the genre in Italy as the repository of traditional technique. The trio sonatas of opp.1 and 5 are firmly in the chamber style, paying due homage to Corelli, while the solo sonatas, variously for violin, cello, and wind instruments, are mostly in a composite church–chamber style where da camera elements have the upper hand, as shown by the supremacy of binary form, even in slow movements. The most interesting sonatas are perhaps a group of four for two violins performable without bass support (rv68, 70, 71, 77), which probably antedate Leclair’s op.3 duets.

In his instrumental music, as in his operas, Vivaldi was an uninhibited self-borrower. The extent to which material, including whole movements, was not merely re-used in works of the same genre but even transferred from one genre to another is remarkable. The slow movement of a solo sonata (rv12) can reappear in a solo concerto (rv582). A binary sonata finale (rv755) can be converted into ritornello form and used in a concerto (rv229). More subtly, the opening of the Allemanda finale of rv3 supplies the material of the episodes in the first movement of rv101 and its later version rv437. In those cases the sequence of borrowing is fairly clear, but in many others guesses are hazardous on present evidence. Vivaldi was also prone to modify existing works when they were required for new purposes; it is unlikely that he would ever have considered any version definitive. In recent years it has become evident that many of Vivaldi’s movements in the stile antico are borrowed, usually with only slight adaptation, from older composers, including Giovanni Maria Ruggieri and Antonio Lotti.

6. Vocal music.

Vivaldi’s sacred music, in his day less well known outside Italy and central Europe, was subject to the operatic influences of his age, although many individual movements remain close to the stile osservato. His numerous solo motets, well described by Denis Arnold as ‘concertos for voice’, have frankly exhibitionistic vocal parts. Vivaldi left eight ‘introductory’ motets (introduzioni) designed to preface a large-scale setting of a liturgical text (Gloria, Dixit Dominus, Miserere). Few examples of this subgenre are known from other composers. It is noteworthy how frequently the principal melodic interest in choral movements is allotted to the violins, leaving the choir to declaim homophonically in the background (as in the outer movements of the Credo rv591), thus anticipating the symphonic mass of Haydn’s generation. Alongside operatic influence, that of the concerto is rarely absent. An extreme case is the Beatus vir rv598, conceived as a vast span of 420 bars in ritornello form; here the vocal soloists are heard in the episodes and the choir fulfils tutti and solo functions by turns. In his church music Vivaldi succeeded admirably in conveying the general sense of the text, but only gradually mastered the art of word-setting; in his post-1730 vocal music (both sacred and secular), there is a much stronger sense that the words shaped the ideas as they formed in his musical imagination, avoiding the unnecessary word-repetition and inversion of words and phrases found in his earlier works. It is the factor of a strong musical personality rather than artistic refinement that has brought deserved popularity in recent times to earlier works such as the Gloria rv589, the Magnificat rv610 and 611, and the oratorio Juditha triumphans.

His cantatas and serenatas are written in the style often misleadingly termed ‘Neapolitan’ after Alessandro Scarlatti. Their backbone is a series of two or more da capo arias, with which recitatives alternate. Over three-quarters of his cantatas are for solo voice (soprano or alto) and continuo alone, the favoured combination of the time. They constitute the least innovatory portion of his output, but by no means the least expertly written. There is a hint in one cantata (Nel partir da te mio caro rv661) that Vivaldi sometimes wrote the poetic text himself, for whereas three rejected openings of one recitative there have one text, the successful fourth version has a similar but not identical text. (Vivaldi is also suspected of having penned the sonetti dimostrativi explicating the ‘Four Seasons’.) The serenatas are more extended works, intermediate in style between cantata and opera and commissioned to celebrate an event or eulogize some person. Lacking the length and expense of the operas, while furnishing more interesting sonorities than the cantatas, they fully deserve revival.

The scores of 22 operas, some lacking one or more acts, have survived, along with fragments of numerous others. These include his first publicly acknowledged opera (Ottone in villa) and one of his last (Rosmira). Recent research has shown the widespread dissemination, in Vivaldi’s day, of a few operas (usually with many alterations) and in particular a handful of individual arias. Several arias were also reshaped as instrumental works (and perhaps, occasionally, vice versa), further suggesting their appeal to Vivaldi’s audiences. Viewed dramatically, the operas explore many of the conventions familiar for Italian opera of the period, drawn from opera seria and pastoral dramatic traditions (with evidence of many subgenres within each), and with a gradual trend towards heroic-tragic plots in Vivaldi’s later decades. Within these, each drama includes a wide range of expression that is often magnified through Vivaldi’s music, which is as vital and imaginative as any he wrote. Obbligato instruments are introduced from time to time: for example, Armida calls for a solo violin, Giustino a psaltery, and Orlando furioso (rv728) a flute. It is interesting that some of the later scores include a few arias by Leo, Hasse, Handel, Pergolesi, and other composers of the moment. Vivaldi may have wished to lend a veneer of fashion to the operas, no longer confident of his ability to satisfy public taste; or perhaps he borrowed simply for convenience or at a singer’s behest. Throughout his career, Vivaldi was also in the regular habit of re-using (with or without emendations to text and/or music) his own arias, perhaps on account of their previous success, to satisfy the desires of a particular singer, or because those arias had not yet been heard in a particular city. In many cases, arias preserved individually cannot be definitely linked to a specific production, especially since Vivaldi (and others) appears to have frequently altered operas during their performance runs and at each subsequent revival.

7. Points of style.

Vivaldi’s musical language is so distinctive that it is worth mentioning a few of its peculiarities. His melody shows a penchant for Lombardic rhythms (which, according to Quantz, he was the first to introduce) and for syncopation – betraying, perhaps, Venice’s connections with Dalmatia and the Slavonic hinterland. His treatment of the variable sixth and seventh degrees of the minor scale was amazingly flexible, admitting the augmented 2nd as a melodic interval even in an ascending line. Compound intervals, including the octave, could assume an expressive melodic value hitherto barely exploited. He transported ideas from the major into the minor mode (and vice versa) with almost Schubertian freedom. He formed melodies from mere cadential fragments (a phenomenon well described by Kolneder as ‘Kadenzmelodik’). His harmony abounds in 7th chords, and he used the higher dominant discords (9th, 11th, 13th) over pedals with near recklessness. He can modulate extremely abruptly, often through a VII–I rather than V–I progression. Juxtapositions of very slow and very fast harmonic rhythms are frequent. His phrasing often includes irregular groups (e.g. of one and a half bars’ length). His two violins frequently toss a pair of contrapuntally contrasted motifs back and forth over several bars, either at one pitch (producing a quasi-canonic effect) or at different pitches in a sequential pattern; sequence, incidentally, was a device whose attractiveness to Vivaldi could be dangerous in his more facile moments. Ostinato phrases in one part which contradict the changing harmonies of the other parts are typical. In matters of texture and orchestration, he often presaged techniques of the later 18th-century symphonists, deploying instrumental resources (even when limited to strings and continuo) in a variety of shifting combinations to create an array of sonorities that underscore important sectional and gestural contrasts. Fugal writing, while far less common than in the music of Handel and Bach, plays an important role in several works, often in the guise of fugal expositions followed by freer material in episodes for solo instruments.

It is rare that such an individualist attracts many followers. Yet during the period 1710–30 Vivaldi’s influence on the concerto was so strong that some established composers older than him like Dall’Abaco and Albinoni felt obliged to modify their style in mid-career. In most of Italy, and in France after about 1725, the Vivaldian model was enthusiastically adopted. Only in conservative Rome and certain other parts of Europe (notably England) where the Corellian style had taken firm root was its hegemony resisted, and even then a Vivaldian spirit informs many concertos whose form is more Corellian than Vivaldian. Because the influence of the concerto permeated all forms of composition Vivaldi can legitimately be regarded as a most important precursor of G.B. Sammartini and the Bach sons in the evolution of the Classical symphony. Equally, he can be seen as a harbinger of musical Romanticism, not just on account of the pictorialism of certain programmatic concertos, but in more general terms because of the higher value he placed on expression than on perfection of detail.

Works

Catalogues

P. Ryom: Table de concordances des oeuvres (RV) (Copenhagen, 1973); Verzeichnis der Werke Antonio Vivaldis (RV): kleine Ausgabe (Leipzig, 1974, 2/1979); Répertoire des oeuvres d’Antonio Vivaldi: les compositions instrumentales (Copenhagen, 1986); Antonio Vivaldi: Thematisch-systematisches Verzeichnis seiner Werke (RV) (Weisbaden, 2007); 2nd ed., rev. F.M. Sardelli (Wiesbaden, 2017) [RV]

A. Fanna: Opere strumentali di Antonio Vivaldi (1678–1741): catalogo numerico-tematico secondo la catalogazione Fanna (Milan, 1986) [F]

Editions

Le opere di Antonio Vivaldi, ed. G.F. Malipiero and others (Milan, 1947–72) [M no.]

Nuova edizione critica delle opere di Antonio Vivaldi, ed. Istituto Italiano Antonio Vivaldi (Milan, 1982–) [CE (unnumbered)]

Opere incomplete, ed. Istituto Italiano Antonio Vivaldi (Florence, 2001–9) [Op. Inc. (unnumbered)]

Operas

FP

Florence, Teatro della Pergola

MA

Mantua, Teatro arciducale

PS

Prague, Teatro Sporck

VA

Venice, Teatro Sant’Angelo

VC

Venice, Teatro San Cassiano

VM

Venice, Teatro San Moisé

VeF

Verona, Teatro filarmonico

ViK

Vienna, Theater am Kärntnertor

drammi per musica, in three acts, unless otherwise stated; includes pasticcios arranged by Vivaldi

dates of first performance given where known (* = date of libretto’s dedication; ** = date of censors’ approval); all dates given in modern calendar equivalent

it is not always certain if the re-appearance (literal or altered) of an aria text in a revival or subsequent opera means that the same music was used without alterations – for these cases, the remark “lost?” is used if the surviving musical sources are not directly linked to the production in question

principal sources generally listed only for first staged version of each work

View large

Title

rv

Librettist

First performance

Principal music sources and revivals

Creso tolto a le fiamme

Anh.138

A. Aureli

VA, 5 Dec 1705

music lost; Vivaldi claimed, in legal documents (I-Vas), to have written or adapted most of this opera’s music at the request of G. Polani

Ottone in villa

729a

D. Lalli, after F.M. Piccioli: Messalina

Vicenza, Garzerie, May 1713

Tn; facs. in DMV, xii, 1983; revived Treviso, Dolfin, Oct 1729 [= rv729b]

Orlando finto pazzo

727

G. Braccioli

VA, 10 Nov 1714*

Tn (lacking sinfonia)

Orlando Furioso

819

G. Braccioli, after L. Ariosto

VA, 1 Dec 1714*

Tn (Acts 1 and 2 only; many items at present preserved incompletely); revision of G.A. Ristori’s Orlando furioso (VA, 9 Nov 1713), which itself may have acquired music by Vivaldi during its initial run; the music of the 1714 version is largely by Vivaldi [formerly rv Anh.84]; music and text re-used in numerous pasticcios and other productions 1720–46 (see also rv728)

Nerone fatto Cesare

724

M. Noris with anon. alterations

VA, 12 Feb 1715**

music lost?; pasticcio arr. by Vivaldi; 12 arias attributed to Vivaldi in libretto; others anon. or attributed to G.A. Perti, F.A. Pistocchi, A. Pollarolo, G.M. Orlandini, A. Carli, and F. Gasparini; possible revival (Brescia, Teatro accademico, carn. 1716) [= rv Anh.127.15]

La costanza trionfante degl’amori e degl’odii

706a

A. Marchi

VM, 18 Jan 1716*

Arias in D-Bds, DK-Kk, F-Pn, GB-BER; revived as Artabano, re dei Parti (VM, 5 Jan 1718**) [= rv706b; formerly rv701], aria SK-Kk; as Artabano, re dei Parti (Vicenza, Garzerie, carn. 1719) [= rv706c]; as Die über Hass und Liebe siegende Beständigkeit, oder Tigranes, König von Armenien (Hamburg, Gänsemarkt, May 1719 and later) [= rv Anh.57]; as L’Artabano (MA, carn. 1725) with changes [= rv706d]; as La tirannia gastigata (PS, carn. 1726) [= rv Anh.55], pasticcio by A. Denzio (after F. Silvani: La fortezza al cimento) with recitatives and ?addl arias by G.A. Guerra; as Doriclea (PS, carn. 1732) [= rv706e, formerly rv708], adapted by A. Denzio?; arias also used in L’odio vinto dalla costanza (VA, carn. 1731) [= rv Anh.51], libretto rev. B. Vitturi, music rev. A. Galeazzi

Arsilda, regina di Ponto

700

D. Lalli

VA, 27/8 Oct 1716; possibly planned (but not completed?) for earlier performance (carn. 1716?)

I-Tn (1 autograph working score, 1 copy); sinfonia re-used in rv736; revived VA, Jan 1717

L’Incoronazione di Dario

719

A. Morselli, with anon. alterations

VA, 23 Jan 1717

Tn

Tieteberga

737

A.M. Lucchini

VM, 16 Oct 1717

Revised during season (incl. arias by other composers); arias D-Bds, F-Pc, Pn, I-Tn, S-L

Armida al campo d’Egitto

699a

G. Palazzi, after T. Tasso

VM, 14 Feb 1718

I-Tn, inc. (Act 2 lacking – 1 aria survives in DK-Kb); Turin source contains rev. for 1738 revival; sinfonia re-used for rv710; revived (MA, 24 April 1718) [= rv699b]; as Gl’inganni per vendetta (Vicenza, Grazie, 12 May 1720**) [= rv699c; formerly rv720]; with addns by A. Monteventi (Ravenna, Industria, carn. 1726) [= rv deest]; with anon. rev. (Venice, S Margherita, carn. 1731) [= rv Anh.90]; rev. by Vivaldi with addl arias by other composers (VA, 12 Feb. 1738) [= rv699d]

Scanderbeg

732a

A. Salvi

FP, 22 June 1718

4 arias, 2 recits I-Tn; revived (Siena, Teatro degli Accademici Intronati, 1718) [= rv732b]

Il Teuzzone

736

A. Zeno, with anon. alterations

MA, 26 Dec 1718

D-Bsb (copy of final version; lacking sinfonia), I-Tn (working score, partly autograph; sinfonia presently preserved separately in Tn); ?pasticcio; includes arias by G.M. Orlandini and ?others; sinfonia re-used from rv700; CE (forthcoming)

Tito Manlio

738

M. Noris, with anon. alterations

MA, Jan 1719

Tn (1 autograph copy of final version, headed ‘musica del Vivaldi fatta in 5 giorni’; 1 working copy with autograph emendations; both lacking sinfonia); collection of 8 arias Tn; ed. in CE

Tito Manlio

778

M. Noris

Rome, Pace, 8 Jan 1720

Collaborative opera; Act 1 by G. Boni, Act 2 by G. Giorgi, Act 3 by Vivaldi; arias in D-MÜS, WD (incl, 1 chorus), and F-Pc; a few of Vivaldi’s arias correspond with rv738; formerly rv Anh.56

La Candace, o siano Li veri amici

704

?, rev. D. Lalli, after P. Corneille: Héraclius, empereur d’Orient, with further anon. alterations

MA, planned for Jan 1720 (possibly never staged)

11 arias and 1 quartet I-Tn; a few Vivaldi numbers possibly incl. in revival (?pasticcio) at ViK (July 1738) [= rv Anh.127.5]

La verità in cimento

739

G. Palazzi and D. Lalli

VA, 26 Oct 1720

Tn

Filippo, re di Macedonia

715

D. Lalli

VA, 27 Dec 1720

Collaborative opera; Acts 1 and 2 by G. Boniventi, Act 3 by Vivaldi; aria (III:3), shared with rv663, F-Pn (attributed to G.M. Orlandini); other music lost?

La Silvia

734

E. Bissari

Milan, Regio Ducale, 26 Aug 1721

several arias (and some recits.) I-Tn and elsewhere (incl. other Vivaldi operas); some aria texts (and music?) re-used in revival (pasticcio) at VM (autumn, 1730) [= rv Anh.127a.37] (music attrib. to B. Cordans)

Ercole su ’l Termodonte

710

G.F. Bussani, with anon. alterations

Rome, Capranica, (?23) Jan 1723

23 arias, 1 duet D-MÜs, 6 arias, sinfonia F-Pc; arias Pn, B-Bc, and I-Rc; sinfonia re-used from rv699; many arias re-used (and adapted?) from earlier Vivaldi operas

La virtù trionfante dell’amore e dell’odio, overo Il Tigrane

740

P.A. Bernardoni, with anon. alterations

Rome, Capranica, ?Jan 1724 [1st carnival opera]

Collaborative opera; Act 1 by B. Micheli, Act 2 by Vivaldi, Act 3 by N. Romaldi; Vivaldi’s portion preserved in Tn

Il Giustino

717

P. Pariati, after N. Beregan, with further alterations by ?A.M. Lucchini

Rome, Capranica, ?Jan/Feb 1724 [2nd carnival opera]

Tn; ed. R. Strohm (Milan, 1991)

L’inganno trionfante in amore

721

?G.M. Ruggieri, after M. Noris Laodicea e Berenice

VA, shortly before 15 Dec 1725

?pasticcio arr. by Vivaldi; incl. at least 16 numbers (some new?) by Vivaldi; 5 arias A-LA, B-Bc, Earenberg

Cunegonda

707

A. Piovene: La principessa fedele, with anon. alterations

VA, 29 Jan 1726

music lost; passed by censors 22 Jan 1726; pasticcio arr. Vivaldi; incl. arias by Albinoni, Porpora, Vinci, and others; presence of music by Vivaldi uncertain

La fede tradita e vendicata

712

F. Silvani, with anon. alterations

VA, 16 Feb 1726

passed by censors 10 Jan 1726; aria D-Dl

La Dorilla (in Tempe)

709a

A.M. Lucchini

VA, 9 Nov 1726

melodramma eroico-pastorale; I-Tn (most material for rv709a obscured by later revisions for rv709c); sinfonia partly re-used in rv711d; sinfonia (3rd movt) and opening chorus adapt material from rv269, 1st movt; revived (PS, spring 1732), adapted by A. Denzio? (incl. music by Hasse?) [= rv709b]; as pasticcio arr. by Vivaldi (VA, ?2 Feb 1734) incl. arias by Sarri, Hasse, Giacomelli, and Leo [= rv709c; score of this version formerly designated rv709d and identified with unknown production]

Ipermestra

722

A. Salvi, with anon. alterations

FP, 25 Jan 1727

3 arias US-BEm

Farnace

711a

A.M. Lucchini

VA, 10 Feb 1727

Passed by censors 6 Feb 1727; revived in aut. 1727 with several new arias by Vivaldi [= rv711b]; revived (PS, spring 1730) [= rv711c], Vivaldi’s involvement uncertain; rev. (Pavia, Omodeo, 4 May 1731*), score I-Tn (partly autograph) [= rv711d], sinfonia (movts 1 and 2) re-used from rv709; revived (MA, 26 Jan 1732*) [= rv711e], presumably rev. by Vivaldi; revived (Treviso, Dolfin, carnival 1737) [= rv711f] probably without Vivaldi’s direct involvement; planned revival with substantial revision by Vivaldi (Ferrara, carnival 1739) cancelled, score Tn (autograph, dated 1738, Acts 1 and 2) [= rv711g]

Siroe, re di Persia

735a

P. Metastasio

Reggio nell’Emilia, Pubblico, 29 April 1727* (Ascension)

music lost?; revived (Ancona, Fenice, sum. 1738), with arias from many of Vivaldi’s other operas [= rv735b]; revived (Ferrara, Bonacossi, 1st op in carn. 1739), probably a pasticcio arr. by Vivaldi [= rv735c]

Orlando Furioso

728

G. Braccioli, after L. Ariosto

VA, 5 Nov 1727**

Tn (working score, mainly autograph, lacking sinfonia); lib similar to, but music largely different from, 1714 version

Rosilena ed Oronta

730

G. Palazzi

VA, 15 Jan 1728**

music lost

L’Atenaide

702a

A. Zeno

FP, 29 Dec 1728

Tn (lacking sinfonia), 6 arias D-Dl; differences between the 1728 Florentine libretto and the surviving score [intended for subsequent revival?, designated as rv702b]

Argippo

697a

D. Lalli, with anon. alterations

ViK, 1730 (season unidentified)

Alternate version (PS, aut. 1730) [= rv697b]; a few arias from both versions possibly in collection now held in Rtt (= ?pasticcio by A. Denzio?; production unknown, possibly Regensburg, 1733) [= rv Anh.137]

La fida ninfa

714

S. Maffei

VeF, 6 Jan 1732

I-Tn (lacking sinfonia); 8 arias, 1 trio D-Dl; written for opening of new theatre; ed. in CE; probably revived, with anon. alterations, as Il giorno felice (ViK, 5 Feb 1737) to celebrate birth of Maria Anna, daughter of Duke Francis Stephen of Lorraine and Archduchess Maria Theresa [= rv Anh.92.16; formerly rv777]

Semiramide

733

F. Silvani

MA, 26 Dec 1731*

6 arias Dl

Motezuma

723

A. Giusti

VA, 14 Nov 1733

Bsa (lacking sinfonia, opening of Act 1, and most of Act 3); publ. in facs. (Berlin, Sing-Akademie zu Berlin, 2005)

L’Olimpiade

725

P. Metastasio, adapted by B. Vitturi

VA, 17 Feb 1734

I-Tn

Il Bajazet [libretto: Il Tamerlano]

703

A. Piovene, with anon. alterations

VeF, carn. 1735

tragedia per musica; Tn (some arias missing); pasticcio arr. Vivaldi (with some new music) incl. arias by Hasse, Giacomelli, Porpora, and R. Broschi; CE (forthcoming)

L’Adelaide

695

A. Salvi, with anon. alterations

VeF, carn. 1735

music lost?

La Griselda

718

A. Zeno, rev. C. Goldoni, after G. Boccaccio: Il decamerone

Venice, S Samuele, 18 May 1735

Tn (facs. in IOB, xxxv, 1978); ed. R. Fasano (Palermo, 1985) and CE

Ginevra, principessa di Scozia

716

A. Salvi, rev. D. Marchi, after L. Ariosto: Orlando furioso

FP, 17 Jan 1736

music lost?

Catone in Utica

705

P. Metastasio, with anon. alterations

VeF, April 1737

Tn (Acts 2 and 3 only)

L’oracolo in Messenia

726

A. Zeno: Merope

VA, 30 Dec 1737

passed censors ?27 Dec 1737; posthumous rev. (Vienna, ?Burgtheater, ?20 Jan 1742), for opening of new court theatre?

Rosmira [Rosmira fedele]

731

S. Stampiglia: Partenope, with anon. alterations

VA, 27 Jan 1738

Tn (lacking 4 arias); pasticcio arr. Vivaldi (with some new music), incl. arias by A. Mazzoni, G.A. Paganelli, Handel, Pergolesi, Hasse, A. Pampini, Vinci, and others; sinfonia by G. Micheli

Feraspe

713

F. Silvani: L’innocenza giustificata, rev. B. Vitturi

VA, 7 Nov 1739

music lost

Uncertain or spurious

Alvilda, regina de’Goti

Anh.88

Adapted from A. Zeno: L’amor generoso and G.C. Corradi: L’amazzone corsara

PS, spr. 1731

probably pasticcio (?by A. Denzio) using numerous arias from Vivaldi’s operas [formerly rv696]

Aristide

Anh.89

? C. Goldoni [‘Calindo Grolo’]

Venice, S Samuele, aut. 1735 (no documentation of performance beyond claim in libretto)

drama eroi-comico per musica, 1 act; music attrib. to ‘Lotavio Vandini’; ? not by Vivaldi (formerly rv698)

Additional works

Arr. of J.A. Hasse: Demetrio (Ferrara, Bonacossi, carn. 1737), with contribution of – at least – 7 arias, some preserved in other operas [= rv Anh.44]; Alessandro nell’Indie (Ferrara, Bonacossi, carn. 1737) , with contribution of – at least – 4 arias, some preserved in other operas [= rv Anh.40]

Contributions to: La ninfa infelice e fortunata (Treviso, Dolfin, 1723), pasticcio [= rv Anh.151]; G. Giacomelli, Cesare in Egitto (FP, 1736), as adapted by G.M. Orlandini [= rv Anh.127.33]; Li veri amici (Florence, Cocomero, 1735) [= rv Anh.127.34]

Arias A-Wgm, Wn; B-Bc; CH-Gc; D-Bsb, BNms, Dl, Hs, LEm, Mbs, MÜs, MÜu, ROu, SHs, SWl; DK-Kk; F-Pc, Pn; GB-Cfm, Lbl, Mp; I-Mc, Nc, Tn, Vc; S-L, SK; US-BEm; see rv749 and rv Anh.59

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See also the operas and pasticcios that may have included music by Vivaldi listed under the numbers rv Anh.127 and rv Anh.127a.

Serenatas

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Title/incipit

rv

Text author

Performance

Forces

Sources, edition, remarks

La Gloria [e] Himeneo [=?title or character list]

(Dall’eccelsa mia reggia)

687

?

Venice, French Embassy, 12 Sept 1725

S, A, str, bc

I-Tn (lacking title and sinfonia?); facs. in DMV, xv, 1995 (with rv693); libretto lost; ed. in CE as “La Gloria e Imeneo” (2016); for celebration of marriage of Louis XV and Maria Leszczyńska

Le gare del dovere

688

?

Rovigo, July 1708

5vv, ?

music lost; text ed. R. Kintzel (SV 11, 2011); for Francesco Querini’s retirement as governor (podestà) of Rovigo

Le gare della Giustizia e della Pace

689

G.B. Catena

Venice [early 1720s?]

?

music and text lost; for name-day of Charles VI

Serenata a 3 (Mio cor, povero cor)

690

?

[?Rome, between 1716 and 1718?]

S, S, T, 2 ob, bn, 2 hn, str, bc

I-Tn; inscribed ‘pour Monsieur le Mar[quis] du Toureil’; ed. in CE as ‘Serenata a 3’ (2010); libretto lost; text includes references to trial of abbé Jean de Tourreil

Il Mopso

691

Egidio Nonnanuci [G. Cendoni]

Venice, La Pietà, [c. 1716 or ?1737–8]

5vv, ?

music and text lost; described as an ‘egloga pescatoria’; performed for Ferdinand Maria, Elector of Bavaria

Serenata a quattro voci (Queste, Eurilla gentil)

692

V. Vettori

Mantua, Palazzo della Favorita, 31 July 1726

4vv, ?

music lost; text ed. R. Kintzel (SV 10, 2010); for birthday celebration of Prince Philip of Hesse-DarmstadteHess

La Senna festeggiante

693

D. Lalli

[?Venice, ?French Embassy, ?1726]

S, A, [T], B, 2 fl, 2 ob, str, bc

I-Tn (inc., probably lacking a bass aria and portions of recitative near end); facs. in DMV, xv, 1995 (with rv687); libretto lost; optional tenor pt in final chorus; winds may be multiplied; in honour of Louis XV; CE (forthcoming)

L’unione della Pace e di Marte

694

A. Grossatesta

Venice, French Embassy, 19 Sept 1727

3vv, ?

music lost; text ed. R. Kintzel (SV 9, 2009); for celebration of birth of daughters of Louis XV and Maria Leszczyńska

Additional works

Andromeda liberata

Anh.117

V. Cassani

?Venice, 18 Sept 1726

5vv, vn, vc, 2 ob, 2 tpt, [2 hn?], str, bc

I-Vc; facs. in DMV, xvi, 2006; multi-authored work containing one original contribution by Vivaldi (aria ‘Sovente il sole’ rv749.27) for celebration of a visit to Venice by Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni

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Solo cantatas

All published in CE unless otherwise noted

Author of aria texts unknown unless otherwise stated

For additional uncertain, doubtful or spurious cantatas, see rv Anh.60, Anh.61, and Anh.115

Cantatas for soprano and basso continuo

Title/first line

rv

Sources, remarks

All’ombra d’un bel faggio

649

I-Tn

Allor che lo sguardo

650

I-Tn

Amor, hai vinto, hai vinto; ecco il mio seno

651

I-Tn; same text as rv683; opening recitative quotes text from P. Metastasio’s Siroe

Aure, voi più non siete

652

I-Tn

Del suo natio rigore

653

I-Tn

Elvira, anima mia

654

I-Tn

Era la notte quando i suoi splendori

655

I-Tn, D-Dl

Fonti del pianto

656

I-Tn, D-Dl

Geme l’onda che parte dal fonte

657

I-Tn, D-Dl

Il povero mio cor

658

I-Tn

Indarno cerca la tortorella

659

I-Tn

La farfalletta s’aggira al lume

660

I-Tn

Nel partir da te, mio caro

661

I-Tn

Par che tardo oltre il costume

662

I-Tn, D-Dl (with modifications)

Scherza di fronda in fronda

663

D-Dl, I-Tn [bass pt of 1st aria with modifications]; F-Pn [version of first aria attributed (?erroneously) to G.M. Orlandini]; text of 1st aria after D. Lalli’s Filippo, re di Macedonia

Se ben vivono senz’alma

664

I-Tn

Si levi dal pensier

665

I-Tn

Sì, sì, luci adorate

666

I-Tn

Sorge vermiglia in ciel la bella Aurora

667

I-Tn, D-Dl (with modifications)

T’intendo, sì, mio cor

668

I-Tn; aria texts adapted from early version of P. Metastasio’s Amor timido (cantata)

Tra l’erbe i zeffiri

669

I-Tn

Tremori al braccio e lagrime sul ciglio

799

A-Wgm

Usignoletto bello

796

2 copies in D-Dl (1 in E♭, 1 in G = probable original key)

Doubtful or spurious

Prendea con man di latte

Anh.94

formerly rv753; GB-Ob; attribution considered spurious, see Timms, ISV 6 (1985) [not in CE]

Cantatas for soprano, 1 or more instruments, and basso continuo

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Title

rv

Instrumental forces

Sources, remarks

All’ombra di sospetto

678

fl, bc

D-Dl

Che giova il sospirar, povero core

679

str, bc

D-MEIr; text of 1st aria paraphrased from F. Silvani La fede tradita e vendicata

Lungi dal vago volto

680

vn, bc

I-Tn

Perché son molli

681

2 vn, [str], bc

GB-Ob (inc.); source lacks va pt

Vengo a voi, luci adorate

682

str, bc

I-Tn

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Cantatas for alto and basso continuo

Title

rv

Sources, remarks

Alla caccia dell’alme e de’ cori

670

I-Tn

Care selve, amici prati

671

I-Tn

Perfidissimo cor, Iniquo fato!

674

D-Dl

Pianti, sospiri e dimandar mercede

676

D-Dl

Qual per ignoto calle

677

D-Dl

Doubtful or spurious [not in CE]

Filli, di gioia vuoi farmi morir

Anh.147

I-Fc; probably not by Vivaldi; formerly rv672

Ingrata Lidia, ha vinto il tuo rigor

Anh.148

I-Fc; probably not by Vivaldi; formerly rv673

Piango, gemo, sospiro e peno

Anh.149

I-Fc; probably not by Vivaldi; formerly rv675

Cantatas for alto, 1 or more instruments, and basso continuo

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Title

rv

Instrumental forces

Sources, remarks

Amor hai vinto, hai vinto; ecco il mio seno

683

str, bc

2 sources in I-Tn (1 with 2 versions of movt 3); listed in court inventory of Bamberg-Würzburg; same text as rv651; opening recitative quotes text from P. Metastasio’s Siroe

Cessate, omai cessate

684

str, bc

I-Tn

684a

str, bc

I-Tn; inc.; portion of a different (?earlier) first aria and ?recitative

O mie porpore più belle

685

str, bc

I-Tn; (?spring 1719); inscription ‘In Lode di Monsignor da Bagni Vescovo di Mantova’; 2nd vn and va tacet in 3rd movt

Qual in pioggia dorata i dolci rai

686

2 hn, str, bc

I-Tn; inscription ‘In Lode di S. A. S. il Se Prencipe Felippo d’Armistaht Gouerne di Mana etc.’

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Sacred music

Masses, Mass sections

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Title

Key

rv

Scoring

Principal sources

Edition, remarks

Kyrie

g

587

2 choirs (S, A, 4vv, str, bc; S, A, 4vv, str, bc)

I-Tn

M, CE

Gloria

D

588

S, S, A, T, 4vv, tpt, 2 ob, str, bc; (solos for 2 vn, 2 va, 2 vc in Qui sedes)

I-Tn

CE; source presents 1st movt interwoven with last movt of RV639/639a; 3 movts adapted from Gloria by G.M. Ruggieri (rv Anh.23)

Gloria

D

589

S, S, A, 4vv, tpt, ob, vn solo ad lib, str, bc

I-Tn

M, CE; 1 movt adapted from Gloria by G.M. Ruggieri (rv Anh.23)

Credo

e

591

4vv, str, bc

I-Tn

M, CE

Lost, uncertain, doubtful, spurious

Sacrum (mass)

C

Anh.112

S, A, T, B 4vv, 2 tpt, 2 vn, vc, org

PL-Wu

formerly RV586; considered spurious

Gloria

D

590

5vv, tpt, ob, ??

--

lost; mentioned in Kreuzherren catalogue; ?related to rv588 or 589

Credo

G

592

S, A, 4vv, ob (ad lib), str (5-pt), bc

PL-Wu

authenticity disputed; ed. P. Maculewicz (2003)

Credo

G

797

??

--

lost; mentioned in Wrocław (cathedral), Catalogus Musicum; ?related to rv592

For additional doubtful and spurious works, see also rv Anh.20 (Composer ‘X’), Anh.21 (Composer ‘X’), Anh.22 (Composer ‘X’), Anh.22a (Composer ‘X’), Anh.23 (Gloria by G.M. Ruggieri), Anh.24 (Gloria by G.M. Ruggieri), Anh.113 (Messa breve by G.B. Grazioli)

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Psalms, hymns, antiphons, and additional liturgical texts (all items Psalm settings unless otherwise identified)

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Title

Key

rv

Scoring

Principal sources

Edition, remarks

Domine ad adiuvandum me festina

G

593

2 choirs (S, 4vv, 2 ob, str, bc; 4vv, str, bc)

I-Tn

CE

Dixit Dominus

D

594

2 choirs (S, A, T, B, 4vv, 2 tpt, 2 ob, str, bc; S, 4vv, [tpt], str, bc)

I-Tn

M, CE; 7th movt requires 1 tpt in each coro (?same 2 players elsewhere used in Coro 1)

Dixit Dominus

D

595

S, S, A, T, B, 5vv, tpt, 2 ob, str, bc (2 vc soli in 4th movt)

CZ-Pnm

CE; 3 movts arr. from works by other composers

Dixit Dominus

D

807

S, S, A, T, T, 4vv, tpt, 2 ob, str, bc

D-Dl (attrib. to Galuppi)

CE

Confitebor tibi Domine

C

596

A, T, B, 2 ob, str, bc

I-Tn

CE

Confitebor tibi Domine

B♭

789

?

I-Vc

preserved inc. (only A and va pts survive)

Beatus vir

C

597

2 choirs (S, A, T, B, 4vv, 2 ob, str, bc; S, 4vv, str, bc), with multiple organs featured in 6th movt

I-Tn

M, CE; ?variant of a lost setting; see rv795 for a later variant

795

S, A, A, A/T, 4vv, str, bc

D-Dl (attrib. Galuppi), I-Vc (inc.)

CE; ?variant of a lost setting; see rv597 for an earlier variant

Beatus vir

B♭

598

S, S, A, 4vv, str, bc,

I-Tn

M, CE

Laudate pueri Dominum

c

600

S, str, bc (vn solo in 8th movt)

CZ-Pnm, I-Tn

CE

Laudate pueri Dominum

G

601

S, fl, 2 ob, str, bc

D-Dl, I-Tn

M, CE

Laudate pueri Dominum

A

602

S, 4vv, str, bc; S, ob, str, bc

I-Tn

CE

602a

2 choirs (S, 4vv, fl, str, bc; S, 4vv, str, bc)

I-Tn

CE; adapted from rv602 incl. new setting of 6th movt

603

2 choirs (S, 4vv, fl, str, bc; 4vv, str, bc)

I-Tn

adapted from rv602a

In exitu Israel

C

604

4vv, str, bc

I-Tn, I-Vc (inc.)

CE

Credidi propter quod locutus sum

C

605

5vv, str, bc

I-Tn

CE; formerly rv Anh.35b; mostly adapted from rv Anh.35 via rv Anh.35a

Laudate Dominum omnes gentes

d

606

4vv, str, bc

I-Tn

CE

Laetatus sum

C

827

4vv, str, bc

D-Dl (attrib. Galuppi)

CE

Laetatus sum

F

607

4vv, str, bc

I-Tn

CE

Nisi Dominus

g

608

A, va d’amore, str, bc

I-Tn

M, CE; source location contains two sets of pts that transmit slightly different versions

Nisi Dominus

A

803

S, A, A/T, va d’amore, t chalumeau, vn ‘in tromba marina’, vc, org, str, bc

D-Dl (attrib. Galuppi)

CE

Lauda Jerusalem

e

609

2 choirs (SS unis, 4vv, str, bc; SS unis, 4vv, str, bc)

I-Tn

M, CE

Magnificat

(canticle)

g

610

S, S, A, T, 4vv, 2 ob, str, bc

I-Tn

M, CE; adaptation of rv610b

610a

2 choirs (S, T, 4vv, 2 ob, str, bc; S, S, A, 4vv, str, bc)

I-Tn

M, CE; alternative adaptation of rv610b

610b

S, S, A, T, B, 4vv, str, bc

CZ-Pnm (2 sources), CZ-Pak (with 2 tpt added later?)

early version of rv610/610a; ed. H.C. Robbins Landon (1961); second (anon. and inc.) source in CZ-Pnm, discovered after Landon ed., believed to transmit an even earlier version

611

S, A, 4vv, str, bc

I-Tn, I-Vc

M, CE; late (1739) version of rv610/610a with several substituted movts

Deus tuorum militum (hymn)

C

612

A, T, 2 ob, str, bc

I-Tn

CE

Gaude mater Ecclesia (hymn)

B♭

613

S, str, bc

I-Tn

CE

Regina coeli

(antiphon)

[C?]

615

T (?A), 2 tpt [= ?vl in tromba marina], str, bc

I-Tn

Op. Inc., CE; preserved inc. (only last two movts survive)

Salve Regina

(antiphon)

c

616

2 choirs (A, 2 rec, fl, str, bc; str, bc)

I-Tn

M, CE

Salve Regina

(antiphon)

F

617

S, vn, str, bc

CZ-Bm

CE

Salve Regina

(antiphon)

g

618

2 choirs (A, 2 ob, str, bc; str, bc)

I-Tn

CE

Sanctorum meritis (hymn)

C

620

S, str, bc

I-Tn

CE

Stabat Mater (hymn)

f

621

A, str, bc

I-Tn

M, CE; probably composed 1712 for S. Maria della Pace, Brescia

Lost, uncertain, doubtful, spurious

Beatus [vir]

?

599

5vv, ?

--

Kreuzherren catalogue, lost; ? orig. version for single choir of rv597 and 795

Laudate Dominum omnes gentes (offertory)

F

rv Anh.114

S, A, 4vv, 2 hn, 2 vn, bc

PL-Wu

formerly, rv614; considered spurious

Salve Regina

(antiphon)

E♭ or e?

804

A, 2 fl, str, ?org, bc

--

lost; mentioned in Bamberg-Würzburg court inventory

Salve Regina

(antiphon)

?

619

?S, 2 ?rec, ?vc, ?str, bc

--

Kreuzherren catalogue, lost

Te Deum

(Hymn)

?

622

?

--

lost; perf. Venice, 19 Sept 1727

For additional doubtful or spurious works, see rv Anh.25 (Composer ‘X’), Anh.26 (Composer ‘X’), Anh.27, Anh.28 (Composer ‘X’), Anh.29 (Composer ‘X’), Anh.30 (Composer ‘X’), Anh.31 (Composer ‘X’), Anh.32 (Composer ‘X’), Anh.33 (Composer ‘X’), Anh.34 (Composer ‘X’), Anh.35, Anh.35a (attrib. to Galuppi is doubtful; ?adapted by Vivaldi from rv Anh.35), Anh.36 (by G.A. Bernabei), Anh.37, Anh.38 (Composer ‘X’)

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Solo motets

View large

Title

Key

RV

Scoring

Principal sources

Edition, remarks

Canta in prato, ride in monte

A

623

S, str, bc

I-Tn

CE; text adapted for rv636

Carae rosae, respirate

G

624

S, str, bc

GB-Lbl, GB-Lcm

Op. inc., CE; preserved inc. (lacking va ?and 2nd vn pt)

Clarae stellae, scintillate

F

625

A, str, bc

I-Tn

CE

In furore guistissimae irae

c

626

S, str, bc

I-Tn

CE

In turbato mare irato

G

627

S, str, bc

D-Dl

CE

Invicti, bellate

G

628

A, str, bc

I-Tn

Op. inc., CE; preserved inc. (missing two folios)

Longe mala, umbrae, terrores

g

629

S, str, bc

I-Tn

CE; ‘Motetto per ogni tempo’; shares some text and thematic material with rv640

Nulla in mundo pax sincera

E

630

S, str, bc

I-Tn

CE

O qui coeli terraeque serenitas

E♭

631

S, str, bc

I-Tn

CE

Sum in medio tempestatum

F

632

S, str, bc

D-Dl

CE

Vestro principi divino

F

633

A, str, bc

I-Tn

CE

Vos aurae per montes

A

634

S, str, bc

I-Af (multiple sources)

CE; ‘Per la solennità di S Antonio’ in autograph score; some non-autograph sources contain alterations to musical and literary text, including transposition to G (probably not connected to Vivaldi)

Vos invito barbare faces

F

811

A, str, bc

I-Af

CE; ?preserved inc. (?lacking one measure)

Ascende laeta montes

A

635

S, str, bc

I-Tn

CE; ‘Introdutione al Dixit’

Canta in prato

G

636

S, 2 ob, str, bc

I-Tn

CE; ‘Introdutione al Dixit’; text adapted from rv623

Cur sagittas, cur tela, cur faces

B♭

637

A, str, bc

I-Tn

CE; ‘Introdutione al Gloria’

Filiae maestae Jerusalem

c

638

A, str, bc

I-Tn

CE; ‘Introdutione al Miserere’

Jubilate ò amoeni chori

D

639

A, [4vv], tpt, 2 ob, str, bc

I-Tn

CE; ‘Introdutione al Gloria’ [= rv588]; source presents 3rd movt of rv639/639a interwoven with 1st movt of rv588

Jubilate ò amoeni chori

D

639a

S, [4vv], tpt, 2 ob, str, bc

I-Tn

CE; ‘Introdutione al Gloria’ [= rv588]; source presents modified vocal and bc parts for rv639

Longe mala, umbrae, terrores

g

640

A, str, bc

I-Tn

CE; ‘Introdutione al Gloria’; shares some text and musical material with rv629

Non in pratis aut in hortis

F

641

A, str, bc

I-Tn

CE; ‘Introdutione al Miserere’

Ostro picta, armata spina

D

642

S, str, bc

I-Tn

CE; ‘Introdutione al Gloria’

Lost or spurious

Ad corda reclina (Concertus italicus)

F

Anh.59.15

A, str, bc

PL-Wu

formerly rv648; anon. arr. of ‘Vedrai nel volto di quella infelice’ from rv700

Eja voces plausum date / Nato pastor pro me melos (Aria de sanctis)

E♭/ D♭

Anh.59.23

B, str, bc

PL-Wu

formerly rv647; anon. arr. of ‘Benché nasconda la serpe in seno’ from rv728

Ihr Himmel nun (Concertus italicus)

E

Anh.59.19

A, vn, str, bc

PL-Wu

formerly rv646; anon. arr. of ‘Son come farfalletta’ from rv700

Candida Lylia (Cantata de tempore)

B♭

747

A, ?str, bc

--

Kreuzherren catalogue, lost

Aria per la communione

G

748

?

--

Kreuzherren catalogue, lost

For other doubtful and spurious, see rv Anh.59 and Anh.63

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SV = Studi vivaldiani (Florence, 2001–14; Venice, 2015–)

music lost unless otherwise stated

Oratorios

View large

Title/incipit

rv

Text author

Performance

Forces

Sources, edition, remarks

La vittoria navale predetta dal S Pontefice Pio V Ghisilieri

782

?

Vicenza, S Corona, 23 June 1713

4vv, ?

text ed. R. Kintzel (SV 8, 2008) for anniversary of canonization of Pius V

Moyses Deus Pharaonis

643

G. Cendoni

Venice, Ospedale della Pietà, 1714

11vv, ?

text ed. R. Kintzel and C. Muntz (SV 6, 2006)

Juditha triumphans devicta Holofernes barbarie

644

G. Cassetti

Venice, Ospedale della Pietà, 1716

5vv, SATB, 2 rec, 2 ob, 2 cl, S chalumeau,

2 tpt, tmp, 4 theorb., mand., va d’am, 5 viols, org, str, bc

I-Tn, preserved inc. (lacking sinfonia, 1 recit. and aria); facs., Siena, 1948; M (1971), CE

L’adorazione delli tre re magi al bambino Gesù nella capanna di Betlemme

645

?

Milan, S Felice, 9 Jan 1722

4vv, ?

text ed. R. Kintzel (SV 7, 2007)

Additional works

Dal trionfo le perdite ovvero Jefte, che sagrifica la sua figlia

Anh.116a

D. Canavese

Florence, [location not specified], 1716

?

multi-authored oratorio (oratorio-centone) with one original contribution by Vivaldi (aria ‘Senti come bel boschetto’ rv749.20); rev. as Il padre sacrificator della figla ovvero Jefte (Florence, 1719 or early 1720) (= rv Anh.116)

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Sonatas

Sources:

Sonate, vn, hpd (Venice, 1709); as op.2 (Amsterdam, 1712); as op.2 (London, 1721); facs. of Venice and Amsterdam editions (Florence, 2000); variants (Vivaldi’s authorization uncertain) also preserved in MSS in D-Bsa and I-Gl

VI sonate, vn/2 vn, bc, op.5 [continues numbering of op.2] (Amsterdam, 1716) [printed nos. given in parentheses]

VI sonates, vc, bc (Paris, 1740); also preserved in MS in F-Pn; facs. in Vivaldiana 2 (2003)

For violin and continuo

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Key

rv

F

Edition (M, CE, Op. Inc.)

Principal sources

Remarks

C

1

XIII,34

399, CE

op.2 no.6

C

2

XIII,11

369

D-Dl

facs. in Musik der Dresdener Hofkapelle (Leipzig, 1982); exact relationship of 5th movt to the remainder of the sonata is not clear; 2nd, 4th movts in rv4; first issue of M, no longer in print, does not contain 2nd movt

C

3

XIII,8

366, CE

Dl, GB-Mp, I-CF

All sources as facs. in Vivaldiana 3 (2006); Dresden source may contain alterations by Pisendel and appears to transmit an earlier version than Manchester source

C

4

--

--

A-Gd

Inc. (bc lost); 2nd, 4th movts in rv2

C

754

XIII,60

CE

GB-Mp

facs. in Vivaldiana 3 (2006)

C

815

--

CE

GB-Lfom

preserved in transcr. for kbd (?organ) solo; presumed original instrumentation for vn, bc

c

5

XIII,10

368

D-Dl

c

6

XIII,14

372, CE

D-Dl, GB-Mp

Dresden source publ. facs. in Musik der Dresdener Hofkapelle (Leipzig, 1982); both sources publ. as facs. in Vivaldiana 3 (2006); Dresden source appears to transmit an earlier version than Manchester source

c

7

A-Gd

Inc. (bc lost)

c

7a

XIII,61

CE

I-CF (2 MSS; both inc.), I-UDa (inc.)

different 3rd movt; one (complete) MS currently divided between I-CF and I-UDa

c

8

XIII,35

400, CE

op.2 no.7

D

9

XIII,39

404, CE

op.2 no.11

D

10

XIII,6

364

D-Dl

D

11

Op. Inc., CE

A-Gd

Inc. (bc lost); incl. in Breitkopf catalogue and music catalogue of the Collegium Wilhelminum, Strasbourg

D

755

XIII,53

CE

GB-Mp

facs. in Vivaldiana 3 (2006); 3rd and 4th movts in rv229 (as 2nd and 3rd movts, scoring differs)

D

798

XIII,62

CE

I-BGc

D

810

CE

D-Dl

also preserved in anonymous transcr. (in G) for rec (D-Bsb) formerly rv806; 3 movts publ. in A. Pizzolato’s op.1 no.5 (London, [c. 1750])

D

816

--

CE

GB-Lfom

preserved in transcr. for organ solo; presumed original instrumentation for vn, bc

d

12

XIII,7

365, CE

D-Dl, GB-Mp

Both sources publ. as facs. in Vivaldiana 3 (2006); 1st movt in rv08 and rv582 (as 2nd movt); Dresden source appears to transmit an earlier version than Manchester source

d

14

XIII,31

396, CE

op.2 no.3

Movt 1 paraphrased in I. Sieber XII Sonates à une Flute [...] (Amsterdam, [s.d.])

d

15

XIII,9

367

D-Dl

E♭

756

XIII,59

CE

GB-Mp

facs. in Vivaldiana 3 (2006)

e

16

XIII,37

402, CE

op.2 no.9

e

17

A-Gd

Inc. (bc lost); facs. in Vivaldiana 3 (2006)

e

17a

XIII,57

CE

GB-Mp

facs. in Vivaldiana 3 (2006); different 3rd movt also in rv314 (as 2nd movt)

F

18

XIII,41

430

op.5 no.1 (13)

F

19

XIII,47

491

F-Pc; GB-Lfom

facs. in Musik der Dresdener Hofkapelle (Leipzig, 1982); exact relationship of 5th movt to the remainder of the sonata is not clear; London source contains only a variant version of 2nd movt, preserved in transcr. for ?organ solo (?= portion of otherwise lost variant version of entire sonata)

F

20

XIII,32

397, CE

op.2 no.4, S-Uu

4th movt publ. in Medullae Musicae Being A Choice Collection of Airs (London, [?1727]) with attrib. to Mascitti; same movt transcr. for rec in I-Pac

f

21

XIII,38

403, CE

op.2 no.10

G

22

XIII,56

CE

B-Bc, GB-Mp

3rd movt in rv212a (as 2nd movt); see rv Anh.98; both sources publ. as facs. in Vivaldiana 3 (2006); Brussels source appears to transmit an earlier version than Manchester source

G

23

XIII,36

401, CE

op.2 no.8

G

25

XIII,13

371

D-Dl

facs. in Musik der Dresdener Hofkapelle (Leipzig, 1982); exact nature of the relationship between the seven movts found in source is unclear

g

26

XIII,15

373

D-Dl

g

27

XIII,29

394, CE

op.2 no.1

movts re-used (and adapted) in rv28 and 51

g

28

XIII,5

356

D-Dl

partly adapted from rv27; instrumentation not specified in source but presumably for vn (?or ob)

g

757

XIII,52

CE

GB-Mp, I-UDa

Both sources publ. as facs. in Vivaldiana 3 (2006); 3rd movt also in rv329 (as 2nd movt)

A

29

XIII,12

370

D-Dl

facs. in Musik der Dresdener Hofkapelle (Leipzig, 1982)

A

30

XIII,42

431

op.5 no.2 (14)

A

31

XIII,30

395, CE

op.2 no.2

A

758

XIII,55

CE

GB-Mp, I-Vc

1st and 3rd movts (from source in I-Vc) formerly numbered rv746 (withdrawn); both sources publ. as facs. in Vivaldiana 3 (2006); opening theme of 1st movt incl. in 3rd movt in A. Pizzolato’s op.1 no.5 (London, [c. 1750])

a

32

XIII,40

405, CE

op.2 no.12

B♭

33

XIII,43

432

op.5 no.3 (15)

B♭

34

XIII,16

374

D-Dl

instrumentation not specified in source but presumably for vn (?or ob)

B♭

759

XIII,54

CE

GB-Mp, D-Dl

Source in GB-Mp publ. as facs. in Vivaldiana 3 (2006)

b

35

XIII,44

433

op.5 no.4 (16)

b

35a

GB-Lam, A-RO

‘Sinfonia’; possibly an earlier version

b

36

XIII,33

398, CE

op.2 no.5

b

37

Op. Inc., CE

A-Gd

Inc. (bc lost)

b

760

XIII,58

CE

GB-Mp

facs. in Vivaldiana 3 (2006)

Lost, uncertain, doubtful, spurious

D

Anh.134

--

--

I-UDa

spurious (by A. Zani = op.1 no.12) (formerly rv785)

d

Anh.97

XIII,50

--

S-Skma

spurious (?by J.H. Roman) (formerly rv13)

G

Anh.140

XIII,49

529

D-WD

considered spurious (formerly rv24)

G

Anh.98

--

--

D-Dl

spurious pastiche opening with 3rd movt of rv22 (also used in rv212a), including at least one movt by G.B. Somis (3rd movt = op.2 no.5 movt 1) (formerly rv776)

B♭

791

--

--

?

Inc., authenticity uncertain; transcr. by P. Domokos in Magyar Zene (1962); present location of source unknown

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All sources publ. as facs. in Vivaldiana 2 (2003)

For cello and continuo

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Key

rv

F

Edition (M, CE)

Principal Sources

Remarks

E♭

39

XIV,8

504

I-Nc

e

40

XIV,5

477

VI sonates, no.5

F

41

XIV,2

474

VI sonates, no.2

g

42

XIV,9

530

D-WD

a

43

XIV,3

475

VI sonates, no.3

a

44

XIV,7

503

I-Nc

B♭

45

XIV,4

476

VI sonates, no.4

B♭

46

XIV,6

478

VI sonates, no.6, D-WD

B♭

47

XIV,1

473

VI sonates, no.1, I-Nc

Lost, uncertain, doubtful, spurious

d

38

--

lost; incl. in Breitkopf catalogue; see Vivaldiana 2 (2003)

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See also rv28 and 34, under Sonatas for Violin and Continuo

For wind instrument and continuo

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Key

rv

F

Edition (M, CE)

Principal sources

Instrument, remarks

F

52

XV,4

501

I-Vqs, BOL-CHa

rec; of the two sources in Bolivia, 1 possibly arr. for solo kbd entitled ‘La gloria mundi’ (2nd movt only), another probably for vn and bc entitled ‘Il Quixote’ (entire sonata; only vn pt survives)

c

53

XV,2

375

D-Dl

ob

Lost, uncertain, doubtful, spurious

C

48

XV,3

490

GB-Cu

fl; authenticity uncertain; facs. in IV sonate per flauto traverso e basso (Florence, 1986)

d

Anh.99

XV,5

517

S-Uu

fl; considered spurious (formerly rv49); facs. in IV sonate per flauto traverso e basso (Florence, 1986)

e

Anh.100

XV,6

S-Skma

fl; considered spurious (formerly rv50); facs. in IV sonate per flauto traverso e basso (Florence, 1986)

g

51

XV,9

CE

D-LEm

?fl/?ob; partially adapted from rv27; authenticity uncertain; intended instrumentation uncertain; facs. in IV sonate per flauto traverso e basso (Florence, 1986)

C

Anh.136

--

--

A-Wgm, A-Wn

rec; spurious (anonymous arrangement of a vn sonata by G. Meneghetti); (formerly rv809)

For additional spurious works, see: rv Anh.95, ‘Il pastor fido’, musette/vielle/fl/ob/vn, bc, ‘op.13’ (Paris, c. 1737) [= pastiche by Nicolas Chédeville] [formerly rv54–9]; also rv Anh.69

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Sonatas and related works for 2-4 parts

designated ‘sonata’ in sources unless otherwise stated

Sources:

Suonate da camera a 3, 2 vn, vle/hpd, op.1 (Venice, 1705); as op.1 (Amsterdam, 1715); as op.1 (Paris, c. 1739)

VI sonate, vn/2 vn, bc, op.5 [continues numbering of op.2] (Amsterdam, 1716) [printed nos. given in parentheses]

Sonatas for two violins (with continuo unless otherwise stated)

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Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE)

Principal sources

Remarks

C

60

XIII,48

528

D-WD

3rd movt with 2 vn unisoni

C

61

XIII,19

384, CE (forthcoming)

op.1 no.3

D

62

XIII,22

387, CE (forthcoming)

op.1 no.6

d

63

XIII,28

393, CE (forthcoming)

op.1 no.12

‘Follia’

d

64

XIII,24

389, CE (forthcoming)

op.1 no.8

E♭

65

XIII,23

388, CE (forthcoming)

op.1 no.7

E

66

XIII,20

385, CE (forthcoming)

op.1 no.4

e

67

XIII,18

383, CE (forthcoming)

op.1 no.2

F

68

XIII,3

57

I-Tn

bc optional

F

69

XIII,21

386, CE (forthcoming)

op.1 no.5

4th movt publ. as ‘Gavot by Vivaldi’ in A Collection of Marches & Aires (Edinburgh, [1761])

F

70

XIII,4

58

I-Tn

bc optional

G

71

XIII,1

17

I-Tn

bc optional; 2nd movt in rv516, along with material from outer movts

g

72

XIII,46

435

op.5 no.6 (18)

1st movt publ. (for vn and bc) in J.B. Cartier, L’art du Violon (Paris, 1798)

g

73

XIII,17

382, CE (forthcoming)

op.1 no.1

5th movt publ. in A Collection of Marches & Aires (Edinburgh, [1761])

g

74

XIII,51

CE

S-L

A

75

XIII,25

390, CE (forthcoming)

op.1 no.9

B♭

76

XIII,45

434

op.5 no.5 (17)

B♭

77

XIII,2

24

I-Tn

bc optional

B♭

78

XIII,26

391, CE (forthcoming)

op.1 no.10

b

79

XIII,27

392, CE (forthcoming)

op.1 no.11

Incl. in music catalogue of the Collegium Wilhelminum, Strasbourg

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(all labelled ‘sonata’ in sources unless otherwise stated)

Other sonatas & related works

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Key

rv

F

Edition (M, CE)

Principal sources

Remarks

For two instruments and continuo

A

800

--

CE

D-MGs

2 fl, bc; ‘Trio’ on title page, ‘Sonata’ on pts

c

81

XV,8

CE

S-L

2 ob, bc

c

83

XVI,1

20

I-Tn

vn, vc, bc

G

820

--

CE

D-Dl

vn, vc, bc; Inc. (score missing last page)

C

82

XVI,3

63

I-Tn

vn, lute, bc; ‘Trio’

g

85

XVI,4

75

I-Tn

vn, lute, bc; ‘Trio’

a

86

XV,1

18

I-Tn

rec, bn, bc

For three instruments with or without continuo

C

779

XVI, 11

CE

D-Dl

vl, ob, org (obbl.), chalumeau (opt.); without bc

C

779a

XVI, 11

CE

D-Dl

2 vn, ob, bc; inc.; source of rv779 contains indication of alternative instrumentation (only for first few bars)

C

801

--

CE

D-HRD

fl/ob/?vn, ob/vn, bn/vc, bc; source has erroneous attrib. to ‘Haendel’ in bc pt; formerly rv Anh.66; incl. in Sonsfeld catalogue

Lost, uncertain, doubtful, spurious

G

Anh.101

XV,7

S-L

2 fl, bc; considered spurious (formerly rv80)

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Chamber concertos for 2–6 diverse instruments and continuo

designated as ‘concerto’ in sources unless otherwise stated

with continuo unless otherwise stated

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Key

rv

F

Edition (M, CE)

Principal sources

Remarks

C

87

XII,30

155

I-Tn

rec, ob, 2 vn

C

88

XII,24

143

I-Tn

fl, ob, vn, bn

D

84

XII,43

355

D-Dl

fl, vn, ?bc (pt not labelled); genre not identified in source, but closely resembles style of his other chbr concs.

D

90

XII,9

42

I-Tn

fl, ob, vn, bn; ‘Il gardellino’; facs. in Vivaldiani 1 (2002); see rv90a and 90b for alternate instrumentation; revised and re-scored as rv428

D

90a

--

GB-Mp

rec, ob, vn, bn; facs. in Vivaldiani 1 (2002)

D

90b

--

GB-Mp

3 vn, vc; alternative instrumentation signalled in source for rv90a; facs. in Vivaldiani 1 (2002)

D

91

XII,27

149

I-Tn

fl, vn, bn

D

92

XII,7

39

I-Tn

rec, vn, bn; without bc

D

92a

--

I-Tn

rec, vn, vc; alternate instrumentation signalled in source for rv92

D

93

XII,15

62

I-Tn

lute, 2 vn

D

94

XII,25

144

I-Tn

rec, ob, vn, bn

D

95

XII,29

154

I-Tn

rec, ob, vn, bn; ‘La pastorella’; draws upon traditional pastorella ‘Nězábudka pri potóčku’; source indicates option to replace rec and ob with vns

D

95a

--

GB-Mp

3 vn, vc

d

96

XII,42

354

D-Dl

fl, vn, bn; genre not identified in source, but closely resembles style of his other chbr concs.

F

97

XII,32

248

I-Tn

va d’amore, 2 hn, 2 ob, bn

F

98

I-Tn

fl, ob, vn, bn; ‘Tempesta di mare’; revised and re-scored as rv433; see also alternative interpretation of the instrumentation as rv570; facs. in Vivaldiani 1 (2002)

F

99

XII,26

147

I-Tn

fl, ob, vn, bn; early, chbr version of rv571

F

100

XII,21

106

I-Tn

fl, vn, bn

G

101

XII,13

52

I-Tn

rec, ob, vn, bn; 2nd movt in rv242; revised and re-scored as rv437; facs. in Vivaldiani 1 (2002)

g

103

XII,4

23

I-Tn

rec, ob, bn; without bc

g

104

XII,5

33

I-Tn

fl, 2 vn, bn; ‘La notte’; revised and re-scored as rv439; facs. in Vivaldiani 1 (2002); incl. in music inventory from Ulm (see rv750)

g

104a

--

I-Tn

3 vn, ?bn; alternative instrumentation signalled in source for rv104; uncertain if vc intended as (unmarked) alternative to bn; facs. in Vivaldiani 1 (2002)

g

105

XII,20

103

I-Tn

rec, ob, vn, bn

g

106

XII,8

41

I-Tn

fl, vn, bn

g

106a

--

I-Tn

2 vn, vc; alternative instrumentation signalled in source for rv106

g

107

XII,6

40

D-Dl, I-Tn

fl, ob, vn, bn; 2nd movt in rv548 (as 2nd movt) and 764 (as 2nd movt)

a

108

XII,11

44

I-Tn

rec, 2 vn

Lost, uncertain, doubtful, spurious

D

751

--

2 fl, 2 vn, 2 bn (?= bn, bc), lost; incl. in Sonsfeld catalogue

D

Anh.102

XII,51

S-Skma

fl, 2 vn; considered spurious (formerly rv89)

G

Anh.103

XII,52

S-L

fl, 2 vn; incl. in music catalogue of the Collegium Wilhelminum, Strasbourg [w/o attrib.]; considered spurious (formerly rv102)

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Sinfonias and ripieno concertos for strings and continuo

List does not include multi-movement introductory sinfonias preserved with known links to specific vocal works; in Ryom these are catalogued under the rv number of the associated work with which they are presently preserved. See rv693 (sinfonia before Pt1, 2-movt ov. before Pt2), 699, 700, 703 (+2 hn), 709, 710, 711, 717, 718, 719, 725, 729 (+vn solo, 2 ob), 736, and 739. Many of the sinfonias listed below may have also been intended or used for performances of vocal works.

Source:

6 concerti, solo vn, 2 vn, va, org, vc, op.12 (Amsterdam, 1729)

View large

Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE)

Principal Sources

Remarks

C

109

XI,23

185

I-Tn

conc.

C

110

XI,25

200

I-Tn

conc.; 2nd movt in rv537

C

111

A-Wgm

conc.; 2nd movt in sinf. to rv739; outer movts in rv111a and sinf. to rv717

C

111a

D-Bsb, D-Dl

sinf.; rv111 with different 2nd movt; incl. in Breitkopf catalogue

C

112

XI,47

507

A-Wn, D-Dl

sinf.; Dresden source has locally added pts for 2 fl

C

113

XI,48

509

A-Wn

conc.

C

114

XI,44

493

F-Pc

conc.; 3rd movt in rv808

C

115

XI,38

309

I-Tn

‘Concerto ripieno’

C

117

XI,37

308

I-Tn

conc.; also used (with changes and diff. 2nd movt) as sinf. to rv693; 3rd movt appears (with changes) as sinf. to rv711 (as 3rd movt)

C

802

--

--

I-Pci

sinf.; ‘Improvisata’; inc. (missing va pt), ed. in SV 1 (2001)

c

118

XI,9

32

I-Tn

conc.

c

119

XI,20

177

F-Pc, I-Tn

conc.

c

120

XI,8

30

I-Tn

conc.

D

121

XI,30

246

F-Pc, I-Tn

conc.

D

123

XI,16

114

I-Tn

conc.; incl. in Esterházy catalogue (1740)

D

124

XI,42

464

op.12 no.3, I-Tn (frag.)

conc.; Turin source transmits score of final 32 bars of last movt

D

126

XI,15

113

I-Tn

conc.; ?inc.; 2nd movt in rv153; uncertain if 2nd movt preserved in source was intended for this concerto; cited in Vivaldi’s autograph incipit catalogue (Item no. 5)

D

786

I-Vc

sinf.; inc. (only va part survives)

d

127

XI,19

176

F-Pc, I-Tn

conc.

d

128

XI,31

251

I-Tn

conc.

d

129

XI,10

36

I-Tn

‘Concerto madrigalesco’; title signifies stylistic affinity to vocal polyphony; shares substantial material with the Kyrie rv587 and Magnificat rv610/610a/610b/611

E

131

XI,18

161

I-Tn

sinf.

e

133

XI,43

492

F-Pc

conc.

e

134

XI,13

56

I-Tn

originally ‘Concerto’, later altered to ‘Sinfonia’

F

135

XII,46

363

D-Dl

sinf.; Dresden source has locally added pts for 2 hn and bn

F

136

XI,14

59

F-Pc, I-Tn

conc.

F

138

XI,34

288

I-Tn

conc.

F

139

I-Tn

conc.; ?adapted as rv543 (with new movt added); solo vn in 1st and 3rd movts

F

140

XI,29

242

D-Dl, I-T

Turin source originally ‘Sinfonia’, changed to ‘Concerto’ when vn solo added to 2nd movt; Dresden source (‘Sinfonia’) has locally added pts for 2 ob, 2 hn, and bn

F

141

XI,28

241

I-Tn

conc.

F

142

XI,2

6

I-Tn

conc.

f

143

XI,35

289

I-Tn

conc.

G

145

XI,32

252

I-Tn

conc.

G

146

XI,41

361

D-Dl, D-SWl, I-Nc, N-T

‘Concerto’ in all sources except Dresden; incl. in Breitkopf catalogue (as ‘Sinfonia’ erroneously attrib. to ‘Roellig’)

G

147

XI,53

CE

D-Dl, S-L

sinf.; Dresden source has locally added pts for 2 fl and ob

G

149

XI,40

321

D-Dl

sinf.; facs. in Musik der Dresdener Hofkapelle (Leipzig, 1977) and Vivaldiana 5 (2007); used to introduce Il coro delle Muse (Venice, Pietà, 1740)

G

150

XI,36

290

F-Pc, I-Tn

conc.

G

151

XI,11

49

I-Tn

‘Concerto alla rustica’; 2 ob in 3rd movt (and elsewhere?)

g

152

XI,27

226

I-Tn

‘Concerto ripieno’

g

153

XI,33

287

I-Tn

conc.; sources transmit four versions, one with 2 solo vn; 2nd movt also transmitted (?re-used) in source of rv126

g

154

XI,39

310

F-Pc, I-Tn

conc.

g

155

XI,6

11

I-Tn

conc.; solo vn in 3rd and 4th movts

g

156

XI,17

115

I-Tn

conc.

g

157

XI,21

182

F-Pc, I-Tn

conc.

A

158

XI,4

8

I-Tn

‘Concerto ripieno’

A

159

XI,1

5

F-Pc, I-Tn

conc.; 2 solo vn, solo vc in 3rd movt

A

160

XI,22

184

F-Pc, I-Tn

conc.

a

161

XI,26

201

I-Tn

conc.

B♭

162

XII,44

359

D-Dl

sinf.; Dresden source has locally added pts for 2 fl, 2 ob, and bn

B♭

163

XI,5

9

I-Tn

conc.; ‘Conca’; title signifies imitation of the sound of a blown conch shell

B♭

164

XI,12

50

F-Pc, I-Tn

conc.

B♭

165

I,78

172

I-Tn

conc.

B♭

166

XI,3

7

I-Tn

conc.

B♭

167

XI,24

190

I-Tn

conc.

b

168

XI,52

518

S-L, S-Skma, S-Uu

sinf.

Lost, uncertain, doubtful, spurious

C

741

--

--

--

Lost; cited as incipit in lost Dresden inventory (Bachmann, 1913)

C

Anh.93

--

--

D-Dl

Attrib. to Albinoni in source considered doubtful; Vivaldi’s authorship uncertain

C

Anh.144

XI,46

506

D-Dl, F-AG

Considered spurious (formerly rv116)

D

Anh.155

XII,45

362

D-Dl

Dresden source has locally added rts for 2 ob and bn; considered spurious (formerly rv122)

D

Anh.156

D-Bsb

Inc. (lacking bc); incl. in Breitkopf catalogue; considered spurious (formerly rv125)

E

Anh.96

XI,50

515

D-Bds, S-L

Spurious (by J.G. Janitsch) (formerly rv132); incl. in Breitkopf catalogue (attrib. Vivaldi)

F

Anh.157

XI,51

516

D-Bds

Incl. in Breitkopf catalogue; considered spurious (formerly rv137)

G

Anh.68

XII,49

360

A-Wn, D-Dl

Considered spurious (attrib. to A. Gallo in Vienna source); (formerly rv148); Dresden source contains locally added pt for fl (?other added wind pts lost)

G

Anh.70

XI,49

512

A-Wn

‘Introdutione’; considered spurious; alternative attrib. to G. Tartini (as sonata g31) questioned; (formerly rv144)

A

Anh.85

--

--

D-Dl

Anon. in source; Vivaldi’s authorship uncertain

For additional uncertain, doubtful, and spurious works, see rv Anh.2 (by G.B. Sammartini), 3, 4 (by J.A. Hasse), 5 (by G.B. Sammartini), 6 (by A. Brioschi), 135

View large

Sepolcro sinfonias

For strings with continuo

View large

Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE)

Principal Sources

Remarks

130

E♭

XVI,2

21

I-Tn

‘Suonata a 4 al Santo Sepolcro’

169

b

XI,7

22

I-Tn

‘Sinfonia al Santo Sepolcro’; bass pt indicates ‘Senza Organi ò Cembali’

View large

Solo concertos

with strings and continuo

Sources:

Apart from opp.3 and 4, source list only includes first editions to which opus numbers were assigned; additional 18th-century first editions and anthology publications are listed alongside individual works under ‘Remarks’

L’estro armonico (2 bks), op.3 (Amsterdam, 1711); different order of contents in English ed. (London, 1714 or 1715 [Pt 1] and 1717 [Pt 2]) [numbering taken from Amsterdam ed.]

La stravaganza (2 bks), op.4 (Amsterdam, 1716); English ed. (London, 1728) [=Walsh op.4] includes selected works from Amsterdam ed. plus an additional concerto (rv291)

VI concerti a 5 stromenti, op.6 (Amsterdam, 1719)

[12] Concerti a 5 stromenti (2 bks), op.7 (Amsterdam, 1720) [items in each book numbered 1 to 6]

Il cimento dell’armonia e dell’inventione (2 bks), op.8 (Amsterdam, 1725)

La cetra (2 bks), op.9 (Amsterdam, 1727)

VI concerti, fl, str, op.10 (Amsterdam, 1729)

6 concerti, op.11 (Amsterdam, 1729)

6 concerti, op.12 (Amsterdam, 1729)

For violin

View large

Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE, Op. Inc.)

Principal sources

Remarks

C

170

I,172

379

D-Dl

C

171

I,93

194

I-Tn

‘p. S. M. C. C.’ = ?intended for Emperor Charles VI?

C

172

I,140

322

D-Dl

1 Dresden source transmits 1st and 2nd movts of rv172 with 3rd movt of concerto by C. Tessarini (formerly rv172a, withdrawn)

C

173

I,213

465

op.12 no.4, S-L

C

174

Lost; incl. in Ringmacher catalogue

C

175

I,232

508

A-Wn

Formerly rv Anh.104

C

177

I,67

160

D-Dl, I-Tn

C

178

I,31

85

op.8 no.12

ob indicated as alternative solo instrument (see rv449); movts 1 and 2 adapted by N. Chédeville in Le Printems ou les Saisons amusantes (Paris, 1739), no.2

C

179

D-Dl

Publ. in VI Concerti a Cinque Stromenti (Amsterdam, 1736), no.3; see also rv581 (version in due cori)

C

179a

I-Vc

Inc. (only vn solo part survives); different 3rd movt

C

180

I,27

81

op.8 no.6

‘Il piacere’; adapted by N. Chédeville in Le Printems ou les Saisons amusantes (Paris, 1739), no.5

C

181

Tn

C

181a

I,47

122

op.9 no.1

Re-uses movts 1 and 2 of rv181 with 3rd movt of rv183; publ. in Select Harmony (London, 1730), no.3

C

182

I,94

195

Tn

C

183

I,111

256

A-Wn, I-Tn

3rd movt re-used in rv181a

C

184

I,146

328

D-Dl

C

185

I,186

424

op.4 no.7

2 vn and vc solo in 4th movt; portion of 4th movt (also found in rv188, 447, and the sinf. to rv739a) used in N. Chédeville, Il Pastor Fido (see rv Anh.95), Sonata 2

C

186

I,3

13

I-Tn

C

187

I,135

311

Tn

C

188

I,198

443

op.7/i no.2

Portion of 4th movt (also found in rv185, 447, and the sinf. to rv739a) used in N. Chédeville, Il Pastor Fido (see rv Anh.95), Sonata 2

C

189

I,169

376

A-Wn, D-Dl, F-Pc, GB-Mp, I-Nc

Publ. in 6 Concerti a Cinque Stromenti (Amsterdam, 1735), no.1; cited in Vivaldi’s autograph incipit catalogue (Item no.2)

C

190

I,46

120

Tn

C

191

I,114

259

Tn

C

192

I,68

162 (+ finale of RV192a)

I-Tn, D-Dl

‘Sinfonia’; one source in Dresden concludes with 3rd movt of Albinoni’s op.7 no.10

C

192a

I-Tn

Version with presumed substitute finale preserved in Turin source of rv192

C

193

Lost; incl. in Rheda catalogue

C

194

I,73

167

Tn

C

195

I,217

481

D-Dl

Publ. in VI Concerts à 5 & 6 Instrumens (Amsterdam, 1716), no.6

c

196

I,189

427

op.4 no.10, Dl

Source formerly in D-DS destroyed in WW2; kbd arr. in Anne Dawson’s Book (GB-Mp)

c

197

I,79

173

I-Tn

c

198

D-Dl

c

198a

I,58

133

op.9 no.11

Different 2nd movt

c

199

I,2

4

Dl, I-Tn

‘Il sospetto’

c

200

Lost; incl. in Brno catalogue

c

201

I,105

230

Tn

c

202

I,210

461

op.11 no.5, A-Wn, D-Bsb, Dl

Sources transmit variants of 2nd and 3rd movts

c

761

I,239

CE

GB-Mp

‘Amato bene’

c

771

--

--

I-Vc

Inc. (only vn solo pt survives)

D

203

A-Wn

Inc. (lacking vn solo pt)

D

204

I,190

428

op.4 no.11, I-Nc

2 vn solo in 1st movt; Naples source (?inc., lacks va pt) probably transmits earlier version; also publ. in Three Celebrated Concertos (London, by 1730); kbd arr. in Anne Dawson’s Book (GB-Mp); incl. in Rheda catalogue

D

205

I,149

331

D-Dl

Autograph score transmits two versions of 3rd movt (M contains first version only)

D

206

I,228

497

Dl, SWl

D

207

I,89

188

op.11 no.1, Dl, I-Tn, Vc

D

208

I,138

314

D-SWl, I-CF, Tn

‘Grosso Mogul’; basis for bwv594; Turin source (basis for M) lacks written-out cadenzas

D

208a

I,206

452

op.7/ii no.5, N-T

Without cadenzas in 1st and 3rd movts, different 2nd movt; publ. in Select Harmony (London, 1730), no. 11; publ. for vn alone in Michel Corrette, L’Art de se perfectionner dans le Violon (Paris, 1782)

D

209

I,120

286

I-Tn

D

210

I,30

84

op.8 no.11, D-SWl, I-Tn

Numerous alterations preserved in Turin source

D

211

I,116

261

Tn

Source transmits two versions of 3rd movt (M contains 1st version up through ms. 181, then 2nd version of ms. 182–6)

D

212

D-Dl, I-Tn

Inc.; ‘Per la Solennità della S. Lingua di S. Antonio in Padova 1712’; Dresden source contains locally added pts for 2 ob and three different slow movts

D

212a

I,136

312

Tn

Different 2nd movt identical with 3rd movt of rv22, as well as other differences in 1st movt

D

213

I,162

347

D-Dl

Locally added pts for 2 fl, 2 ob; numerous alterations transmitted in sources

D

213a

I-Vc

Inc.; different 3rd movt

D

214

I,207

453

op.7/ii no.6, D-SWl, I-Pci, N-T, S-L

Publ. in Select Harmony (London, 1730), no.12; publ. for vn alone in Michel Corrette, L’Art de se perfectionner dans le Violon (Paris, 1782)

D

215

I,132

305

I-Tn

D

216

I,195

439, CE

op.6 no.4

D

217

I,19

69

Tn

D

218

I,134

307

Tn

D

219

I,153

335

D-Dl

D

220

I,218

482

S-HÄ

Publ. in Concerti a Cinque (Amsterdam, 1717), no.6

D

222

I,124

294

I-Tn, Vc

D

224

I,158

343

D-Dl

Facs. in Quattro concerti autografi della Sächsische Landesbibliothek di Dresda (Siena, 1949)

D

224a

Dl

Different 2nd movt identical with that of rv772

D

225

I,80

174

Dl, I-Tn

D

226

I,129

302

D-Dl, I-Tn

D

227

I,234

513

A-Wgm

D

228

I,160

345

D-Dl

D

229

I,45

117

Dl, I-Tn, Vc

2nd and 3rd movts in rv755 (as 3rd and 4th movts, scoring differs); sources preserve two versions of 3rd movt; M combines both versions of the 3rd movt

D

230

I,178

414, CE

op.3 no.9, D-SWl

Basis for bwv972; kbd arr. in Anne Dawson’s Book (GB-Mp)

D

231

I,8

31

I-Tn

D

232

I,18

68

Tn

D

233

I,133

306

Tn

D

234

I,10

37

GB-Mp, I-Gl, Tn

‘L’inquietudine’

D

752

--

--

Lost; incl. in Sonsfeld catalogue

D

772

--

--

I-Vc

Incl. (only vn solo pt survives)

D

818

--

--

Vc

Incl. (only vn solo pt survives); now considered genuine; formerly rv Anh.72; 3rd movt in rv114

d

235

I,113

258

Tn

d

236

op.8 no.9, Tn

Originally composed for ob (see rv454), rev. and publ. for vn; movts 1 and 2 adapted by N. Chédeville in Le Printems ou les Saisons amusantes (Paris, 1739), no.6

d

237

I,143

325

D-Dl

d

238

I,56

131

op.9 no.8

d

239

I,197

441, CE

op.6 no.6, Dl

d

240

I,142

324

Dl

Facs. of score in Quattro concerti autografi della Sächsische Landesbibliothek di Dresda (Siena, 1949)

d

241

I,154

336

Dl, GB-DRc

d

242

I,28

82

op.8 no.7, D-Dl

2nd movt in rv101 and 437; Dresden source transmits 1st movt only (early version); publ. in Select Harmony (London, 1730), no.1; movts 1 and 2 adapted by N. Chédeville in Le Printems ou les Saisons amusantes (Paris, 1739), nos.5 and 3

d

243

I,11

45

I-Tn

vn ‘senza cantin’ [i.e. without using the e-string]; solo pt scordatura (with 4 strings) in 3rd movt

d

244

I,212

463

op.12 no.2

d

245

I,151

333

D-Dl

d

246

I,119

285

Dl, I-Tn

d

247

I,126

296

Tn

d

248

I,21

74

Tn, Vc

d

249

I,187

425

op.4 no.8

Incl. in music catalogue of the Collegium Wilhelminum, Strasbourg

d

769

--

198

Tn

Adaptation of rv393; M contains version for vn but identified as a concerto for va d’amore

d

770

--

197

Tn

Adaptation of rv395 (with diff. 2nd movt); formerly rv395a; M contains version for vn but identified as a concerto for va d’amore

d

813

--

--

A-Wn, S-L

Basis for bwv979 (formerly rv Anh.10); attribution to Torelli in Vienna source now considered erroneous; CE (forthcoming)

E♭

250

I,102

227

I-Tn

E♭

251

I,109

254

Tn

Source also contains Vivaldi’s short autograph incipit catalogue of his compositions

E♭

252

I,164

349

Af, D-Dl

E♭

253

I,26

80

op.8 no.5, Dl, GB-Mp

‘La tempesta di mare’; Dresden source has locally added pts for 2 ob; a further source formerly in D-DS (destroyed)

E♭

254

I,9

38

I-Tn

E♭

255

Lost; incl. in Brno catalogue

E♭

256

I,231

502

Nc

‘Il Ritiro’

E♭

257

I,92

193

Tn

E♭

258

I,75

169

Tn

E♭

259

I,193

437, CE

op.6 no.2, D-Dl, WD

Publ. in Select Harmony (1730), no.5; incl. in Brtnice (Pirnitz) catalogue; portion of 1st movt used in N. Chédeville, Il Pastor Fido (see rv Anh.95), Sonata 3

E♭

260

I,166

352

Dl, I-Vc

Facs. of Dresden score in Quattro concerti autografi della Sächsische Landesbibliothek di Dresda (Siena, 1949)

E♭

261

I,131

304

Tn, Vc

2 vn solo in 1st movt

E♭

262

I,156

340

D-Dl

E

263

I-Tn

E

263a

I,48

123

op.9 no.4

Different 3rd movt identical with that of rv762; publ. for vn alone in Michel Corrette, L’Art de se perfectionner dans le Violon (Paris, 1782)

E

264

I,72

166

Tn

E

265

I,179

417, CE

op.3 no.12

Basis for bwv976; kbd arr. in Anne Dawson’s Book (GB-Mp); a further kbd arr. formerly in D-DS (destroyed)

E

266

I,84

180

Tn

E

267

I,145

327

D-Dl

E

267a

I-Vc

Inc. (only vn solo pt survives); different 2nd movt

E

268

I,7

29

F-Pc, I-Tn

E

269

I,22

76, CE

op.8 no.1, F-Pc, GB-Mp

‘La primavera’; Manchester source transmits earlier version; multiple adaptations exist (by Vivaldi and others)

E

270

I,4

15

Mp, I-Tn

‘Il riposo per il Santo Natale’

E

270a

Vc

Inc. (only vn solo pt survives); different 2nd movt

E

271

I,127

297

A-Wn, I-Tn

‘L’Amoroso’; incl. in music catalogue of the Collegium Wilhelminum, Strasbourg

E

762

I,225

494

F-Pc, GB-Mp

Paris source (basis for M) transmits version in D (formerly rv223); Manchester source considered more authoritative; 3rd movt in rv263a; incl. in Sonsfeld catalogue

e

273

I,70

164

I-Tn

Incl. in Brno catalogue

e

275

I,220

484

A-Wn, CH-Zz, D-DS, S-L

Publ. in Concerti a Cinque (Amsterdam, 1717), no.12; arr. for organ (as work by ‘Sig.r Meck’) by J.G. Walther; version for vn or fl transmitted in Darmstadt with diff. 2nd movt (?by C. Graupner) considered spurious (formerly rv275a for vn, rv430 for fl)

e

276

I,216

480

A-Wn

Publ. in Concerts à 5, 6 & 7 Instrumens (Amsterdam, 1714), no.1; Vienna source (= ?earlier version) contains additional measures in 3rd movt

e

277

I,208

459

op.11 no.2, Wn

‘Il Favorito’

e

278

I,37

93

I-Tn

e

279

I,181

419

op.4 no.2, D-Dl

e

280

I,196

440, CE

op.6 no.5

e

281

I,74

168

I-Tn

F

282

I,33

87

Tn

F

283

I,128

301

Tn

F

284

I,188

426

op.4 no.9

Publ. in Three Celebrated Concertos (London, by 1730); 1st movt in rv775 and 285

F

285

I,161

346

D-Dl

1st movt in rv775 and 284

F

285a

I,201

446

op.7/i no.5

Different 1st movt

F

286

I,20

70

A-Wn, D-SWl, GB-Mp, I-Nc, Tn, Vc, S-L

Turin source inscribed ‘Concerto per la Solennità di S Lorenzo’; Lund source with attrib. to ?J.G. Graun; incl. in Vivaldi’s incipit catalogue as Item 6; incl. in Brno and Schwerin music catalogues

F

287

I,88

187

I-Tn

F

288

I,17

66

Tn

F

289

I,71

165

Tn

F

290

Lost; incl. in Brno catalogue

F

291

I,215

479

Walsh op.4, no.4

2nd movt in rv357 (with slight differences)

F

292

I,167

357

A-Wn, D-Dl

Vienna source with attrib. to G. Chelleri

F

293

I,24

78, CE

op.8 no.3, GB-Mp

‘L’Autunno’; Manchester source transmits earlier version; movts 1 and 3 adapted by N. Chédeville in Le Printems ou les Saisons amusantes (Paris, 1739), no.4; publ. for vn alone in Michel Corrette, L’Art de se perfectionner dans le Violon (Paris, 1782)

F

294

Mp

‘Il Ritiro’

F

294a

I,205

451

op.7/ii no.4, A-Wn, D-Dl, S-L

‘Il Ritiro’, different 2nd movt; two Dresden sources have locally added pts for 2 ob; publ. in Select Harmony (London, 1730), no.8; sources do not agree on instrumentation of accompaniment for 2nd movt

F

295

I,130

303

I-Tn

F

296

I,66

158

Tn

F

794

--

--

Vc

Inc. (only vn 2 and bc pts survive)

f

297

I,25

79, CE

op.8 no.4, GB-Mp

‘L’Inverno’; Manchester source transmits earlier version; M based on defective exemplar of op.8 that lacked inserted leaf with vc obbligato for 2nd movt; 2nd movt adapted by N. Chédeville in Le Printems ou les Saisons amusantes (Paris, 1739), no.4; publ. for vn alone in Michel Corrette, L’Art de se perfectionner dans le Violon (Paris, 1782)

G

298

I,191

429

op.4 no.12, D-Dl

Dresden source transmits 9 addl measures in 3rd movt; incl. in Rheda catalogue; 1st movt arr. kbd in Anne Dawson’s Book (GB-Mp)

G

300

I,49

124

op.9 no.10

G

301

I,182

420

op.4 no.3, S-L

Lund source transmits variant version of 3rd movt; kbd arr. in Anne Dawson’s Book (GB-Mp); incl. in music catalogue of the Collegium Wilhelminum, Strasbourg

G

302

I,168

358

D-Dl, F-Pc, GB-Mp

Paris source with attrib. to G.B. Somis

G

303

I,103

228

D-Mbs, I-Tn

G

304

Lost; incl. in Brno catalogue; vn solo scordatura

G

305

Lost; incl. in Ringmacher catalogue

G

306

I,87

186

Tn

G

307

I,110

255

Tn

G

308

I,209

460

op.11 no.4, Vc

Incl. in Breitkopf catalogue

G

309

‘Il Mare tempestoso’; lost; incl. in Brno catalogue

G

310

I,173

408, CE

op.3 no.3, S-L, US-BEm

Incl. in Rheda catalogue; basis for bwv978; anon. arr. for kbd in F-Pn and US-Cu; arr. for carillon by J. de Gruytters (source in B-Ac)

G

312

I,107

247

I-Tn

G

314

I,91

192

D-Dl, GB-Lbl, Mp, I-Tn

Sources transmit variants of 2nd movt; 2nd movt in rv17a (as 3rd movt)

G

314a

D-Dl

Different 2nd movt

g

315

I,23

77, CE

op.8 no.2, GB-Mp, I-Gl, S-L

‘L’Estate’; Manchester and Genoa sources transmit earlier versions; frag. of 1st movt transmitted in NL-At; publ. for vn alone in Michel Corrette, L’Art de se perfectionner dans le Violon (Paris, 1782)

g

316

Lost; formerly in D-DS (destroyed); basis for bwv975

g

316a

I,185

423

op.4 no.6, CH-Zz

Different 3rd movt; arr. kbd in Anne Dawson’s Book (GB-Mp); portion of 1st movt used in N. Chédeville, Il Pastor Fido (see rv Anh.95), Sonata 6

g

317

I,211

462

op.12 no.1

g

318

I,194

438, CE

op.6 no.3

g

319

I,165

351

D-Dl

Source contains locally added pts for 2 ob, bn

g

320

Op. Inc., CE

I-Tn

Inc. (one or more concluding folios missing)

g

321

I,122

292

Tn

g

322

A-Wn

Inc. (lacking vn solo pt)

g

323

I,147

329

D-Dl

g

324

I,192

436, CE

op.6 no.1

Publ. in Select Harmony (London, 1730), no.9

g

325

I,108

253

I-Tn

g

326

I,199

444

op.7/i no.3, D-Dl (2nd movt)

Publ. in Select Harmony (London, 1730), no.6

g

327

I,112

257

Tn

g

328

I,82

178

D-Dl, I-Tn, US-BEm

g

329

I,152

334

D-Dl

Incl. in Sonsfeld catalogue; 2nd movt in rv757 as 3rd movt

g

330

I,36

92

I-Tn

g

331

I,125

295

Tn

g

332

I,16

65

op.8 no.8, Tn

Publ. in Select Harmony (London, 1730), no.2; movts 1 and 3 adapted by N. Chédeville in Le Printems ou les Saisons amusantes (Paris, 1739), no.3

g

333

I,81

175

Tn

g

334

I,52

127

op.9 no.3, GB-Mp

Manchester source transmits different (?earlier) version; ?adapted from RV460 with revisions

A

335

I,223

487

Mp, I-AN, N-T, S-L, Skma, Uu

Publ. as The Favourite Concerto (London, 1717), Two Celebrated Concertos (London, 1720), no.1, and Vivaldi’s Cuckow Concerto (London, [between 1767 and 1769]); Swedish sources with different 2nd movt by J.H. Roman; Uppsala source with 2 solo vn (formerly rv518); Ancona source (formerly rv335a) entitled ‘Il rosignuolo’ with 2nd movt from rv Anh.14; M based on exemplar lacking vn 2 and concertino bc parts

A

336

I,90

191

op.11 no.3, I-Tn

A

337

Lost; incl. in Brno catalogue

A

339

I,227

496

D-SWl

A

340

I,141

323

Dl

A

341

I,148

330

Dl

Publ. in 6 Concerti a Cinque Stromenti (Amsterdam, 1735), no.4

A

342

I,224

489

GB-Cfm

Facs. in Fac-simile di un autografo di Antonio Vivaldi, ed. O. Rudge (Siena, 1947)

A

343

I,39

100

D-Dl, I-Tn, Vc

‘con Violini d’accordatura diversa’. Additional source formerly in D-DS (destroyed); solo and ripieno vns scordatura

A

344

I,155

339

D-Dl

Inc. (probably missing one or more bass pts)

A

345

I,51

126

op.9 no.2, Dl

Publ. in Select Harmony (London, 1730), no.4; scoring of 2nd movt confused in all printed editions (including M); for correct scoring, see Dresden source and directions in bass pt of early printed editions; publ. for vn alone in Michel Corrette, L’Art de se perfectionner dans le Violon (Paris, 1782)

A

346

I,104

229

I-Tn

A

347

I,184

422

op.4 no.5

Additional source formerly in D-DS (destroyed); publ. in Two Celebrated Concertos (London, 1720), no.2; incl. in Rheda catalogue; kbd arr. in Anne Dawson’s Book (GB-Mp) and in GB-Cfm

A

348

I,54

129

op.9 no.6, GB-Mp, I-Nc

vn solo scordatura; Amsterdam edition (and M) lack the concluding tutti of the 1st movt

A

349

I,123

293

D-Dl, GB-Mp, I-Tn, Vc

Additional source formerly in D-DS (destroyed)

A

350

I,106

245

Tn

A

352

I,5

16

Tn

A

353

I,137

313

Tn

A

763

I,240

CE

GB-Mp, I-Vc

‘L’Ottavina’

A

768

--

--

Tn

Adaptation of rv396; different 2nd movt (formerly rv744)

A

792

--

--

Vc

Inc. (only pts for vn 1 and va survive)

A

817

--

CE

D-Dl

Now considered genuine; formerly rv Anh.86

a

354

I,200

445

op.7/i no.4, GB-Mp

a

355

I,236

519

S-Uu

Formerly rv Anh.107

a

355a

B-LVu

Leuven source transmits variant of unknown origin (formerly rv Anh.107a) = arr. of lost ?authentic variant of rv355

a

356

I,176

411, CE

op.3 no.6, S-Skma

a

357

I,183

421

op.4 no.4

2nd movt in rv291; Walsh edition (as op.4 no.6) transmits 2nd movt with slight differences (London, 1728); kbd arr. in Anne Dawson’s Book (GB-Mp)

a

358

I,53

128

op.9 no.5, D-Dl, S-Skma

Stockholm source with attrib. to G. Piantanida

B♭

359

I,55

130

op.9 no.7

B♭

360

A-Wn

Inc. (source lacks vn solo pt)

B♭

361

I,214

466

op.12 no.6

B♭

362

I,29

83

op.8 no.10, D-Dl, I-Tn

‘La Caccia’; movt 1 adapted by N. Chédeville in Le Printems ou les Saisons amusantes (Paris, 1739), no.2

B♭

363

I,163

348

D-Dl, I-Vc

‘Il Corneto da Posta’

B♭

364

I,219

483

D-SWl

Publ. in Concerti a Cinque (Amsterdam, 1717), no.8

B♭

364a

Dl

Different 2nd movt; publ. in L’élite des concerto [sic] italiens (Paris, 1742–51), no.1

B♭

365

I,69

163

I-Tn

Source transmits 2 versions of 3rd movt; M presents 2nd version of 3rd movt

B♭

366

I,150

332

D-Dl, I-Vc

‘Il Carbonelli’; connected to G.S. Carbonelli?; sources transmit slightly differing versions

B♭

367

I,1

1

Tn

Incl. in Brno catalogue

B♭

368

I,121

291

Tn

B♭

369

I,65

157

D-Dl, I-Tn

2 vn solo in 1st movt; 3 vn solo in 2nd movt

B♭

370

I,95

199

D-Dl, I-Tn

Sources transmit multiple versions of 1st movt

B♭

371

I,117

262

Tn

Incl. in Breitkopf catalogue and Brno catalogues

B♭

372

I,118

284

Tn

B♭

372a

--

--

Vc

Incl. (only pts for vn 1, vn 2, and va survive); different 2nd movt; formerly rv790

B♭

374

I,202

447

op.7/i no.6

B♭

375

I,32

86

I-Tn

B♭

376

I,76

170

Tn

B♭

377

I,230

499

D-SWl, S-L

B♭

378

Op. Inc., CE

I-Tn

Inc. (frag. of 1st movt only)

B♭

379

I,86

183

op.12 no.5, D-Dl, I-Tn

Incl. in Breitkopf catalogue

B♭

380

I,15

64

Tn

B♭

381

I,235

514

D-Bds, S-Uu

Basis for bwv980; 1st movt also in rv383a; Uppsala source transmits version with 2 vn solo (formerly rv528)

B♭

382

I,233

511

A-Wn

B♭

383

I,170

377

D-Dl

B♭

383a

I,180

418

op.4 no.1, PL-GD

Different 1st movt almost identical with that of rv381; publ. in Three Celebrated Concertos (London, [by 1730]); kbd arr. in Anne Dawson’s Book (GB-Mp) and in GB-Cfm; portion publ. for vn alone in The Musical Pocket Book (London, c. 1750)

B♭

745

--

Op. Inc., CE

I-Tn

?Inc. (single movt only)

b

384

I,144

326

D-Dl

b

386

I,115

260

I-Tn

b

387

I,83

179

Tn, Vc

b

388

I,171

378

D-Dl

b

389

I,38

96

I-Tn

b

390

I,77

171

Tn

Incl. in Brno catalogue

b

391

I,50

125

op.9 no.12, A-Wn, GB-Mp, I-Tn

vn solo scordatura

Lost, uncertain, doubtful, spurious

C

176

I,226

495

F-Pc

Authenticity uncertain

C

Anh.143

D-Dl

Probably spurious; incl. in Ringmacher catalogue attrib. to Vivaldi (incipit matches concerto by C. Tessarini in D-Dl); formerly rv174

e

Anh.64, 64a

D-SWl (attrib. J.A. Hasse), GB-Mp (attrib. A.M. Scaccia)

?Spurious (formerly rv272); incl. in inventory by Aloys Fuchs (1839) with attribution to Vivaldi; Schwerin version for fl (= rv Anh.64); Manchester version for vn (= rv Anh.64a)

e

Anh.106

I,238

S-L, SK

Authenticity uncertain (formerly rv274)

F

Anh.154

I-Vc

Probably spurious (by ?Francesco Brusa), formerly rv773

G

299

I,203

449

op.7/ii no.2, D-Dl

Authenticity uncertain; publ. in Select Harmony (London, 1730), no.10 (attrib. to Vivaldi); basis for bwv973; 2nd movt also preserved in concerto attrib. to G. Visconti (D-Dl)

A

Anh.65

I,221

485

SWl (attrib. to J. Meck), S-L (attrib. Vivaldi)

Authenticity uncertain (formerly rv338); publ. in VI Concerti à 5 Stromenti (Amsterdam, 1719), no.6 (no attrib.) and in Select Harmony (London, 1730), no.7 (attrib. to Vivaldi)

A

Anh.150

D-Dl

Probably spurious; incl. in Ringmacher catalogue attrib. to Vivaldi (incipit matches concerto by G. Meneghetti); formerly rv351

B♭

Anh.153

I,204

450

op.7/ii no.3, D-Dl

Probably spurious (formerly rv373)

b

Anh.108

I,229

498

D-SWl

Probably spurious (formerly rv385)

For additional uncertain, doubtful, and spurious works, see rv Anh.7 (T. Albinoni), 8 (F. Jiráneck?), 9 (F.M. Veracini?), 11–12 (both by J.-E. von Sachsen-Weimar), 13 (G.B. Somis), 14 (F.M. Veracini), 15, 62 (F. Kreisler), 72, 73 (G. Tartini), 74, 75 (M. D’Alay?), 87, 105, 128–30, 131 (T. Albinoni), 132 (G. Torelli), 133 (G.M. Alberti); Concerto in G Minor in Concerts à 5, 6 & 7 Instrumens (Amsterdam, E. Roger, 1714), no.4 (rv deest)

View large

For ‘violino in tromba marina’

View large

Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE)

Principal sources

Remarks

D

221

I,97

203

I-Tn

G

311

I,96

202

I-Tn

G

313

I,64

156

Tn

View large

For viola d’amore

View large

Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE)

Principal sources

Remarks

D

392

II,5

337

D-Dl

d

393

II,4

I-Tn

Adapted for vn as rv769

d

394

II,2

196

Tn

d

395

Tn

Adapted for vn, with diff. 2nd movt, as rv770 (formerly rv395a)

A

396

II,1

189

Tn

Adapted for vn as rv768

a

397

II,6

341

D-Dl, I-Tn

View large

For cello

View large

Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE)

Principal sources

Remarks

C

398

III,8

218

I-Tn

C

399

III,6

211

Tn

C

400

III,3

204

Tn

c

401

III,1

19

Tn

c

402

III,27

527

D-WD

D

403

III,16

235

I-Tn

d

405

III,24

524

WD

d

406

III,7

212

I-Tn

1st movt, with alterations, for bn as rv481 (1st movt)

d

407

III,23

523

D-WD

E♭

408

III,5

206

I-Tn

e

409

XII,22

137

Tn

with solo bn

e

787

--

--

Vc

Inc. (only va pt survives)

F

410

III,17

243

Tn

F

411

III,14

233

Tn

F

412

III,11

221

Tn

G

413

III,12

231

Tn

G

414

III,19

317

Tn

?Later version for fl as rv438

g

416

III,26

526

D-WD

g

417

III,15

234

I-Tn

a

418

III,18

244

Tn

a

419

III,10

220

Tn

a

420

III,21

521

D-WD

a

421

III,13

232

I-Tn

a

422

III,4

205

D-Dl, WD, I-Tn

B♭

423

III,25

525

D-WD

B♭

788

--

--

I-Vc

Inc. (only va pt survives)

b

424

III,9

219

Tn

Lost, uncertain, doubtful, spurious

D

Anh.145

III,20

500

D-SWl

Spurious (formerly rv404)

G

Anh.146

III,22

522

D-WD

Spurious (formerly rv415)

View large

For mandolin

View large

Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE)

Principal sources

Remarks

C

425

V,1

98

I-Tn

View large

For flute

View large

Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE,

Op. Inc.)

Principal sources

Remarks

D

427

VI,3

102

I-Tn

D

428

VI,14

456

op.10 no.3, DK-Aalholm Slot

‘Il Gardellino’; adaptation of rv90; facs. in Vivaldiana 1 (2002)

D

429

VI,10

153

D-SWl, I-Tn

With vn solo in 2nd movt; incl. in Breitkopf catalogue

D

783

VI,17

N

D-SWl

Incl. in Esterházy music catalogue

d

431a

--

CE

GB-En

‘Il Gran Mogol’; inc. (source lacks vn 2 pt); revised and transposed as rv431

e

431

Op. Inc., CE

I-Tn

Inc. (2nd movt not transmitted in source); Op. Inc. publ. before discovery of rv431a

e

432

Op. Inc., CE

Tn

Inc. (only 1st movt transmitted in source)

F

433

VI,12

454

op.10 no.1

‘La Tempesta di Mare’; adapted from rv98/570; facs. in Vivaldiana 1 (2002)

F

434

op.10 no.5, S-L

Adapted from rv442 with 2nd movt transposed; facs. in Vivaldiana 1 (2002)

G

435

VI,15

457

op.10 no.4

Facs. in Vivaldiana 1 (2002)

G

436

VI,8

151

D-Bds, I-Tn, S-Skma

Sources differ on scoring of 2nd movt; incl. in Breitkopf catalogue

G

437

VI,16

458

op.10 no.6

Adaptation of rv101; facs. in Vivaldiana 1 (2002)

G

438

VI,6

138

I-Tn

Adaptation of rv414

G

438a

--

--

I-Tn

2nd version contained in source materials for rv438, incl. bn added to bass pt of 2nd movt

g

439

VI,13

455

op.10 no.2

‘La Notte’; adaptation of rv104; facs. in Vivaldiana 1 (2002)

a

440

VI,7

148

Tn

Source also contains simplified version of solo pt

Lost, uncertain, doubtful, spurious

D

Anh.109

S-Skma

Probably spurious (formerly rv426)

G

784

Lost; incl. in Esterházy music catalogue

G

805

Lost; incl. in music catalogue of the Collegium Wilhelminum, Strasbourg

?

821

‘La Francia’; lost’; incl. in Selhof catalogue and Vivaldi’s letter of 5 May 1741 (see Grünsteudel, 2015)

?

822

‘L’Inghilterra; lost; incl. in Selhof catalogue and Vivaldi’s letter of 5 May 1741 (see Grünsteudel, 2015)

?

823

‘L’Olanda’; lost; mentioned in Vivaldi’s letter of 5 May 1741 (see Grünsteudel, 2015)

?

824

‘La Germania’; lost; mentioned in Vivaldi’s letter of 5 May 1741 (see Grünsteudel, 2015)

?

825

‘La Spagna’; lost; incl. in Selhof catalogue and Vivaldi’s letter of 5 May 1741 (see Grünsteudel, 2015)

?

826

‘L’Italia’; lost; mentioned in Vivaldi’s letter of 5 May 1741 (see Grünsteudel, 2015)

For additional doubtful and spurious works, see rv Anh.64

View large

For recorder

View large

Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE)

Principal sources

Remarks

c

441

VI,11

159

I-Tn

‘Flauto’; for alto rec

F

442

VI,1

46

Tn

‘Flauto’; for alto rec; adapted as rv434; facs. in Vivaldiana 1 (2002)

C/G

443

VI,4

105

Tn

‘Flautino’; for ?sop/descant rec; score written in C (given in M) with directions for transposition in G

C

444

VI,5

110

Tn

‘Flautino’; for sopranino rec

a/e

445

VI,9

152

Tn

‘Flautino’; for ?sop/descant rec; score written in A minor (given in M) with directions for transposition in E minor

View large

For oboe

View large

Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE)

Principal sources

Remarks

C

446

VII,20

S-L

C

447

VII,6

216

I-Tn

Related to rv447 and rv470, with diff. 3rd movt

C

448

VII,7

217

Tn

Adaptation of rv470

C

449

op.8 no.12

?Adapted for vn as rv178 (printed editions give both options for solo instrument); incl. in Sonsfeld catalogue; movts 1 and 2 adapted by N. Chédeville in Le Printems ou les Saisons amusantes (Paris, 1739), no.2

C

450

VII,11

283

Tn

Adaptation of rv471

C

451

VII,4

222

Tn

C

452

VII,17

520

S-Uu

D

453

VII,10

279

I-Tn

d

454

VII,1

2

op.8 no.9

Adapted for vn as rv236 (printed editions give both options for solo instrument); movts 1 and 2 adapted by N. Chédeville in Le Printems ou les Saisons amusantes (Paris, 1739), no.6

F

455

VII,2

14

D-HRD, I-Tn

Incl. in Sonsfeld catalogue

F

456

VII,16

488

Harmonia mundi (London, 1728), no.5

Authenticity previously questioned, now considered genuine (formerly rv Anh.110)

F

457

VII,12

315

Tn

Adaptation of rv485

g

460

op.11 no.6

?Earlier version of rv334

a

461

VII,5

215

I-Tn

a

462

VII,19

N

S-L, Uu

a

463

VII,13

316

I-Tn

Adaptation of rv500

Lost, uncertain, doubtful, spurious

F

Anh.152

VII,18

S-L

Probably spurious (formerly rv458)

g

Anh.111

D-WD

Inc.(source transmits only 2 movts); spurious (formerly rv459)

B♭

Anh.141

VII,15

448

op.7/ii no.1

Probably spurious (formerly rv464)

B♭

Anh.142

VII,14

442

op.7/i no.1

Probably spurious (formerly rv465)

For additional uncertain, doubtful, and spurious works, see rv Anh.16 (A. Marcello) and 17 (G.P. Telemann)

View large

For bassoon

View large

Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE, Op. Inc.)

Principal sources

Remarks

C

466

VIII,28

274

I-Tn

C

467

VIII,18

239

Tn

C

468

Op. Inc., CE

Tn

Inc. (source transmits 1st and 2nd movts only)

C

469

VIII,16

237

Tn

C

470

VIII,33

281

Tn

Related to rv447 (with different 3rd movt); basis for rv448

C

471

VIII,34

282

Tn

Basis for rv450

C

472

VIII,17

238

Tn

C

473

VIII,9

118

Tn

C

474

VIII,4

47

Tn

C

475

VIII,21

267

Tn

C

476

VIII,31

277

Tn

C

477

VIII,13

224

Tn

C

478

VIII,3

34

Tn

C

479

VIII,26

272

Tn

c

480

VIII,14

225

Tn

d

481

VIII,5

67

Tn

1st movt, with alterations, for vc in rv406 (1st movt)

d

482

Op. Inc., CE

Tn

Inc. (source transmits 1 movt only)

E♭

483

VIII,27

273

Tn

e

484

VIII,6

71

Tn

F

485

VIII,8

109

Tn

Basis for rv457

F

486

VIII,22

268

Tn

F

487

VIII,15

236

Tn

F

488

VIII,19

240

Tn

With 2 solo vn in 1st movt

F

489

VIII,20

266

Tn

F

490

VIII,32

278

Tn

F

491

VIII,25

271

Tn

G

492

VIII,29

275

Tn

G

493

VIII,30

276

Tn

G

494

VIII,37

300

Tn

g

495

VIII,23

269

Tn

g

496

VIII,11

214

Tn

a

497

VIII,7

72

Tn

a

498

VIII,2

28

Tn

a

499

VIII,12

223

Tn

a

500

VIII,10

119

Tn

Basis for rv463

B♭

501

VIII,1

12

Tn

‘La Notte’

B♭

502

VIII,24

270

Tn

B♭

503

VIII,35

298

Tn

B♭

504

VIII,36

299

Tn

View large

Double concertos

with strings and continuo

Sources:

L’estro armonico (2 bks), op.3 (Amsterdam, 1711); different order of contents in English ed. (London, 1714 or 1715 [Pt 1] and 1717 [Pt 2]) [numbering taken from Amsterdam ed.]

La cetra (2 bks), op.9 (Amsterdam, 1727)

For 2 violins

View large

Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE)

Principal sources

Remarks

C

505

I,85

181

I-Tn

C

506

I,157

342

D-Dl

C

507

I,43

112

Dl, I-Tn

Dresden source has locally added pts for 2 ob

C

508

I,44

116

D-Dl, I-Tn

Dresden source has locally added pts for 2 ob, bn

c

509

I,12

48

Tn

c

510

I,14

60

GB-Lam, I-Tn

Also for vn, org as rv766

D

511

I,35

89

Tn

D

512

I,41

108

Tn

513

I,222

486

VI concerti a 5 stromenti (Amsterdam, 1736), no.6

Item 7 in Vivaldi’s autograph incipit catalogue; incl. in Esterházy music catalogue

d

514

I,100

209

Tn

E♭

515

I,101

210

Tn

F

765

I,241

N

GB-Lam

For vn, org as rv767

G

516

I,6

27

I-Tn

2nd movt in rv71, along with material from outer movts

g

517

I,98

207

Tn

A

519

I,175

410, CE

op.3 no.5

Also transmitted in numerous copies and adaptations; incl. in multiple catalogues

A

520

A-Wn

Inc. (lacks vn 1 solo pt)

A

521

I,159

344

D-Dl

Dresden source has locally added pts for 2 ob, bn

A

552

I,139

319

D-Dl

vn, ‘echo’ vn; facs. in Due concerti autografi della Sächsische Landesbibliothek di Dresda (Siena, 1950), Musik der Dresdener Hofkapelle (Leipzig, 1977), and Vivaldiana 5 (2007); with two ?solo vn as accompaniment to the ‘echo’ vn

a

522

I,177

413, CE

op.3 no.8

Basis for bwv593; see also rv522a

a

523

I,61

140

F-Pc, I-Tn

B♭

524

I,40

107

Tn

B♭

525

I,63

145

Tn

B♭

526

A-Wn

Inc. (lacks vn 1 solo pt)

B♭

527

I,99

208

I-Tn

B♭

529

I,42

111

Tn

B♭

530

I,57

132

op.9 no.9

B♭

764

GB-Mp

For vn, ob as rv548; 2nd movt in rv107, 2nd movt

Lost, uncertain, doubtful, spurious

a

522a

vc solo in 3rd movt; publ. by G. Schirmer (NY, 1909); ?based on lost exemplar of unknown provenance; combination of 1st and 2nd movts of rv522 with finale of rv813

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For 2 other similar instruments

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Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE)

Principal sources

Remarks

g

531

III,2

61

I-Tn

2 vc

G

532

V,2

104

Tn

2 mand

C

533

VI,2

101

FZc, Tn

2 fl

C

534

VII,3

139

Tn

2 ob

D

781

XII,50

510

A-Wn

2 ob; solo vn in 2nd movt (formerly rv563)

d

535

VII,9

264

I-Tn

2 ob

a

536

VII,8

263

Tn

2 ob

C

537

IX,1

97

Tn

2 tpt; 2nd movt in rv110

F

538

X,1

91

Tn

2 hn; vc solo in 2nd movt

F

539

X,2

121

Tn

2 hn

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For 2 diverse instruments

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Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE)

Principal sources

Remarks

C

774

I-Vc

vn, org; inc. (only vn solo pt survives, also transmitting bass pt for 2nd movt)

C

808

I-Vc

vn, org; inc. (only vn solo pt survives, also transmitting bass pt for 2nd movt); formerly rv Anh.76

c

766

GB-Lam

vn, org; for 2 vn as rv510

d

540

XII,38

320

D-Dl

va d’amore, lute; facs. in Musik der Dresdener Hofkapelle (Leipzig, 1977) and Vivaldiana 5 (2007)

d

541

XII,19

95

I-Tn

vn, org

F

542

XII,41

353

D-Dl

vn, org; Item 4 in Vivaldi’s autograph incipit catalogue

F

543

XII,35

265

I-Tn

vn, unison ob; ?adaptation of rv139 with revisions

F

544

IV,5

135

Tn

vn, vc; ‘Il Mondo al rovescio’; adapted (with emended title) as rv572

F

767

GB-Lam

vn, org, for 2 vn as rv765

F

775

I-Vc

vn, org; inc. (only vn solo pt survives, also transmitting bass pt for 2nd movt); 1st movt in rv284 and 285

G

545

XII,36

280

Tn

ob, bn

G

814

Vc

vn, vc; inc. (only va pt survives); certainly authentic [formerly rv Anh.87; erroneously listed in Ryom 1986 as rv Anh.91]

g

812

A-RO

vn/ob, vc

A

546

IV,6

146

Tn

vn, vc all’inglese; putative alternative scoring for kbd solo with strings and continuo (formerly rv780) based on misinterpretation of annotations in source

B♭

547

IV,2

35

D-WD, I-Tn

vn, vc

B♭

548

XII,16

73

Tn

vn, ob; for 2 vn as rv764; 2nd movt in rv107, 2nd movt

For uncertain, doubtful, and spurious works, rv Anh.17 (G.P. Telemann), and rv Anh.18

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Concertos for 3 or more soloists

with strings and continuo

Source: L’estro armonico (2 bks), op.3 (Amsterdam, 1711); different order of contents in English ed. (London, 1714 or 1715 [Pt 1] and 1717 [Pt 2]) [numbering taken from Amsterdam ed.]

View large

Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE, Op. Inc.)

Principal sources

Remarks

D

549

IV,7

406, CE

op.3 no.1

4 vn; vc solo in 1st movt; frag. of vc pt in F-Psg

e

550

I,174

409, CE

op.3 no.4

4 vn

F

551

I,34

88

D-Dl, I-Tn

3 vn

B♭

553

I,59

134

I-Tn

4 vn

C

554

XII,34

250

Tn

vn, org/vn, ob

C

554a

Tn

vn, org/vn, vc; version of rv554 with new instrumentation

C

555

XII,23

142

Tn

3 vn, 2 viole all’inglese [= viols], 2 vc, 2 rec, ob, 2 chalumeaux, 2 hpd; (2 vn ‘in tromba marina’ in 3rd movt); facs. in Vivaldiana 4 (2007)

C

556

XII,14

54

Tn

2 vn, 2 rec, 2 ob, 2 cl, bn, (bc incl lute); ‘Concerto per la solennità di S Lorenzo’; M combines this version of outer movts with 2nd movt instrumentation of version rv556a

C

556a

Tn (same source as rv556)

Version without 2 cl

C

557

XII,17

90

Tn

2 vn, 2 ob (2 rec, bn in 2nd movt)

C

558

XII,37

318

D-Dl

2 vn ‘in tromba marina’, 2 rec, 2 mand, 2 chalumeaux, 2 theorbos, vc; facs. of Dresden source in Due concerti autografi della Sächsische Landesbibliothek di Dresda (Siena, 1950), Musik der Dresdener Hofkapelle (Leipzig, 1977), and Vivaldiana 5 (2007); isolated pts (including [?posthumously] created pts for 2 hn to replace 2 vn ‘in tromba marina’) preserved in I-Vc

C

559

XII,2

10

Tn

2 ob, 2 cl

C

560

XII,1

3

Tn

2 ob, 2 cl

C

561

IV,3

53

Tn

vn, 2 vc

D

562

XII,47

380

D-Dl

vn, 2 ob, 2 hn, timp; ‘Concerto per la solennità di S Lorenzo’; inc. (lacks vn 1 and one or more bass pts); frag. of vn 2 pt also preserved in I-Tn; M omits timp and includes pts for 2 org

D

562a

NL-Au

vn, 2 ob, 2 hn, timp; different 2nd movt

D

564

IV,4

99

I-Tn

2 vn, 2 vc

D

564a

D-Dl

2 vn, 2 ob, bn (authorship of this scoring uncertain)

d

565

IV,11

416, CE

op.3 no.11

2 vn, vc; basis for bwv596; frag. of vc pt in F-Psg

d

566

XII,31

213

I-Tn

2 vn, 2 rec, 2 ob, bn

F

567

IV,9

412, CE

op.3 no.7, D-Dl, I-Nc, N-T

4 vn, vc; kbd arr. in Anne Dawson’s Book (GB-Mp); Dresden source transmits earlier version

F

568

XII,39

338

D-Dl

vn, 2 ob, 2 hn, bn; one of the two Dresden sources transmits a pasticcio version with 2nd movt from rv202 and numerous local alterations

F

569

XII,10

43

Dl, I-Tn

vn, 2 ob, 2 hn, bn (vc solo in 3rd movt); Dresden source contains numerous (local?) alterations

F

570

XII,28

150

Tn

fl, ob, bn (vn solo in 1st movt); ‘Tempesta di mare’; inc. (several bars lost when MS trimmed); alternative version of rv98; adapted as rv433 with revisions; facs. in Vivaldiani 1 (2002)

F

571

XII,40

350

D-Dl

vn, 2 ob, 2 hn, bn (vc solo in 1st movt); ?adapted from (or basis for) rv99

F

572

GB-Lbl, Mp

vn, vc, 2 fl, 2 ob, hpd; ‘Il Proteo, ò sia Il Mondo al rovescio’ adapted from rv544; CE (forthcoming)

F

574

XII,18

94

D-Dl, I-Tn

’per S.A.S.I.S.P.G.M.D.G.S.M.B.’; vn, 2 ob, bn, 2 ‘Trombon da caccia’ (= hn), [vc solo in 3rd movt]

G

575

IV,1

26, Op. Inc.; CE

Tn

2 vn, 2 vc (inc.; score missing one folio in 1st movt)

g

576

XII,33

249

D-Dl, I-Tn

vn, ob, 2 rec, 2 ob, bn, dbn; first printing of M erroneously identified rec as hn

g

577

XII,3

25

Tn

vn, 2 rec, 2 ob, bn; ‘per l’Orchestra di Dresda’; 1 addl vn solo in 1st and 3rd movt

g

578

IV,8

407, CE

op.3 no.2, D-Dl

2 vn, vc

g

578a

--

CE

D-Dl

Earlier version of rv578 with many significant differences

B♭

579

XII,12

51

I-Tn

vn, ob, chalumeau, 3 viole all’inglese [= viols]; ‘Concerto funebre’; facs. (Siena, 1947), and in Vivaldiana 4 (2007); 1st movt in rv738; 4th movt in rv123, 3rd movt

b

580

IV,10

415, CE

op.3 no.10, D-Bds

4 vn, vc; also formerly in D-Dl; basis for bwv1065; 2nd movt arr. for 3 kbd in D-Bds

Lost, uncertain, doubtful, spurious

F

573

2 ob, 2 hn, 2 bn; lost (formerly D-DS)

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Concertos with 2 orchestras

solo instruments with strings in two ‘cori’ and continuo

View large

Key

rv

F

Edition

(M, CE, Op. Inc.)

Principal sources

Remarks

C

581

I,13

55

I-Tn, Vc

vn; ‘Per la SS Assontione di Maria Vergine’; related to rv179 and 179a

D

582

I,62

141

D-Dl, I-Tn, Vc

vn; ‘Per la SS Assontione di Maria Vergine’; 2nd movt in rv12 (as 1st movt); Dresden source includes ?local variants

B♭

583

I,60

136

Tn

vn (scordatura)

C

793

I-Vc

2 org; inc. (only vn 1 pt from Coro I survives)

F

584

Op. Inc., CE

Tn

vn, org (Coro 1); vn, org (Coro 2); ?inc. (only the 1st movt survives)

A

585

XII,48

381

D-Dl

Coro 1 = 2 vn, 2 rec; Coro 2 = 2 vn, 2 rec, org; facs. in Quattro concerti autografi della Sächsische Landesbibliothek di Dresda (Siena, 1949)

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Bibliography

A. Specialist periodicals and collections
  • Antonio Vivaldi: Note e documenti sulla vita e sulle opere, Chigiana, vol.1 (1939)
  • La scuola veneziana (secoli XVI–XVIII): Note e documenti, Chigiana, vol.3 (1941)
  • Vivaldiana, 1 (Brussels, 1969) [only one issue pubd]
  • Vivaldi informations (Copenhagen, 1971–3)
  • Antonio Vivaldi da Venezia all’Europa, ed. F. Degrada and M.T. Muraro (Milan, 1978)
  • Vivaldi-Studien: Dresden 1978
  • Vivaldi veneziano europeo: Venice 1978
  • NRMI, vol.13/1 (1979) [Vivaldi issue]
  • Informazioni e studi vivaldiani: Bollettino annuale dell’Istituto Italiano Antonio Vivaldi (1980–2000) [ISV]
  • Opera & Vivaldi: Dallas 1980
  • Antonio Vivaldi: Venice 1981
  • Nuovi studi vivaldiani: Venice 1987
  • La prima ‘Settimana musicale senese’ e la Vivaldi Renaissance (1939–1989): Siena 1989 [Chigiana, new ser., vol.21 (1989)]
  • Vivaldi: vero e falso: problemi di attribuzione: Poitiers 1991
  • Cinquant’anni di produzione e consumi della musica dell’età di Vivaldi: Venice 1997
  • Studi vivaldiani (2001–) [SV]
  • Vivaldi, ‘Motezuma’ and the Opera Seria: Essays on a Newly Discovered Work and its Background, ed. M. Talbot (Turnhout, 2008)
  • Antonio Vivaldi: passato e futuro: Venice 2007, ed. F. Fanna and M. Talbot (2009) [online publication]
  • Vivaldi, ed. M. Talbot (Farnham, 2011) [facs. reproduction of previously published articles]
  • Fulgeat sol frontis decorae: studi in onore di Michael Talbot, Saggi vivaldiani, 1, ed. A. Borin and J. Cameron (Venice, 2016)
B. General documentation, catalogues of works
  • BrookB
  • A. Fuchs: Thematisches Verzeichniss über die Compositionen von Antonio Vivaldi (MS, D-B, 1839); facs. with commentary ed. P. Ryom in Vivaldi informations, vol.1 (1971–2), 43–71
  • W. Altmann: ‘Thematischer Katalog der gedruckten Werke Antonio Vivaldis’, AMw, vol.4 (1922), 262–79
  • M. Rinaldi: Catalogo numerico tematico delle composizioni di Antonio Vivaldi (Rome, 1945)
  • M. Pincherle: Antonio Vivaldi et la musique instrumentale, 2 (Paris, 1948/R)
  • A. Fanna: A. Vivaldi: Catalogo numerico-tematico delle opere strumentali (Milan, 1968); rev. 2/1986 as Opere strumentali di Antonio Vivaldi (1678–1741): Catalogo numerico-tematico secondo la catalogazione Fanna [catalogue of the Ricordi edition]
  • P. Ryom: ‘Le recensement des cantates d’Antonio Vivaldi’, DAM, vol.6 (1968–72), 81–100
  • P. Ryom: ‘Àpropos de l’inventaire des œuvres d’Antonio Vivaldi: étude critique des catalogues et nouvelles découvertes (48 manuscrits inconnus)’, Vivaldiana, vol.1 (1969), 69–114
  • P. Ryom: ‘Nouvelles découvertes, 1–4’, Vivaldi informations, vol.1 (1971–2), 14–16, 30–35, 87–90; vol.2 (1973), 106–7
  • P. Ryom: ‘Le premier catalogue thématique des œuvres d’Antonio Vivaldi’, Festskrift Jens Peter Larsen, ed. N. Schiørring, H. Glahn, and C.E. Hatting (Copenhagen, 1972), 127–40
  • P. Ryom: Antonio Vivaldi: Table de concordances des œuvres (Copenhagen, 1973)
  • P. Ryom: Verzeichnis der Werke Antonio Vivaldis: Kleine Ausgabe (Leipzig, 1974, 2/1979)
  • P. Ryom: Les manuscrits de Vivaldi (Copenhagen, 1977)
  • E. Garbero: ‘Drammaturgia vivaldiana: Regesto e concordanze dei libretti’, Antonio Vivaldi da Venezia all’Europa, ed. F. Degrada and M.T. Muraro (Milan, 1978), 111–53
  • A. Girard and G. Rostirolla: ‘Catalogo delle composizioni di Antonio Vivaldi’, NRMI, vol.13 (1979), 210–89
  • W. Kolneder: Antonio Vivaldi: Dokumente seines Lebens und Schaffens (Wilhelmshaven, 1979)
  • A.L. Bellina, B. Brizi, and M.G. Pensa: I libretti vivaldiani: Recensione e collazione dei testimoni a stampa (Florence, 1982)
  • P. Ryom: Répertoire des œuvres d’Antonio Vivaldi: les compositions instrumentales (Copenhagen, 1986)
  • K. Heller: Antonio Vivaldi: Kalendarium zur Lebens- und Werkgeschichte, Studien zur Aufführungspraxis und Interpretation der Musik des 18. Jahrhunderts, 33 (Michaelstein-Blankenburg, 1987)
  • M. Talbot: Antonio Vivaldi: a Guide to Research (New York, 1988), 1–108 [comprehensive bibliography]
  • P. Ryom: ‘rv749’, ISV, vol.14 (1993), 5–50 [lists operatic arias preserved separately]
  • P. Ryom: ‘Les doubles dans les partitions d’opéra de Vivaldi’, ISV, vol.15 (1994), 5–50
  • P. Ryom: ‘La “Grosse Ausgabe” et “Ercole sul Termodonte”: Problèmes concernant le catalogage d’un opéra perdu’, SV, vol.3 (2003), 89–102
  • P. Ryom: Antonio Vivaldi: Thematisch-systematisches Verzeichnis seiner Werke (Wiesbaden, 2007); 2nd ed., rev. F.M. Sardelli (Wiesbaden, 2017) [RV]
  • E. Selfridge-Field: A New Chronology of Venetian Opera and Related Genres, 1660–1760 (Stanford, 2007)
  • F.M. Sardelli: ‘Aggiornamenti del catalogo vivaldiano’, SV (2007–12, 2014–15)
  • M. Talbot: The Vivaldi Compendium (Woodbridge, 2011)
C. Studies and inventories of manuscript and printed collections
  • A. Gentili: ‘La raccolta di rarità musicali “Mauro Foà” alla Biblioteca Nazionale di Torino’, Accademie e biblioteche d’Italia, vol.1 (1927–8), 3–50; repr. as ‘La raccolta “Mauro Foà” nella Biblioteca Nazionale de Torino’, RMI, vol.34 (1927), 356–68
  • A. Gentili: ‘La raccolta di antiche musiche “Renzo Giordano” alla Biblioteca Nazionale di Torino’, Accademie e biblioteche d’Italia, vol.4 (1930–31), 117–25
  • H.R. Jung: ‘Die Dresdner Vivaldi-Manuskripte’, AMw, vol.12 (1955), 314–18
  • G. Gentili Verona: ‘Le collezioni Foà e Giordano della Biblioteca Nazionale di Torino’, Accademie e biblioteche d’Italia, vol.32 (1964), 405–30; repr. with Eng. summary in Vivaldiana, vol.1 (1969), 31–56
  • P. Damilano: ‘Inventario delle composizioni musicale manoscritte di Antonio Vivaldi esistenti presso la Biblioteca Nazionale di Torino’, RIM, vol.3 (1968), 109–79
  • J.-P. Demoulin: ‘Indice thématique “pro memoria” conservé dans la collection Foà de Turin’, Vivaldiana, vol.1 (1969), 147–50
  • R. Eller: ‘Über Charakter und Geschichte der Dresdner Vivaldi-Manuskripte’, Vivaldiana, vol.1 (1969), 57–67
  • K. Heller: Die deutsche Überlieferung der Instrumentalwerke Vivaldis (Leipzig, 1971)
  • P. Ryom: ‘Inventaire de la documentation manuscrite des œuvres de Vivaldi: I. Biblioteca Nazionale di Torino (première partie: le fonds Foà)’, Vivaldi informations, vol.2 (1973), 61–100
  • F. Fano: ‘Una traccia prossima alla prima origine della raccolta di musiche vivaldiane conservata alla Biblioteca Nazionale di Torino’, Medioevo e umanesimo, vol.24 (1976), 83–93
  • O. Landmann: ‘Katalog der Dresdener Vivaldi-Handschriften und -Frühdrucke’, Vivaldi-Studien: Dresden 1978, 101–67
  • P. Everett: ‘A Roman Concerto Repertory: Ottoboni’s “What Not”?’, PRMA, vol.110 (1983–4), 62–78
  • P. Everett: ‘Vivaldi Concerto Manuscripts in Manchester’, ISV, vol.5 (1984), 23–52; vol.6 (1985), 23–52; vol.7 (1986), 5–34
  • M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi in the Sale Catalogue of Nicolaas Selhof’, ISV, vol.6 (1985), 57–63
  • I. Fragalà Data and A. Colturato: Biblioteca nazionale universitaria di Torino, i. Raccolta Mauro Foà, roccolta Renzo Giordano (Rome, 1987)
  • M. Fechner: ‘Bemerkungen zu einigen Dresdner Vivaldi-Manuskripten’, Nuovi studi vivaldiani: Venice 1987, 775–84
  • A. Basso: ‘I codici vivaldiani di Torino, ovvero fatti e misfatti, avventure e disavventure del collezionismo musicale’, La prima ‘Settimana musicale senese’ e la Vivaldi Renaissance (1939–1989): Siena 1989 [Chigiana, new ser., vol.21 (1989)], 161–84
  • P. Everett: The Manchester Concerto Partbooks (New York, 1989)
  • P. Everett: ‘Vivaldi’s Italian Copyists’, ISV, vol.11 (1990), 27–87
  • L. Pancino: ‘Le caratteristiche grafiche della mano di Vivaldi secondo il metodo grafologico’, ISV, vol.13 (1992), 67–95
  • R. Rasch: ‘La famosa mano di Monsieur Roger: Antonio Vivaldi and his Dutch Publishers’, ISV, vol.17 (1996), 89–137
  • F.M. Sardelli: ‘Vivaldi a Ulm negli acquisti di Johann Kleinknecht’, SV, vol.2 (2002), 99–105
  • M. Cornaz: ‘Inventaire complet du fonds musical des archives privées de la famille d’Arenberg à Enghien’, Revue Belge de Musicologie/Belgisch Tijdschrift voor Muziekwetenshap, vol.58 (2004), 81–202
  • L. Kačic: ‘Vivaldiana in der Sammlung italienischer Konzerte der Piaristen in Podolínec’, SV, vol.6 (2006), 17–38
  • M. Beghelli: ‘Che cosa ci dicono le “travature” vivaldiane?’, Antonio Vivaldi: Passato e futuro: Venice 2007, 339–52
  • C. Pancino: ‘Le musiche per le Putte della Pietà: riordino dei manoscritti musicali del “Fondo Correr”’, Antonio Vivaldi: Passato e futuro (Venice, 2009), 529–33
  • H. Seifert: ‘Vivaldi in the “Este” Music Collection of the Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, Vienna’, Antonio Vivaldi: Passato e futuro (Venice, 2009), 179–91
  • K. Heller: ‘Pisendels Sammlung Vivaldischer Violinkonzerte’, Johann Georg Pisendel: Studien zu Leben und Werk: Dresden 2005, ed. O. Landmann and H.-G. Ottenberg (Hildesheim, 2010), 145–69
  • M. Talbot: ‘The Concerto Collection “Roger No.188”: its Origin, Nature and Content’, SV, vol.12 (2012), 3–35
  • P. Everett: ‘Vivaldi’s Bohemian Manuscripts’, Journal of the Society for Musicology in Ireland, vol.8 (2012–13), 41–50
  • J. Ágústsson: ‘The Secular Vocal Collection of Jan Dismas Zelenka: A Reconstruction’, SV, vol.13 (2013), 3–51
D. Sources – studies of individual manuscripts
  • P.P. Domokos: ‘Két Vivaldi-emlék’ [Two Vivaldi fragments], Magyar zene, vol.3 (1962), 156–7 [concerns rv791]
  • J.-P. Demoulin: ‘Un “Salve Regina” inconnu pour soprano, violon solo, orchestre à cordes et orgue’, Vivaldiana, vol.1 (1969), 143–6 [concerns rv617]
  • R. Strohm: ‘Eine neuentdeckte Mantuaner Opernpartitur Vivaldis’, Vivaldi informations, vol.2 (1973), 104–6 [concerns rv736]
  • M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi’s “Manchester” Sonatas’, PRMA, vol.104 (1977–8), 20–29
  • M. Fechner: ‘Neue Vivaldi-Funde in der Sächisischen Landesbibliothek Dresden’, Vivaldi-Studien: Dresden 1978, 42–58, 174–5
  • M. Talbot: ‘A Vivaldi Discovery at the Conservatorio “Benedetto Marcello”’, ISV, vol.3 (1982), 3–12
  • M. Grattoni: ‘Una scoperta vivaldiana a Cividale del Friuli’, ISV, vol.4 (1983), 3–19 [concerns rv208]
  • M. Grattoni: ‘Nuove fonti vivaldiane a Udine e a Cividale del Friuli’, ISV, vol.5 (1984), 3–22 [concerns rv7a, 208, 519, 757, and 785]
  • F.S. Tanenbaum: ‘The Pietà Partbooks and More Vivaldi’, ISV, vol.8 (1987), 7–12
  • F.S. Tanenbaum: ‘The Pietà Partbooks: Continued’, ISV, vol.9 (1988), 5–13
  • M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi in the Sale Room: a New Version of “Leon Feroce”’, ISV, vol.12 (1991), 5–17
  • B. Over: ‘Ein unbekanntes Vivaldi-Autograph im Conservatorio “Benedetto Marcello”’, ISV, vol.13 (1992), 5–16
  • P. Everett: ‘Vivaldi at Work: the Autograph of the “Gloria” rv 589’, ISV, vol.17 (1996), 68–86
  • M. Talbot: ‘A New Vivaldi Violin Sonata and Other Recent Finds’, ISV, vol.20 (1999), 111–31
  • O. Fourés and M. Talbot: ‘A New Vivaldi Cantata in Vienna’, ISV, vol.21 (2000), 99–108
  • F. Tanenbaum Tiedge and M. Talbot: ‘The Berkeley Castle Manuscript: Arias and Cantatas by Vivaldi and his Italian Contemporaries’, SV, vol.3 (2003), 33–86
  • P. Ryom: ‘Les insertions dans la partition de “La verità di cimento”’, SV, vol.4 (2004), 25–40
  • M. Talbot: ‘Anna Maria’s Partbook’, Musik an den venezianischen Ospedali/Konservatorien vom 17. bis zum frühen 19. Jahrhundert, ed. H. Geyer and W. Osthoff (Rome, 2004), 23–79
  • M. Talbot: ‘Recovering Vivaldi’s Lost Psalm’, Eighteenth-Century Music, vol.1 (2004), 1–17
  • S. Voss: ‘Die Partitur von Vivaldis Oper ‘Motezuma’ (1733)’, SV, vol.4 (2004), 53–72
  • J. Stockigt and M. Talbot: ‘Two More New Vivaldi Finds in Dresden’, Eighteenth-Century Music, vol.3 (2006), 35–61
  • M. Talbot: ‘“Full of Graces”: Anna Maria Receives Ornaments from the Hands of Antonio Vivaldi’, Arcangelo Corelli fra mito e realtà storica: Nuove prospettive d’indagine musicale e interdisciplinare nel 350e anniversario della nascita, ed. G. Barnett, A. D’Ovidio, and S. La Via (Florence, 2007), 253–66
  • R. Hugo: ‘Entdeckung oder Wiederentdeckung? Eine unbekannte Abschrift des “Magnificats” von A. Vivaldi’, SV, vol.8 (2008), 87–91
  • N. Lockey: ‘Second Thoughts, Embellishments, and an Orphaned Fragment: Vivaldi’s and Pisendel’s Contributions to the Dresden Score of rv340’, SV, vol.10 (2010), 125–41
  • A. Woolley: ‘An Unknown Flute Concerto by Vivaldi in Scotland’, SV, vol.10 (2010), 3–37 [concerns rv431a]
  • Fulgeat sol frontis decorae: Studi in onore di Michael Talbot, Saggi vivaldiani, 1, ed. A. Borin and J. Cameron (Venice, 2016) [incl. F.M. Sardelli: ‘Vivaldi prima di Vivaldi. La nuova Sonata rv820’, 189–205; J.B. Stockigt: ‘Discoveries and Recoveries of Vivaldi and Zelenka Sources in the Sächsische Landesbibliothek – Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek, Dresden’, 223–33]
  • J. Lupiáñiez and F. Ammetto: ‘Una nuova Cadenza vivaldiana in un Concerto per Violino animino’, SV, vol.17 (2017), 79–102
  • M. Talbot: ‘Another Vivaldi Work Falsely Attributed to Galuppi by Iseppo Baldan: a New Laetatus sum for Choir and Strings in Dresden’, SV, vol.17 (2017), 103–119
E. Sources – letters and printed dedications
  • F. Stefani, ed.: Sei lettere di Antonio Vivaldi maestro compositore della prima metà del secolo XVIII (Venice, 1871)
  • O. Rudge, ed.: Lettere e dediche di Antonio Vivaldi, Quaderni dell’Accademia chigiana, i (Siena, 1942)
  • A. Cavicchi: ‘Inediti nell’epistolario Vivaldi–Bentivoglio’, NRMI, vol.1 (1967), 45–79
  • R. Antonetto: Un documento della civiltà piemontese del Settecento: il castello di Guarene (Turin, 1979), 139
  • G. Corti: ‘Il Teatro della Pergola di Firenze e la stagione d’opera per il carnevale 1726–1727: Lettere di Luca Casimiro degli Albizzi a Vivaldi, Porpora e altri’, RIM, vol.15 (1980), 182–8
  • C. Vitali: ‘Una lettera vivaldiana perduta e ritrovata, un inedito monteverdiano del 1630 e altri carteggi di musicisti celebri, ovvero splendori e nefandezze del collezionismo di autografi’, NRMI, vol.14 (1980), 404–12
  • F. Degrada: ‘Le lettere di Antonio Vivaldi pubblicate da Federico Stefani: Un caso di “revisione” ottocentesca’, ISV, vol.5 (1984), 83–9
  • R. Eller: ‘Vier Briefe Antonio Vivaldis’, ISV, vol.18 (1989), 5–23
  • G.A. Sechi: ‘Nuove scoperte dal carteggio tra Albizzi e Vivaldi (1735/1736)’, SV, vol.12 (2012), 53–88
  • M. White: Antonio Vivaldi: a Life in Documents, Quaderni vivaldiani, 17 (Florence, 2013)
  • G. Grünsteudel: ‘“Vienna 5 Maggio 1741”: Ein unbekannter Brief Antonio Vivaldis an Graf Johann Friedrich zu Oettingen-Wallerstein’, SV, vol.15 (2015), 5–10
F. Authenticity and chronology
  • K. Beckmann: ‘Zur Echtheitsfrage des Concerto rv275’, Vivaldi informations, vol.2 (1973), 7–16
  • R. Wiesend: ‘Die Arie “Già si sa ch’un empio sei”: Von Vivaldi oder von Galuppi?’, ISV, vol.4 (1983), 76–81
  • C. Timms: ‘“Prendea con man di latte”: a Vivaldi Spuriosity?’, ISV, vol.6 (1985), 64–73 [concerns rv753]
  • P. Everett: ‘Towards a Chronology of Vivaldi Manuscripts’, ISV, vol.8 (1987), 90–107
  • Nuovi studi vivaldiani: Venice 1987 [incl. P. Everett: ‘Towards a Vivaldi Chronology’, 729–57; M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi’s Sacred Vocal Music: the Three Periods’, 759–69; E. Selfridge-Field: ‘Vivaldi and Marcello: Clues to Provenance and Chronology’, 785–800; L. Zoppelli: ‘Tempeste e stravaganze: fattori estetici e recettivi in margine alla datazione dei concerti “a programma”’, 801–10]
  • P. Everett: ‘Vivaldi’s Marginal Markings: Clues to Sets of Instrumental Works and their Chronology’, Musicology in Ireland, ed. G. Gillen and H. White (Dublin, 1990), 248–63
  • P. Lescat: ‘“Il Pastor Fido”, une œuvre de Nicolas Chédeville’, ISV, vol.11 (1990), 5–10; expanded in Vivaldi. Vero e falso: Problemi di attribuzione: Poitiers 1991, 109–26
  • Vivaldi: Vero e falso: Problemi di attribuzione: Poitiers 1991 [incl. P. Ryom: ‘Vivaldi ou Galuppi? Un cas de doute surprenant’, 25–41 [concerns rv795]; K. Heller: ‘Zu einigen Incerta im Werkbestand Vivaldis’, 43–58 [concerns rv51, 796, and Anh.71]; P.J. Everett: ‘Opening “Il sepolcro”: Ziani, Vivaldi, and a Question of Stylistic Authenticity’, 69–89; K. Vlaardingerbroek: ‘Vivaldi and Lotti: Two Unknown Borrowings in Vivaldi’s Music’, 91–108; M. Fechner: ‘Wer ist der Komponist der Sinfonia rv132?’, 149–54]
  • M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi’s “Quadro”? The Case of rv Anh.66 Reconsidered’, AnMc, vol.32 (2002), 9–32
  • K. Vlaardingerbroek: ‘The Violin Concerto rv355: a Cuckoo in Vivaldi’s Nest?’, SV, vol.4 (2004), 9–23
  • F.M. Sardelli: ‘Le opere giovanili di Antonio Vivaldi’, SV, vol.5 (2005), 45–78
  • N. Delius: ‘Andrea Zani, alias Vivaldi rv785’, SV, vol.6 (2006), 9–15
  • N. Delius: ‘Ammerkungen zu rv806 und zu rv759’, SV, vol.7 (2007), 111–113
  • P. Queipo de Llano: ‘Nuevas hipótesis cronológicas para rv51, rv53, rv355 y rv594’, Antonio Vivaldi: Passato e futuro: Venice 2007, 509–28
  • F.M. Sardelli: ‘Da rv Anh.76 a rv808: un nuova concerto di Vivaldi’, SV, vol.7 (2007), 115–120
  • F.M. Sardelli: ‘Dall’esterno all’interno: criteri di autenticità e catalogazione di nuove fonti vivaldiane’, SV, vol.8 (2008), 93–108
  • F.M. Sardelli: Catalogo delle concordanze musicali vivaldiane, Quaderni vivaldiani, 16 (Florence, 2012)
  • F.M. Sardelli: ‘La misteriosa mano di Franz Anton Horneck ossia, perché rv402, 416, e 420 non sono lavori giovanili’, SV, vol.16 (2016), 89–101
  • M. Talbot: ‘Migrations of a Cuckoo and Nightingale: Vivaldi’s Concerto rv335 and a Reconsideration of rv335a and rv Anh.14’, SV, vol.16 (2016), 53–86
G. Iconography
  • F. Vatielli: ‘Un ritratto di Antonio Vivaldi?’, RaM, vol.9 (1938), 224–7
  • M. Talbot: Antonio Vivaldi: a Guide to Research (New York, 1988), 149–53
  • F. Farges and M. Ducastel-Delacroix: ‘Au sujet du vrai visage de Vivaldi: essai iconographique’, Vivaldi: Vero e falso: Problemi di attribuzione, ed. A. Fanna and M. Talbot (Florence, 1992), 155–79
  • F.M. Sardelli: ‘Ciuffi rossi ed altri dettagli: per una riconsiderazione dell’iconografia vivaldiana’, ISV, vol.15 (1994), 103–13
  • J. Wende: ‘Ein Porträt Don Antonio Vivaldis?’, ISV, vol.15 (1994), 83–98
  • F.M. Sardelli: ‘Un nuovo ritratto di Antonio Vivaldi’, SV, vol.2 (2002), 107–13
H. Life and works – general studies
  • M. Abbado: Antonio Vivaldi, I maestri della musica, 29 (Turin, 1942)
  • M. Rinaldi: Antonio Vivaldi (Milan, 1943)
  • M. Pincherle: Antonio Vivaldi et la musique instrumentale (Paris, 1948/R)
  • M. Pincherle: Vivaldi (Paris, 1955; Eng. trans., 1958, as Vivaldi: Genius of the Baroque)
  • W. Kolneder: Antonio Vivaldi: neue Studien zur Biographie und zur Stilistik der Werke (diss., U. of Saarbrücken, 1956)
  • R. Giazotto: Vivaldi (Milan, 1965, 2/1973 as Antonio Vivaldi)
  • W. Kolneder: Antonio Vivaldi: Leben und Werk (Wiesbaden, 1965; Eng. trans., 1970)
  • R. de Candé: Vivaldi (Paris, 1967, 2/1994)
  • M. Talbot: Vivaldi (London, 1978, 3/1993)
  • M. Talbot: Vivaldi (London, 1979)
  • R. Wiesend: ‘Vivaldi e Galuppi: rapporti biografici e stilistici’, Antonio Vivaldi: Venice 1981, 233–55
  • K. Heller: Antonio Vivaldi (Leipzig, 1991; Eng. trans., 1997)
  • H.C.R. Landon: Vivaldi: Voice of the Baroque (London, 1993)
  • M. Talbot: Venetian Music in the Age of Antonio Vivaldi (Aldershot, 1999)
  • P. Queipo de Llano: El furor del Prete Rosso (Madrid, 2005)
  • P.G. Gillio: L’attività musicale negli ospedali di Venezia nel Settecento, Quaderni vivaldiani, 12 (Florence, 2006)
  • S. Mamy: Antonio Vivaldi (Paris, 2011)
I. Biography – general
  • E. Wright: Some Observations Made in Travelling through France, Italy &c. in the Years 1720, 1721, and 1722, i (London, 1730), 84
  • Commemoriali Gradenigo (MS, I-Vmc, c. 1750), ii, f.36r
  • J.A. Hiller: ‘Lebenslauf des ehemaligen königlich polnischen und churfürstlichen sächsischen Concertmeisters Herrn Johann Georg Pisendel’, Wöchentliche Nachrichten und Anmerkungen die Musik betreffend, vol.1 (1766–7), 277–82, 285–92
  • C. Goldoni: Preface to Commedie, vol.13 (Venice, 1775), 10–13
  • J.A. Hiller: Lebensbeschreibung berühmter Musikgelehrten und Tonkünstler neuerer Zeit (Leipzig, 1784/R), 189–90
  • C. Goldoni: Mémoires, vol.1 (Paris, 1787), 286–91
  • C. de Brosses: Lettres historiques et critiques sur l’Italie, vol.1 (Paris, 1799), 297–9
  • G. Orloff: Essai sur l’histoire de la musique en Italie, vol.2 (Paris, 1822), 288–91
  • F. Caffi: Storia della musica teatrale in Venezia (MS, I-Vnm, c. 1850), vol.4, ff.310–15
  • A. Salvatori: ‘Antonio Vivaldi (il Prete Rosso): note biographiche’, Rivista mensile della città di Venezia, vol.7 (1928), 325–46
  • M. Pincherle: ‘Antonio Vivaldi: saggio biografico’, RaM, vol.2 (1929), 513–26, 599–605; Fr. trans. as ‘Antonio Vivaldi: essai biographique’, RdM, vol.11 (1930), 161–70 and 265–81
  • E. Preussner: Die musikalischen Reisen des Herrn von Uffenbach (Kassel, 1949)
  • M. Cornaz: ‘Un Belge à la rencontre d’Antonio Vivaldi: le voyage musical de Corneille van den Branden de Reeth en France et en Italie’, SV, vol.13 (2013), 53–82
J. Personal life, family, priesthood
  • R. Gallo: ‘Antonio Vivaldi, il Prete Rosso: la famiglia – la morte’, Ateneo veneto, vol.124 (1938), 165–72
  • P. Berri: ‘La malattia di Vivaldi’, Musica d’oggi, vol.24 (1942), 9–13
  • H. Pabisch: ‘Neue Dokumente zu Vivaldis Sterbetag’, ÖMz, vol.27 (1972), 82–3
  • G. Vio: ‘Antonio Vivaldi prete’, ISV, vol.1 (1980), 32–57
  • R.-C. Travers: La maladie de Vivaldi (Poitiers, 1982)
  • R.-C. Travers: ‘Une mise au point sur la maladie de Vivaldi’, ISV, vol.3 (1982), 52–60
  • G. Vio: ‘Una nuova abitazione de Vivaldi a Venezia’, ISV, vol.3 (1982), 61–6
  • G. Vio: ‘Antonio Vivaldi e i Vivaldi’, ISV, vol.4 (1983), 82–97
  • C.F. Panagl: ‘Bilddokumente zu Vivaldis Tod in Wien’, ISV, vol.6 (1985), 111–26
  • G. Vio: ‘Ancora due residenze vivaldiane a Venezia’, ISV, vol.8 (1987), 24–30
  • G. Vio: ‘Alla ricerca della data dell’ultimo addio di Vivaldi a Venezia’, ISV, vol.11 (1990), 89–97
  • G. Vio: ‘Appunti vivaldiani’, ISV, vol.12 (1991), 77–86 [concerns family members]
  • G. Vio: ‘Ancora sull’ultima residenza vivaldiana’, ISV, vol.15 (1994), 75–81
  • G. Vio: ‘Antonio Vivaldi chierico veneziano’, ISV, vol.16 (1995), 123–31
  • M. White and M. Talbot: ‘Pietro Mauro, detto “il Vivaldi”: Failed Tenor, Failed Impresario, Failed Husband, Acclaimed Copyist’, Vivaldi, ‘Motezuma’ and the Opera Seria: Essays on a Newly Discovered Work and its Background, ed. M. Talbot (Turnhout, 2008), 37–61
  • E. Selfridge-Field and M. Gianola: ‘La famiglia materna di Antonio Vivaldi’, SV, vol.15 (2015), 13–46
  • A. Ambrosiano: ‘I Vivaldi: una Famiglia di sonadori, barbieri e banditi’, SV, vol.16 (2016), 33–51
  • M. Gianola: ‘La più antica firma autografa di Vivaldi: l’adolescente Antonio e la sua famiglia attraverso la lettura della “Commissaria Temporini”’, SV, vol.16 (2016), 3–30
K. Professional activities
  • M. Pincherle: ‘Vivaldi and the Ospitali of Venice’, MQ, vol.24 (1938), 300–12
  • L. van Hasselt: ‘Heeft Vivaldi in 1738 Amsterdam bezocht?’, Mens en melodie, vol.32 (1977), 398–9
  • N. Mangini: ‘Sui rapporti del Vivaldi col teatro di Sant’Angelo’, Venezia e il melodramma nel Settecento, ed. M.T. Muraro (Florence, 1978), 263–70
  • Vivaldi veneziano europeo: Venice 1978 [incl. L. Moretti: ‘Le inconvenienze teatrali: Documenti inediti su Antonio Vivaldi impresario’, 26–9; M. Talbot: ‘Charles Jennens and Antonio Vivaldi’, 67–75; C. Gallico: ‘Vivaldi dagli archivi di Mantova’, 77–88; L. Moretti: ‘Dopo l’insuccesso di Ferrara: diverbio tra Vivaldi e Antonio Mauro’, 89–99; G. Vio: ‘Precisazioni sui documenti della Pietà in relazione alle “figlie di coro”’, 101–22]
  • G. Vio: ‘Antonio Vivaldi violinista in S. Marco’, ISV, vol.2 (1981), 51–60
  • Antonio Vivaldi: Venice 1981 [incl. R. Strohm: ‘Vivaldi’s Career as an Opera Producer’, 11–63, repr. in R. Strohm: Essays on Handel and Italian Opera (Cambridge, 1985), 122–63; F. della Seta: ‘Documenti inediti su Vivaldi a Roma’, 521–32]
  • L. Cataldi: ‘I rapporti di Vivaldi con il “Teatro detto il Comico” di Mantova’, ISV, vol.6 (1985), 88–110
  • B. Brizi: ‘Vivaldi a Vicenza: una festa barocca del 1713’, ISV, vol.7 (1986), 35–54
  • J.M. Whittemore: Revision of Music Performed at the Venetian Ospedali in the Eighteenth Century (diss., U. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 1986)
  • L. Cataldi: ‘Alcuni documenti relativi alla permanenza di Vivaldi a Mantova’, ISV, vol.8 (1987), 13–23
  • L. Cataldi: ‘La rappresentazione mantovana del “Tito Manlio” di Antonio Vivaldi’, ISV, vol.8 (1987), 52–89
  • L. Cataldi: ‘L’attività operistica di Vivaldi a Mantova’, Nuovi studi vivaldiani: Venice 1987, 131–45
  • W.C. Holmes: ‘Vivaldi e il Teatro La Pergola a Firenze: Nuove fonti’, Nuovi studi vivaldiani: Venice 1987, 117–30
  • O. Termini: ‘Vivaldi at Brescia: the Feast of the Purification at the Chiesa della Pace (1711)’, ISV, vol.9 (1988), 64–74
  • C. Vitali: ‘Vivaldi e il conte bolognese Sicinio Pepoli: Nuovi documenti sulle stagioni vivaldiane al Filarmonico di Verona’, ISV, vol.10 (1989), 25–56
  • C. Vitali: ‘I fratelli Pepoli contro Vivaldi e Anna Girò. Le ragioni di un’assenza’, ISV, vol.12 (1991), 19–46
  • N. Billio D’Arpa: ‘Festività solenni al Santo di Padova: Testimonianze inedite su Vivaldi e su altri musicisti e virtuosi’, Il Santo, vol.32 (1992), 345–59
  • M. Saccardo: ‘Un autografo vivaldiano a Vicenza’, ISV, vol.13 (1992), 17–22
  • E. Selfridge-Field: ‘Vivaldi and the Accademia Filarmonica’, ISV, vol.13 (1992), 39–49
  • C. Vitali: ‘Castelli di carte. Vivaldi, Pietro degli Antonii e l’Accademia Filarmonica di Bologna’, ISV, vol.14 (1993), 75–96
  • P. Cirani: ‘Vivaldi e la musica a Mantova: Documenti inediti e nuovi spunti di riflessione’, Postumia, vol.17 (2006), 183–215
  • B. Glixon and M. White: ‘“Creso tolto a le fiamme”: Girolamo Polani, Antonio Vivaldi and Opera Production at the Teatro S. Angelo, 1705–1706’, SV, vol.8 (2008), 3–19
  • V. Kapsa: ‘Account Books, Names and Music: Count Wenzel von Morzin’s “Virtuosissima Orchestra”’, EMc, vol.40 (2012), 605–20
  • S. Mamy: ‘Antonio Vivaldi aux prises avec des danseurs indisciplinés’, Passi, tracce, percorsi: Scritti sulla danza italiana in omaggio a José Sasportes, ed. A. Pontremoli and P. Veroli (Rome, 2012), 113–28
  • M. Talbot and M. White: ‘A Lawsuit and a Libretto: New Facts Concerning the Pasticcio “La ninfa infelice e fortunata”’, SV, vol.14 (2014), 45–57
L. Patronage and early reception
  • M. Antoine: ‘Antonio Vivaldi et François de Lorraine’, Annales de l’est, vol.5 (1954), 159–62
  • K. Heller: ‘Die Bedeutung J.G. Pisendels für die deutsche Vivaldi-Rezeption’, GfMKB: Leipzig 1966, 247–51
  • T. Volek and M. Skalická: ‘Vivaldis Beziehungen zu den böhmischen Ländern’, AcM, vol.39 (1967), 64–72
  • M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi and a French Ambassador’, ISV, vol.2 (1981), 31–42
  • W. Kolneder: ‘“Laudate Dominum”: Eine Motette von Michel Corrette nach dem Frühlingskonzert op.VIII Nr.1 von Vivaldi’, Logos musicae: Festschrift für Albert Palm, ed. R. Görner (Wiesbaden, 1982), 124–30
  • M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi and the Empire’, ISV, vol.8 (1987), 31–51
  • M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi and Rome: Observations and Hypotheses’, JRMA, vol.113 (1988), 28–46
  • S. Mamy: ‘“Le Printemps” d’Antonio Vivaldi revu et corrigé à Paris par Nicolas Chédeville, Michel Corrette et Jean-Jacques Rousseau’, ISV, vol.13 (1992), 51–65
  • C. Vitali: ‘I nove “principi di altezza” corrispondenti di Vivaldi e la dedica enigmatica del Concerto rv574: alla ricerca dell’indirizzario perduto’, ISV, vol.16 (1995), 59–89
  • K. Vlaardingerbroek: ‘Venetian Echoes on Northern Canals: Some Observations on Vivaldi’s Music in the Netherlands’, ISV, vol.16 (1995), 91–121
  • R. Rasch: ‘Some Remarks on Vivaldi’s “Amsterdam Concerto” (rv562a)’, ISV, vol.19 (1998), 33–43
  • M. Talbot: ‘Wenzel von Morzin as a Patron of Antonio Vivaldi’, Johann Friedrich Fasch und der italienische Stil, ed. K. Musketa (Dessau, 2003), 67–76
  • B. Over: ‘Antonio Vivaldi und Therese Kunigunde von Bayern’, SV, vol.4 (2004), 3–7
  • B. Brover-Lubovsky: ‘“Le quattro regioni”: Vivaldi and the Paradox of Historical Recognition’, Music in Eighteenth-Century Life, ed. M. Parker (Ann Arbor, 2006), 47–68
  • Antonio Vivaldi: Passato e futuro: Venice 2007 [incl. S. Zohn: ‘Telemann the Vivaldian’; J. Hirshberg: ‘Vivaldi, Vivaldianism and Zani: Influence and Individuality’], 95–108; 109–24
  • R. Kintzel: ‘…So Beautiful that I was Almost Beside Myself: Vivaldi and the Basel Collegium Musicum’, EMc, vol.38/1 (2010), 113–17
  • M. Talbot: ‘“The Golden Pippin” and the Extraordinary Adventures in Britain and Ireland of Vivaldi’s Concerto rv519’, SV, vol.10 (2010), 87–124
  • C. Bacciagaluppi: ‘More on Vivaldi in Switzerland’, EMc, vol.39 (2011), 587–603
  • R. Pegah: ‘Musikalische Unterhaltung in Porto Mantovano und ein böhmischer Lautenspieler in Berlin: Notizen zu Interpreten Vivaldis’, SV, vol.12 (2012), 37–50
  • J. Ágústsson: ‘“Zu Lipizza den venetian: Ersten Musico eine Medalie”: Vivaldi Meets Emperor Charles VI, 9 September 1728’, SV, vol.14 (2014), 3–13
  • R. Kintzel: ‘Vivaldi in Colonial America: the Cases of Francis Hopkinson, Peter Pelham, and Thomas Jefferson’, EMc, vol.42/3 (2014), 421–33
  • J. Ágústsson: ‘“La perfetta cognitione”: Francis Stephen of Lorraine, Patron of Vivaldi’, SV, vol.15 (2015), 119–81
  • A. Lombardia: ‘Two Springs: the Reception of Vivaldi’s Violin Concertos in Madrid (1726–1776)’, SV, vol.15 (2015), 73–100
  • K. Vlaardingerbroek: ‘“Extravagant” Vivaldi or “Pleasant” Corelli? A Heated Debate within an Amsterdam Collegium Musicum around 1730’, SV, vol.15 (2015), 103–17
  • J. Ágústsson: ‘Joseph Johann Adam of Liechtenstein, Patron of Vivaldi’, SV, vol.17 (2017), 3–78
M. Works – general studies, stylistic issues
  • J. Mattheson: Der vollkommene Capellmeister (Hamburg, 1739/R), 205
  • C. Avison: An Essay on Musical Expression (London, 1752, 2/1753/R, 3/1775), 42–3
  • J.J. Quantz: Versuch einer Anweisung die Flöte traversiere zu spielen (Berlin, 1752, 3/1789/R; Eng. trans., 1966 as On Playing the Flute)
  • W. Hayes: Remarks on Mr. Avison’s Essay on Musical Expression (London, 1753), 39–41
  • J.J. Quantz: ‘Lebenslauf’, in F.W. Marpurg Historisch-kritische Beyträge zur Aufnahme der Musik, vol.1 (Berlin, 1754/R), 197–250
  • R.G. Pauly: ‘Benedetto Marcello’s Satire on Early 18th-Century Opera’, MQ, vol.34 (1948), 222–33
  • W. Kolneder: ‘Vivaldi als Bearbeiter eigener Werke’, AcM, vol.24 (1952), 45–52
  • W. Kolneder: Melodietypen bei Vivaldi (Zürich, 1973)
  • D. Burrows: ‘Style in Culture: Vivaldi, Zeno, and Ricci’, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, vol.4 (1973–4), 1–23
  • W. Kolneder: ‘Musikalische Symbolik bei Vivaldi’, Vivaldi veneziano europeo: Venice 1978, 13–23
  • P. Ryom: ‘Antonio Vivaldi: les relations entre les opéras et la musique instrumentale’, Venezia e il melodramma nel Settecento, ed. M.T. Muraro (Florence, 1978), 249–62
  • M. Talbot: ‘Ungewöhnliche Tonleiterformen bei Vivaldi’, Vivaldi-Studien: Dresden 1978, 73–80, 176–9
  • B. Brover-Lubovsky: ‘Vivaldi and Contemporary German Music Theory’, ISV, vol.20 (1999), 59–81
  • B. Brover-Lubovsky: ‘Between Modality and Tonality: Vivaldi’s Harmony’, ISV, vol.21 (2000), 111–31
  • B. Brover-Lubovsky: ‘“Die schwarze Gredel”, or the Parallel Minor Key in Vivaldi’s Instrumental Music’, SV, vol.3 (2003), 105–31
  • B. Brover-Lubovsky: ‘When the Dominant doesn’t Dominate: Tonal Structure in Vivaldi’s Concertos’, Ad parnassum vol.2/4 (Oct. 2004), 131–151
  • C. Fertonani: ‘Vivaldi e l’esotico’, Le arti della scena e l’esoticismo in età moderna, ed. F Corticelli and P. Maione (Naples, 2006)
  • N. Lockey: ‘Formal Structure in Vivaldi’s Variation Sets’, SV, vol.6 (2006), 53–74
  • N. Lockey: ‘Vivaldi and the Siciliana: Towards a Critical Appraisal’, Antonio Vivaldi: Passato e futuro: Venice 2007, 141–60
  • B. Brover-Lubovsky: Tonal Space in the Music of Antonio Vivaldi (Bloomington, 2008)
  • Vivaldi, ‘Motezuma’ and the Opera Seria: Essays on a Newly Discovered Work and its Background, ed. M. Talbot (Turnhout, 2008) [incl. K. Markstrom: ‘The Vivaldi-Vinci Interconnections, 1724–26 and beyond: Implications for the Late Style of Vivaldi’, 103–46; M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi’s “Late” Style: Final Fruition or Terminal Decline?’, 147–68]
  • M. Talbot: Vivaldi and Fugue, Quaderni vivaldiani, 15 (Florence, 2009)
  • N. Lockey: ‘The Viola as a Secret Weapon in Vivaldi’s Orchestral Revolution: Sonority and Texture in Late Baroque Italian Music’ (diss., Princeton U., 2013)
  • B. Brover-Lubovsky: ‘Concepts of Modal Dualism at the Time of Vivaldi’, Fulgeat sol frontis decorae: Studi in onore di Michael Talbot, Saggi vivaldiani, 1, ed. A. Borin and J. Cameron (Venice, 2016), 65–82
N. Works – instrumental
  • L. Torchi: La musica istrumentale in Italia nei secoli XVI, XVII e XVIII (Turin, 1901)
  • S. Clercx: ‘A propos des sinfonies de Vivaldi’, La revue internationale de musique, no.1 (1938), 632–5
  • W.S. Newman: ‘The Sonatas of Albinoni and Vivaldi’, JAMS, vol.5 (1952), 99–113
  • R. Eller: ‘Geschichtliche Stellung und Wandlung der Vivaldischen Konzertform’, Musikwissenschaftlicher Kongress: Vienna 1956, 150–55
  • R. Eller: Das Formprinzip des Vivaldischen Konzerts: Studien zur Geschichte des Instrumentalkonzerts und zum Stilwandel in der ersten Hälfte des 18. Jahrhunderts (diss., U. of Leipzig, 1957)
  • H.R. Rarig: The Instrumental Sonatas of Antonio Vivaldi (diss., U. of Michigan, 1958)
  • A. Hutchings: The Baroque Concerto (London, 1961, 3/1973)
  • W. Kolneder: Die Solokonzertform bei Vivaldi, Sammlung musikwissenschaftlicher Abhandlungen, 42 (Strasbourg and Baden-Baden, 1961)
  • W. Kolneder: ‘Vivaldis Aria-Concerto’, DJbM, vol.9 (1964), 17–27
  • P. Ryom: ‘Le concerto “Per il Natale” de Vivaldi’, Vivaldi informations, vol.1 (1971–2), 75–80
  • M. Talbot: ‘The Concerto Allegro in the Early Eighteenth Century’, ML, vol.52 (1971), 8–18, 159–72
  • I. Farup-Madsen: Vivaldis anvendelse af fløjteinstrumenter (diss., U. of Copenhagen, 1974)
  • R.D. Seidler: The Bassoon Concertos of Antonio Vivaldi (diss., Catholic U. of America, 1974)
  • K. Heller: ‘Zu einigen Aspekten der solistischen Improvisation im Instrumentalkonzert des frühen 18. Jahrhunderts’, Zu Fragen des Instrumentariums, der Besetzung und Improvisation in der ersten Hälfte des 18. Jahrhunderts: Blankenburg, Harz, 1975, 80–87
  • E. Selfridge-Field: Venetian Instrumental Music from Gabrieli to Vivaldi (Oxford, 1975, 3/1994)
  • Vivaldi-Studien: Dresden 1978 [incl. K. Heller: ‘Vivaldi’s Ripienkonzerte: Bemerkungen zu einigen ausgewählten Problemen’, 1–31, 169–73; P. Ahnsehl: ‘Bemerkungen zur Rezeption der Vivaldischen Konzertform durch die mittel- und norddeutschen Komponisten im Umkreis Bachs’, 59–72]
  • N. Ohmura: ‘I “concerti senza orchestra” di Antonio Vivaldi’, NRMI, vol.13 (1979), 119–49
  • M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi’s Op. 5 Sonatas’, The Strad, vol.90 (1979–80), 678–81
  • K. Heller: ‘Anmerkungen zu Vivaldis Opernsinfonien’, Antonio Vivaldi: Venice 1981, 207–16
  • M. Talbot: ‘A Vivaldi Sonata with Obbligato Organ in Dresden’, Organ Yearbook, vol.12 (1981), 81–103
  • K. Heller: Concerto ripieno und Sinfonia bei Vivaldi (diss., U. of Rostock, 1983)
  • K. Heller: ‘Über die Beziehungen zwischen einigen Concerto- und Sinfonia-Sätzen Vivaldis’, ISV, vol.4 (1983), 41–60
  • H. Hell: ‘Ein Doppelkonzert Antonio Vivaldis als Triosonate’, AnMc, no.22 (1984), 149–96 [concerns rv516 and 71]
  • M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi’s Conch Concerto’, ISV, vol.5 (1984), 66–82
  • P. Ahnsehl: ‘Geneis, Wesen, Weiterwirken: Miszellen zur Vivaldischen Ritornellform’, ISV, vol.6 (1985), 74–86
  • M. Stegemann: ‘Vivaldi und das Horn: Mutmassungen über die Genese der Concerti rv538 und rv539’, ISV, vol.7 (1986), 62–70
  • M. Talbot: ‘“Lingua romana in bocca veneziana”: Vivaldi, Corelli, and the Roman School’, Studi corelliani IV: Fusignano 1986, 303–18
  • L. Della Libera: Il flauto traverso in Vivaldi (diss., U. of Rome, 1986–7)
  • Nuovi studi vivaldiani: Venice 1987 [incl. N. Dubowy: ‘Anmerkungen zur Form in den frühen Konzerten Antonio Vivaldis’, 431–49; M. Grattoni: ‘“Qui si ferma a piacimento”: Struttura e funzione della cadenza nei concerti di Vivaldi’, 472–92]
  • C. Fertonani: L’ ‘imitazion convenevole’: I concerti ‘a programma’ di Antonio Vivaldi e l’estetica del primo Settecento (diss., U. of Milan, 1987–8)
  • P. Whitmore: ‘Towards an Understanding of the Capriccio’, JRMA, vol.113 (1988), 47–56
  • P. Everett: ‘Vivaldi’s Paraphrased Oboe Concertos of the 1730s’, La prima ‘Settimana musicale senese’ e la Vivaldi Renaissance (1939–1989): Siena 1989 [Chigiana, new ser., vol.21 (1989)], 197–216
  • F. Doé de Maindreville: Les neuf sonates pour violoncello et basse continue de A. Vivaldi (diss., U. of Paris IV, 1991)
  • E. Selfridge-Field: ‘Vivaldi’s Cello Sonatas’, Vivaldi: Vero e falso: Problemi di attribuzione: Poitiers 1991, 127–48
  • C. Fertonani: Antonio Vivaldi: La simbologia musicale nei concerti a programma (Pordenone, 1992)
  • C. White: From Vivaldi to Viotti: a History of the Early Classical Violin Concerto (Philadelphia, 1992)
  • A. Hermes-Neumann: Die Flötenkonzerte von Antonio Vivaldi (Egelsbach, 1993)
  • P.A. Mori: Vivaldi’s Bassoon Concerto Variants: a Schenkerian Approach (diss., Peabody Institute, Johns Hopkins U., Baltimore, 1993)
  • W. Alexander: ‘Zur Spezifik des Ritornells in Antonio Vivaldis Konzerten für mehrere verschiedene Instrumente, Orchester und Basso continuo’, Rudolf Eller zum achzigsten Geburtstag, ed. K. Heller and A. Waczkat (Rostock, 1994), 41–9
  • P. Ryom: Vivaldis koncerter (Copenhagen, 1994)
  • P. Everett: Vivaldi: ‘The Four Seasons’ and Other Concertos, Op.8 (Cambridge, 1996)
  • U. Zilkens: Antonio Vivaldi zwischen Naturalismus und Pop: Die vier Jahreszeiten im Spiegel ihrer Interpretationen durch Musiktheoretiker und Musiker, in Bearbeitungen und auf Plattencovern (Cologne-Rodenkirchen, 1996) [incl. discography by R.-C. Travers]
  • C. Fertonani: ‘Antonio Vivaldi: le sonate a tré’, ISV, vol.18 (1997), 5–36
  • C. Fertonani: La musica strumentale di Antonio Vivaldi (Florence, 1997)
  • M. Talbot: ‘The “Improvisata”: a “Characteristic” Sinfonia by Vivaldi?’, SV, vol.1 (2001), 119–35 [concerns rv801; includes critical edition]
  • J. Hirshberg and S. McVeigh: The Solo Italian Concerto, 1700–1760: Rhetorical Strategies and Style History (Woodbridge, 2004)
  • F. Ammetto: ‘Le sinfonie rv 22, 135, e 162 di Antonio Vivaldi: Analisi e ipotesi di testo originale’, Esercizi. Musica e Spettacolo, vol.19 (n.s. 10), (2004–5), 7–50
  • M. Talbot: ‘The “Stylized” Dance in Italian Sonatas of the Late Baroque’, De Musica Disserenda, vol.2 (2006), 99–105
  • O. Fourés: L’œuvre pour violon d’Antonio Vivaldi, ossia il violino in maschera (diss., U. Lumière de Lyon II, 2007)
  • F.M. Sardelli: Vivaldi’s Music for Flute and Recorder, English trans. M. Talbot (Aldershot, 2007)
  • Antonio Vivaldi: Passato e futuro: Venice 2007 [incl. K. Heller: ‘Zur Sologestaltung in späten Violinkonzerten Vivaldis: Phrasenbildung, Motivarbeit, Stellung der Soloteile im Satzganzen’; S. Zips: ‘Die Ritornellform in den jeweils zweiten Sätzen der Cellosonaten rv40 und rv43’], 73–88; 89–94
  • M. Talbot: ‘Die Violine als Imitator anderer Instrumente in der Musik von Antonio Vivaldi und Tomaso Albinoni’, Telemann, der musikalische Maler: Telemann-Kompositionen im Notenarchiv der Sing-Akademie zu Berlin, ed. C. Lange and B. Reipsch (Hildesheim, 2010), 56–69
  • M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi and the Riddle of the Altered Basses’, HJb 2012, 423–35
  • F. Ammetto: I Concerti per due Violini di Vivaldi, Quaderni vivaldiani, 18 (Florence, 2013)
  • M. Talbot: ‘Giovanni Batista Vivaldi Copies Music by Telemann: New Light on the Genesis of Antonio Vivaldi’s Chamber Concertos’, SV, vol.15 (2015), 55–71
  • M. Ossi: ‘Musical Representation and Vivaldi’s Concerto “Il Proteo, ò Il mondo al rovverscio”, rv544/572’, JAMS vol.69/1 (Spring, 2016), 111–77
  • Fulgeat sol frontis decorae: Studi in onore di Michael Talbot, Saggi vivaldiani, 1, ed. A. Borin and J. Cameron (Venice, 2016) [incl. F. Ammetto: ‘Dal manoscritto alla stampa: Aspetti del processo creativo nella Sonata rv35a/35 di Vivaldi’, 19–27; E. Careri: ‘Novità formali nelle sonate per violino Op.II di Vivaldi’, 85–93; K. Heller: ‘Zu der in Dresden überlieferten Fassung von Vivaldis Concerto rv564/564a: Informationen, Beobachtungen, Überlegungen’, 129–42]
  • N. Lockey: ‘Antonio Vivaldi and the Sublime Seasons: Sonority and Texture as Expressive Devices in Early Eighteenth-Century Italian Music’, Eighteenth-Century Music, vol.14/2 (2017), 265–83
O. Works – operas
  • B. Marcello: Il teatro alla moda, o sia Metodo sicuro e facile per il ben comporre ed eseguire l’opere italiane in musica all’uso moderno (Venice, 1720; Eng. trans. in MQ, vol.34 (1948), 371–403, vol.35 (1949), 85–105; also trans. in StrunkSR1)
  • L.E. Rowell: Four Operas of Antonio Vivaldi (diss., U. of Rochester, 1959)
  • H.C. Wolff: ‘Vivaldi und der Stil der italienischen Oper’, AcM, vol.40 (1968), 179–86
  • H. Maurer: The Independent Arias of Antonio Vivaldi in Foà 28 (diss., Indiana U., 1974)
  • R. Strohm: Italienische Opernarien des frühen Settecento (1720–30), AnMc, no.16 (1976)
  • E. Cross: ‘Vivaldi as Opera Composer: “Griselda”’, MT, vol.119 (1978), 411–16
  • E. Cross: ‘Vivaldi’s Operatic Borrowings’, ML, vol.59 (1978), 429–39
  • J.W. Hill: ‘Vivaldi’s Griselda’, JAMS, vol.31 (1978), 53–82
  • R. Strohm: ‘Bemerkungen zu Vivaldi und der Oper seiner Zeit’, Vivaldi-Studien: Dresden 1978, 81–99
  • R. Strohm: ‘Zu Vivaldis Opernschaffen’, Venezia e il melodramma nel Settecento, ed. M.T. Muraro (Florence, 1978), 237–48
  • Vivaldi veneziano europeo: Venice 1978 [incl. F. Degrada: ‘Vivaldi e Metastasio: note in margine a una lettura dell’Olimpiade’, 155–81; B. Brizi: ‘Domenico Lalli librettista de Vivaldi?’, 183–204; G. Folena: ‘Prima la parola, poi la musica: Scipione Maffei poeta per musica e la Fida ninfa’, 205–33; M.T. Muraro and E. Povoledo: ‘Le scene della Fida ninfa. Maffei, Vivaldi e Francesco Bibiena’, 235–52]
  • M. Rinaldi: Il teatro musicale di Antonio Vivaldi (Florence, 1979)
  • Opera & Vivaldi: Dallas 1980 [incl. E. Cross: ‘The Relationship between Text and Music in the Operas of Vivaldi’, 279–307; K. Kropfinger: ‘Vivaldi as Self-Borrower’, 308–26; J.W. Hill: ‘Vivaldi’s Orlando: Sources and Contributing Factors’, 327–46]
  • E. Cross: The Late Operas of Antonio Vivaldi, 1727–1738 (Ann Arbor, 1981)
  • Antonio Vivaldi: Venice 1981 [incl. B. Brizi: ‘Gli Orlandi di Vivaldi attraverso i libretti’, 315–30; M.G. Pensa: ‘L’Atenaide di Apostolo Zeno adattata per la musica di Vivaldi’, 331–44; F. Fido: ‘Le tre Griselde. Appunti su Goldoni librettista di Vivaldi’, 345–63]
  • J.W. Hill: ‘Vivaldi’s “Ottone in villa” (Vicenza, 1713): a Study in Musical Drama’, DMV, vol.12 (1983), pp.vii–xxxvii
  • K. Hortschansky: ‘Arientexte Metastasios in Vivaldis Opern’, ISV, vol.4 (1983), 61–75
  • E. Selfridge-Field: ‘Dating Vivaldi’s Venetian Operas’, ISV, vol.5 (1984), 53–65
  • P. Weiss: ‘Venetian Commedia Dell’Arte “Operas” in the Age of Vivaldi’, MQ, vol.70 (1984), 195–217
  • E. Stipcevic: ‘Sull’opera “Scanderbeg” di Antonio Vivaldi’, Subsidia musica veneta, vol.5 (1985–6), 1–119
  • F. Tàmmaro: ‘Il “Farnace” di Vivaldi: Problemi di ricostruzione’, Studi musicali, vol.15 (1986), 213–56
  • F. Tàmmaro: ‘Il “Farnace” fiorentino del 1733’, ISV, vol.7 (1986), 55–61
  • R. Strohm: ‘Vivaldi’s and Handel’s Settings of Giustino’, Music and Theatre: Essays in Honour of Winton Dean, ed. N. Fortune (Cambridge, 1987), 131–58
  • Nuovi studi vivaldiani: Venice 1987 [incl. F. Tàmmaro: ‘I pasticci di Vivaldi: “Dorilla in Tempe”’, 147–84; A.L. Bellina, B. Brizi, and M.G. Pensa: ‘Il pasticcio “Bajazet”: la “favola” del Gran Tamerlano nella messinscena di Vivaldi’, 185–272; M. Collins: ‘L’orchestra nelle opere teatrali di Vivaldi’, 285–312; J.W. Hill: ‘A Computer-Based Analytical Concordance of Vivaldi’s Aria Texts: First Findings and Puzzling New Questions about Self-Borrowing’, 511–34; D.E. Monson: ‘The Trail of Vivaldi’s Singers: Vivaldi in Rome’, 563–89]
  • U. Roseman: Antonio Vivaldi’s ‘Orlando finto pazzo’: an Analysis and Critical Edition (diss., UCLA, 1989)
  • D.E. Freeman: The Opera Theater of Count Franz Anton von Sporck in Prague (New York, 1992)
  • D.E. Freeman: ‘“Orlando Furioso” in the Bohemian Lands: Was Vivaldi’s Music Really Used?’, ISV, vol.14 (1993), 51–74
  • W.C. Holmes: Opera Observed: Views of a Florentine Impresario in the Early Eighteenth Century (Chicago, 1993)
  • L. Pancino: ‘“Arsilda regina di Ponto”: Per una ricostruzione della versione primitiva’, ISV, vol.15 (1994), 51–73
  • E. Cross: ‘Vivaldi and the Pasticcio: Text and Music in Tamerlano’, Con che soavità: Studies in Italian Opera, Song, and Dance, ed. T. Carter and I. Fenlon (Oxford, 1995), 275–311
  • L. Pancino: ‘Le opere di Vivaldi nel raffronto fra libretti e partiture, i: “Ottone in villa”; “Orlando finto pazzo”; “Arsilda regina di Ponto”; “L’incoronazione di Dario”’, ISV, vol.16 (1995), 5–58
  • L. Pancino: ‘Le opere di Vivaldi nel raffronto fra libretti e partiture, ii: “Armida al campo d’Egitto”: “Teuzzone”; “Tito Manlio”’, ISV, vol.17 (1996), 5–67
  • O. Rouvière: ‘Siro di Vivaldi, ou Metastasio à Venise’, ISV, vol.18 (1997), 45–61
  • L. Pancino: ‘Le opere di Vivaldi nel raffronto fra libretti e partiture, iii: “La verità in cimento”; “La virtù trionfanate dell’amore e dell’odio, overo il Tigrane”; “Giustino”’, ISV, vol.19 (1998), 5–31
  • O. Rouvière: ‘De Zeno à Goldoni: Trois versions de “Griselda”’, ISV, vol.19 (1998), 75–99
  • L. Pancino: ‘Le opere di Vivaldi nel raffronto tra libretti e partiture, iv: “Dorilla in Tempe”; “Farnace”’, ISV, vol.20 (1999), 5–56
  • L. Pancino: ‘Le opere di Vivaldi nel raffronto tra libretti e partiture, v: “Orlando furioso”; “Atenaide”’, ISV, vol.21 (2000), 5–32
  • F. Delaméa: ‘“La Silva”, rv734: Ombres et lumières sur l’opéra milanais de Vivaldi’, SV, vol.1 (2001), 27–116
  • L. Pancino: ‘Le opere di Vivaldi nel raffronto tra libretti e partiture, vi: “La fida ninfa”; “L’Olimpiade”’, SV, vol.1 (2001), 7–25
  • L. Pancino: ‘Le opere di Vivaldi nel raffronto tra libretti e partiture, vii: “Bajazet”; “La Griselda”’, SV, vol.2 (2002), 3–22
  • L. Pancino: ‘Le opere di Vivaldi nel raffronto tra libretti e partiture, viii: “Catone in Utica”; “Rosmira (fedele)”’, SV, vol.3 (2003), 3–30
  • L. Pancino: ‘Le opere di Vivaldi nel raffronto fra libretti e partiture. ix: ‘Motezuma”’, SV, vol.5 (2005), 3–10
  • Antonio Vivaldi: Passato e futuro: Venice 2007 [incl. P.G. Gillio: ‘Relazioni metriche tra testo poetico e testo musicale nel melodramma di Vivaldi’; M. Bizzarini: ‘I segreti di Griselda. Nuove riflessioni sulla collaborazione tra Vivaldi e Goldoni’; R. Strohm: ‘From She-Devil to Recalcitrant Mother: Women and the “Male Gaze” in Vivaldi’s Operas’; M.I. Biggi: ‘Soggetti, Immagini e Scenografie’; F. Menchelli-Buttini: ‘Hasse e Vivaldi’], 279–306; 307–18; 461–80; 481–86; 487–508
  • R. Strohm: ‘“Argippo” in “Germania”’, SV, vol.8 (2008), 111–26
  • R. Strohm: The Operas of Antonio Vivaldi, Quaderni vivaldiani, 13 (Florence, 2008)
  • Vivaldi, ‘Motezuma’ and the Opera Seria: Essays on a Newly Discovered Work and its Background, ed. M. Talbot (Turnhout, 2008) [incl. S. Voss: ‘Antonio Vivaldi’s Dramma per Musica ‘Motezuma’: Some Observations on its Libretto and Music’, 1–18; J. Maehder: ‘Alvise Giusti’s Libretto ‘Motezuma’ and the Conquest of Mexico in Eighteenth-Century Italian “Opera Seria”’, 63–80; M. Bucciarelli: ‘Taming the Exotic: Vivaldi’s “Armida al campo d’Egitto”’, 81–102]
  • L. Cataldi: ‘La “Griselda” di Vivaldi ripudiata da Goldoni: Storia di un’opera esemplare’, SV, vol.13 (2013), 85–141
  • D. Bichmann: ‘Antonio Marchi und Antonio Vivaldi im Dienst des venezianischen Publikums: Die Fassungen der “Costanza trionfante degl’amori e degl’odii” und ihr zeitpolitischer Kontext’, SV, vol.16 (2016), 103–145
P. Works – other vocal works
  • P. Damilano: ‘Antonio Vivaldi compose due vespri?’, NRMI, vol.3 (1969), 652–63
  • M.M. Dunham: The Secular Cantatas of Antonio Vivaldi in the Foà Collection (diss., U. of Michigan, 1969)
  • R.E. Fort: An Analysis of Thirteen Vesper Psalms of Antonio Vivaldi Contained in the Foà-Giordano Manuscripts (diss., Union Theological Seminary, 1971)
  • D. Arnold: ‘Vivaldi’s Church Music: an Introduction’, EMc, vol.1 (1973), 66–74
  • W. Witzenmann: ‘“Credo in unum Deum”: Un confronto tra interpretazioni di Gasparini e di Vivaldi’, Francesco Gasparini: Camaiore 1978 [Quaderni della RaM, vol.6 (1981)], 119–32
  • Vivaldi veneziano europeo: Venice 1978 [incl. D. Arnold: ‘Vivaldi’s Motets for Solo Voice’, 37–48; E. Selfridge-Field: ‘Juditha in Historical Perspective: Scarlatti, Gasparini, Marcello and Vivaldi’, 135–53; F. Degrada: ‘Vivaldi e Metastasio: note in margine a una lettura dell’Olimpiade’, 155–81; B. Brizi: ‘Domenico Lalli librettista de Vivaldi?’, 183–204; G. Folena: ‘Prima la parola, poi la musica: Scipione Maffei poeta per musica e la Fida ninfa’, 205–33; M.T. Muraro and E. Povoledo: ‘Le scene della Fida ninfa. Maffei, Vivaldi e Francesco Bibiena’, 235–52]
  • D. Arnold: ‘The Solo Motet in Venice (1625–1775)’, PRMA, vol.106 (1979–80), 56–68
  • L. Bianchi: ‘Intorno alla Juditha di Vivaldi’, NRMI, vol.13 (1979), 204–9
  • K.D. Graumann: Antonio Vivaldi: Performance Editions of Nine Sacred Vocal Works on Liturgical Texts Preserved in the Raccolta Foà-Giordano (diss., U. of Oklahoma, 1981)
  • Antonio Vivaldi: Venice 1981 [incl. M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi’s Serenatas: Long Cantatas or Short Operas?’, 67–96; C. Timms: ‘The Dramatic in Vivaldi’s Cantatas’, 97–129; G. Folena: ‘La cantata e Vivaldi’, 131–90; H. Hucke: ‘Vivaldi und die vokale Kirchenmusik des Settecento’, 191–206]
  • P.G. Gillio: ‘Il mottetto per voce sola nella produzione di Antonio Vivaldi’, Rivista internazionale di musica sacra, vol.6i (1985), 137–96
  • E. Selfridge-Field: ‘“La pastorella sul primo albore”: a Case Study in the Relationship between Text and Music in the Cantatas of Marcello and Vivaldi’, Nuovi studi vivaldiani: Venice 1987, 493–500
  • K. Vlaardingerbroek: ‘Thematic Links to Other Works in the “Confitebor” rv596: their Nature and Context’, ISV, vol.9 (1988), 47–63
  • M. Talbot: ‘New Light on Vivaldi’s “Stabat Mater”’, ISV, vol.13 (1992), 23–37
  • M. Talbot and P. Everett: ‘Homage to a French King: Two Serenatas by Vivaldi (Venice, 1725 and ca. 1726)’, DMV, vol.15 (1995), pp.ix–lxxxvii
  • M. Talbot: The Sacred Vocal Music of Antonio Vivaldi (Florence, 1995)
  • L. Cataldi: ‘Da “Ah, ch’infelice sempre” a “Cessate, omai cessate”: Riflessioni sulle varianti della cantata vivaldiana rv684’, SV, vol.1 (2001), 137–52
  • M. Talbot: ‘How Recitatives End and Arias Begin in the Solo Cantatas of Antonio Vivaldi’, JRMA, vol.126 (2001), 169–92
  • J. Cameron: ‘Vivaldi’s “Crucifixus” in its Descriptive and Rhetorical Context’, SV, vol.3 (2003), 133–52
  • J. Steinheuer: ‘Vermischter Geschmack “all’italien”: Antonio Vivaldis “La Senna festeggiante”, Französiche Musik im europäischem Kontext, ed. D. Hoffmann-Axtheim, Basler Jahrbuch für historische Musikpraxis, vol.28 (Winterthur, 2004), 161–86
  • R. Kintzel and C.E. Muntz: ‘Vivaldi’s Lost Exodus and Epiphany Oratorios: I. “Moyses Deus Pharaonis”, rv643’, SV, vol.6 (2006), 105–57
  • M. Talbot: The Chamber Cantatas of Antonio Vivaldi (Woodbridge, 2006)
  • M. Talbot: ‘Mythology in the Service of Eulogy: the Serenata “Andromeda liberata”’, Mediterranean Myths from Classical Antiquity to the Eighteenth Century, ed. M. Kokole, B. Murovec, M. Ŝaŝel Kos, and M. Talbot (Ljubljana, 2006), 131–59
  • M. Talbot: ‘One Composer, One Psalm, One Key, Three Settings: Vivaldi and the “Dixit Dominus”’, SV, vol.6 (2006), 77–103
  • R. Kintzel: ‘Vivaldi’s Lost Exodus and Epiphany Oratorios: II. “L’adorazione delli tre re magi al bambino Gesù nella capanna di Betleme”, rv645’, SV, vol.7 (2007), 53–108
  • M. Talbot: ‘How Operatic is Vivaldi’s “Juditha triumphans”?’, Music as Social and Cultural Practice: Essays in Honour of Reinhard Strohm, ed. M. Bucciarelli and B. Joncus (Woodbridge, 2007), 214–31
  • Antonio Vivaldi: Passato e futuro: Venice 2007 [incl. J. Cameron: ‘An Acknowledgement of Sacred Music Conventions: Vivaldi’s Et incarnatus and Crucifixus (RV 591)’; E. Corp: ‘La Senna festeggiante Reconsidered: Some Possible Implications of its Literary Text’], 217–30; 231–38
  • R. Kintzel: ‘Completing the Tour: Vivaldi’s first Oratorio: “La vittoria navale”, rv782’, SV, vol.8 (2008), 47–85
  • R. Kintzel: ‘Vivaldi’s Serenatas Revisited, I. The “French Serenatas” of 1725–1727: “Gloria e Himeneo”, “La Senna festeggiante,” and “L’unione della Pace e di Marte”, SV, vol.9 (2009), 33–78
  • R. Kintzel: ‘Vivaldi’s Serenatas Revisted, II. The Mantuan “Serenata a quattro” rv692’, SV, vol.10 (2010), 39–73
  • R. Kintzel: ‘Vivaldi’s Serenatas Revisted, III. Vivaldi’s First Serenata, “Le gare del dovere”, rv688’, SV, vol.11 (2011), 33–60
  • Fulgeat sol frontis decorae. Studi in onore di Michael Talbot, Saggi vivaldiani, 1, ed. A. Borin and J. Cameron (Venice, 2016) [incl. A. Borin: ‘Vivaldi e l’affaire Tourreil. Nuove ipotesi sulla “Serenata à 3”, rv690’, 41–62; P. Everett: ‘Vivaldi at Work: the Late Cantatas and the Consignment for Dresden’, 97–112; E. Selfridge-Field: ‘Schulenburg, Corfù and the Dating of “Juditha triumphans”, rv644’, 207–20]
Q. Works – instrumentation and performance practice
  • W. Kolneder: Aufführungspraxis bei Vivaldi (Leipzig, 1955, 2/1973)
  • D.S. Higbee: ‘Michel Corrette on the Piccolo and Speculations regarding Vivaldi’s “flautino”’, GSJ, vol.17 (1964), 115–16
  • D. Lasocki: ‘Vivaldi and the Recorder’, American Recorder, vol.9 (1968), 13–14; repr. in Recorder and Music Magazine, vol.3 (1969), 22–7
  • K. Heller: ‘Tendenzen der Tempo-Differenzierung im Orchesterallegro Vivaldis’, Die Blasinstrumente und ihre Verwendung sowie zu Fragen des Tempos in der ersten Hälfte des 18. Jahrhunderts: Blankenburg, Harz, 1976, 79–84
  • P. Avanzi: ‘Sulla realizzazione del basso continuo nell’opera 2 di Antonio Vivaldi’, Ricerche musicali, vol.2 (1978), 113–57
  • K. Heller: ‘Zwei “Vivaldi-Orchester” in Dresden und Venedig’, Musikzentren in der ersten Hälfte des 18. Jahrhunderts und ihre Ausstrahlung: Blankenburg, Harz, 1978, 56–63
  • E. Selfridge-Field: ‘Vivaldi’s Esoteric Instruments’, EMc, vol.6 (1978), 332–8
  • M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi e lo chalumeau’, RIM, vol.15 (1980), 153–81
  • T.E. Hoeprich: ‘Finding a Clarinet for the Three Concertos by Vivaldi’, EMc, vol.11 (1983), 61–4
  • C. Lawson: ‘Single-Reed Instruments in the Music of Vivaldi’, La prima ‘Settimana musicale senese’ e la Vivaldi Renaissance (1939–1989): Siena 1989 [Chigiana, new ser., vol.21 (1989)], 185–96
  • M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi and the Concertante Organ’, The Organist, vol.2/2 (1992), 1–3
  • M. Talbot: ‘Tenors and Basses at the Venetian Ospedali’, AcM, vol.66 (1994), 128–38
  • M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi and the English Viol’, EMc, vol.30 (2002), 381–94
  • B. Hoffmann: ‘Il violoncello all’inglese’, SV, vol.4 (2004), 43–51
  • M. Talbot: ‘Vivaldi and the “Violino in tromba marina”’, The Consort, vol.61 (2005), 5–17
  • Antonio Vivaldi: Passato e futuro: Venice 2007 [incl. E. Careri: ‘Sull’uso vivaldiano dei segni dinamici’; G. Thomé: ‘Les “Claren”, “Clarini” et “Clarinet” dans les œuvres de Vivaldi’], 319–38; 381–94
  • M. Bizzarini: ‘“Allegro più ch’è possibile”, Vivaldi e la velocità’, Fulgeat sol frontis decorae: Studi in onore di Michael Talbot, Saggi vivaldiani, 1, ed. A. Borin and J. Cameron (Venice, 2016), 29–38
R. Revival
  • J.-P. Demoulin: ‘Chronologie des principaux événements qui ont marqué la résurrection d’Antonio Vivaldi, au vingtième siècle’, Vivaldiana, vol.1 (1969), 21–8
  • M. Pincherle: ‘Rencontre de Vivaldi’, Vivaldiana, vol.1 (1969), 7–11
  • M. Rinaldi: ‘Vita, morte e risurrezione di Antonio Vivaldi’, Studi musicali, vol.7 (1978), 189–214
  • Vivaldi veneziano europeo: Venice 1978 [incl. M. Rinaldi: ‘Itinerario della rivalutazione vivaldiana’, 289–302; F. Nicolodi: ‘Vivaldi nell’attività di Alfredo Casella organizzatore e interprete’, 303–32]
  • M. Abbado: ‘Antonio Vivaldi nel nostro secolo, con particolare riferimento alle sue opere strumentali’, NRMI, vol.13 (1979), 79–112
  • F. Nicolodi: Gusti e tendenze del Novecento musicale in Italia (Florence, 1982), 163–204
  • Nuovi studi vivaldiani: Venice 1987 [incl. K. Heller: ‘Zum Vivaldi-Bild im deutschen Schrifttum des 19. Jahrhunderts’, 19–32; W. Kolneder: ‘Vivaldi in der Polemik Schreyer-Spitta’, 33–44; R.-C. Travers: ‘L’exhumation des opéras de Vivaldi au XX siècle’, 313–54; H.L. Hirsch: ‘VI? VAL? DI? Der “Prete Rosso” in den Medien: Versuch einer Spurensicherung’, 713–28]
  • La prima ‘Settimana musicale senese’ e la Vivaldi Renaissance (1939–1989): Siena 1989 [Chigiana, new ser., vol.21 (1989)], [incl. F. Nicolodi: ‘Fonti critiche e storiografiche della riscoperta italiana di Vivaldi’, 19–39; L. Alberti: ‘Come nacque a Venezia il Centro di Studi Vivaldiani’, 53–64; R. Meloncelli: ‘Antonio Vivaldi e il rinnovamento musicale a Roma tra le due guerre’, 65–111; M. Talbot: ‘The Fortunes of Vivaldi Biography, from Pincherle to the Present’, 113–35; B. Brizi: ‘Per l’edizione dei testi operistici vivaldiani’, 137–60; J.-P. Demoulin: ‘Du rôle complémentaire du concert et du disque dans l’histoire de la renaissance de Vivaldi au XXème siècle’, 217–34; C. Fertonani: ‘Edizioni e revisioni vivaldiane in Italia nella prima metà del Novecento (1919–43)’, 235–66]
  • Cinquant’anni di produzione e consumi della musica dell’età di Vivaldi: Venice 1997 [incl. R.-C. Travers: ‘1947–1997: Vivaldi, les baroques et la critique: toute une histoire’, 53–74; F. Delaméa: ‘Les opéras de Vivaldi au XXe siècle: la poursuite di l’exhumation (1987–1996)’, 129–201]
  • F. Delaméa: ‘La redécouverte du théâtre vivaldien: état des lieux et perspectives’, ISV, vol.19 (1998), 45–73
  • E. Careri: ‘Sulla ripresa moderna del melodramma italiano del primo ’700. Il caso de “La verità in cimento” di Antonio Vivaldi’, SV, vol.2 (2002), 75–96
  • C. Fertonani: ‘Il gusto del paradosso: a proposito di Vivaldiana di Gian Francesco Malipiero’, Antonio Vivaldi: Passato e futuro: Venice 2007, 395–412
  • F. Delaméa: ‘Vivaldi in scena: Thoughts on the Revival of Vivaldi’s Operas’, Vivaldi, ‘Motezuma’ and the Opera Seria: Essays on a Newly Discovered Work and its Background, ed. M. Talbot (Turnhout, 2008), 169–85
  • M. Zerbi: Un fiume di musica: Antonio Vivaldi alle origini di una riscoperta, Saggi vivaldiani, 2 (Venice, 2016)
S. Discography
  • R.-C. Travers: ‘La redécouverte de Vivaldi par le disque, de 1950 à 1978’, Vivaldi veneziano europeo: Venice 1978, 333–46
  • L. Bellingardi: ‘Discografia di Antonio Vivaldi’, NRMI, vol.13 (1979), 290–304
  • R.-C. Travers: ‘Discographie Vivaldi’, ISV (1980–2000), SV (2001–) [ongoing series of reports in almost every issue]
  • R.-C. Travers and T. Walker: ‘Discographie Vivaldi 78 tours’, ISV, vol.3 (1982), 74–97
  • R.-C. Travers: ‘Nouvelles informations sur la discographie Vivaldi 78 tours’, ISV, vol.4 (1983), 98–100
  • L.T. Billiet: La redécouverte de Vivaldi par le disque (diss., U. Libre de Bruxelles, 1984)
  • R.-C. Travers: ‘Le temps du monaural: 1948–1959: Premier âge d’or méconnu du disque vivaldien’, Fulgeat sol frontis decorae: Studi in onore di Michael Talbot, Saggi vivaldiani, 1, ed. A. Borin and J. Cameron (Venice, 2016), 235–306
T. Vivaldi and Bach
  • J.N. Forkel: Über Johann Sebastian Bachs Leben, Kunst und Kunstwerke (Leipzig, 1802/R), 23–4
  • C.L. Hilgenfeldt: Johann Sebastian Bach’s Leben, Wirken und Werke (Leipzig, 1850), 128
  • J. Rühlmann: ‘Antonio Vivaldi und sein Einfluss auf Johann Sebastian Bach’, NZM, vol.63 (1867), 393–7, 401–5, 413–16
  • P. Waldersee: ‘Antonio Vivaldis Violinconcerte unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der von Johann Sebastian Bach bearbeiteten’, VMw, vol.1 (1885), 356–80
  • A. Schering: ‘Zur Bach-Forschung’, SIMG, vol.4 (1902–3), 234–43
  • M. Schneider: ‘Das sogenannte “Orgelkonzert d-moll von Wilhelm Friedemann Bach”’, BJb 1911, 23–36
  • R. Eller: ‘Zur Frage Bach-Vivaldi’, GfMKB: Hamburg 1956, 80–85
  • R. Eller: ‘Vivaldi-Dresden-Bach’, BMw, vol.3/4 (1961), 31–48
  • P. Ryom: ‘La comparaison entre les versions différentes d’un concerto d’Antonio Vivaldi transcrit par J.S. Bach’, DAM, vol.5 (1966–7), 91–111
  • H.-G. Klein: Der Einfluss der Vivaldischen Konzertform im Instrumentalwerk Johann Sebastian Bachs (Baden-Baden, 1970)
  • J.T. Igoe: ‘Bachs Bearbeitungen für Cembalo solo: eine Zusammenfassung’, BJb 1971, 91–7
  • H.-J. Schulze: ‘J.S. Bach’s Concerto-Arrangements for Organ: Studies or Commissioned Works?’, Organ Yearbook, vol.3 (1972), 4–13
  • R. Eller: ‘Vivaldi and Bach’, Vivaldi veneziano europeo: Venice 1978, 55–66
  • H.-J. Schulze: ‘Neue Ermittlungen zu J.S. Bachs Vivaldi-Bearbeitungen’, Vivaldi-Studien: Dresden 1978, 32–41
  • W. Kolneder: ‘Vivaldi in der Polemik Schreyer-Spitta’, Nuovi studi vivaldiani: Venice 1987, 33–44
  • C. Wolff: ‘Vivaldi’s Compositional Art and the Process of “Musical Thinking”’, Nuovi studi vivaldiani: Venice 1987, 1–17
  • D.E. Freeman: ‘J.S. Bach’s “Concerto” Arias: a Study in the Amalgamation of Eighteenth-Century Genres’, Studi musicali, vol.27 (1998), 123–62
  • C. Fertonani: ‘Ancora su Vivaldi e Bach: Una traccia della “Primavera” nella cantata “Wer weiß, wie nahe mir mein ende”, bwv27’, Fulgeat sol frontis decorae: Studi in onore di Michael Talbot, Saggi vivaldiani, 1, ed. A. Borin and J. Cameron (Venice, 2016), 115–27
Musical Times
Österreichische Musikzeitschrift
Analecta musicologica
Nuova rivista musicale italiana
J. Hawkins: A General History of the Science and Practice of Music (London, 1776)
E. Schmitz: Geschichte der weltlichen Solokantate (Leipzig, 1914, 2/1955)
D.D. Boyden: A History of Violin Playing from its Origins to 1761 (London, 1965)
Proceedings of the Royal Musical Association
Galpin Society Journal
Deutsches Jahrbuch der Musikwissenschaft
A.-E. Choron and F.J.M. Fayolle: Dictionnaire historique des musiciens
Journal of the Royal Musical Association
Acta musicologica
Early Music
Bach-Jahrbuch
Drammaturgia musicale veneta (Milan, 1983-)
Vierteljahrsschrift für Musikwissenschaft
W.S. Newman: The Sonata in the Baroque Era (Chapel Hill, NC, 1959, 4/1983)
A. Schering: Geschichte des Instrumental-Konzerts (Leipzig, 1905, 2/1927/R)
Rivista italiana di musicologia
Music & Letters
Dansk aarbog for musikforskning
Musical Quarterly
Sammelbände der Internationalen Musik-Gesellschaft
Beiträge zur Musikwissenschaft
Archiv für Musikwissenschaft
Rassegna musicale
Journal of the American Musicological Society