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Article

Jonathan Powell

Obouhow, Nicolas [ Obukhov, Nikolay ] ( b Ol′shanka, Kursk province , 10 / April 22, 1892 ; d St Cloud, nr Paris , June 13, 1954 ). Russian composer . He studied for a while at the Moscow Conservatory from 1911 (counterpoint with Il′insky and the piano with Strakhov) before entering the St Petersburg Conservatory in 1913 , where he studied with Kalafati, Maksimilian Steinberg and Nikolay Tcherepnin. His first acknowledged works date from 1913 : these include the songs published as Quatre mélodies by Rouart et Lerolle in Paris in 1921

Article

Rita McAllister and Iosif Genrikhovich Rayskin

the conservatory failed, so it was not until after his graduation in 1912 that, encouraged by Glazunov, he became a full-time music student. At the St Petersburg Conservatory ( 1913–18 ) he studied composition with Sokolov, orchestration with Steinberg and score-reading with Nikolay Tcherepnin. His compositional style was thus formed in the nationalist tradition, and, more particularly, within the school of Rimsky-Korsakov. After graduating from the conservatory Shaporin became actively involved in the progressive artistic life of Petrograd: he allied himself with

Article

Genrikh Orlov and Lyudmila Kovnatskaya

Warsaw, and completed his studies there in 1906 . He then studied in the faculty of history and philology and in the faculty of law at the St Petersburg University ( 1906–10 ); he also graduated from the composition classes of Lyadov (fugue), Kalafati (harmony), Vītols (form), Nikolay Tcherepnin (score reading) and Steinberg (orchestration) at the St Petersburg Conservatory ( 1908–14 ). At this time, he showed an interest in the artistic association Mir iskusstva , and met its members; he later ( 1911–12 ) worked as a pianist with Diaghilev’s company, being accepted

Article

conscientious editorial work: he unearthed and completed the Overture-Symphony on Russian Themes by Glinka ( 1937 ), and produced the best existing version of Musorgsky’s unfinished opera Sorochintsy Fair ( 1931–2 ), superseding previous restorations by Lyadov, Cui, Sakhnovsky and Nikolay Tcherepnin. Works ( selective list ) Stage Solntse nad step′yu [The Sun over the Steppes] (op, 3, Ya. Galitsky), op.27, 1939–59, Moscow, The Actors’ House, 9 June 1958 Zhenikh iz posol′stva [The Bridegroom from the Embassy] (musical comedy, 3, V. Ardov), 1941–2

Article

they once had shared. Though remaining close to Stasov and Borodin, he formed new friendships, in the wake of Boris , with the singers, medical men, actors, writers and artists who frequented the Maly Yaroslavets restaurant in St Petersburg, an establishment characterized by Nikolay Tcherepnin as ‘the favourite place of the leading figures in Petersburg's world of the arts’. The effects of alcoholism had yet to show themselves, but he was increasingly unable to resist drinking. He made steady progress with Khovanshchina between August 1875 and August 1876 , during

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Melik-Pashayev, Aleksandr Shamil′yevich ( b Tbilisi , 10 / Oct 23, 1905 ; d Moscow , June 18, 1964 ). Georgian conductor and composer . He studied with Nikolay Tcherepnin at the Tbilisi Conservatory and then became pianist and leader of the orchestra at the Tbilisi Opera from 1921 , and conductor from 1924 . He studied conducting with Aleksandr Gauk at Leningrad Conservatory ( 1928–30 ) and returned to Tbilisi in 1930 as chief conductor. From 1931 he was conductor, and from 1953 chief conductor, at the Bol′shoy Theatre in

Article

I.M. Yampol′sky

Gauk, Aleksandr Vasil′yevich ( b Odessa , 3 / Aug 15, 1893 ; d Moscow , March 30, 1963 ). Ukrainian conductor and composer . After studying at the Petrograd (St Petersburg) Conservatory with Glazunov (composition) and Nikolay Tcherepnin (conducting), he became conductor at the Petrograd Music Drama Theatre ( 1917 ), and at the State Opera and Ballet Theatre, now the Kirov ( 1923–31 ). He was then chief conductor successively of the Leningrad PO, 1930–34 , of the USSR State SO in Moscow, 1936–41 , and of the All-Union RSO, 1953–63 . During

Article

Zygmunt M. Szweykowski

education under Max Reger (composition), Arthur Nikisch and Hans Sitt (conducting) at the Leipzig Conservatory, at the same time studying musicology at the university with Hugo Riemann and Arnold Schering ( 1913–14 ). He completed his study of conducting and composition with Nikolay Tcherepnin, Aleksandr Glazunov and Maximilian Steinberg at the Petrograd Conservatory ( 1914–15 ) and stayed in Russia (Petrograd, Kiev) as conductor and music critic until 1918 , when he returned to Poland. He lived in Warsaw until 1939 , dividing his time between his profession as a

Article

Jonathan Powell and Christopher Hepburn

(b Obolsunovo, Ivanovo region, March 9, 1888; d nr Logachyovo, Smolensk region, Oct 6, 1914). Russian composer and pianist. He composed and performed his first compositions at the age of six, being initially taught by his mother. In 1892 the factory at which his father laboured as a chemical engineer closed and the family was forced to move. In ...

Article

Leningrad , Oct 25, 1953 ). Russian composer . He came from a poor Jewish background and was orphaned at the age of 12. From his childhood he sang in synagogue choirs. In 1915 he graduated from the Petrograd Conservatory where he studied composition with Lyadov, Steinberg and Nikolay Tcherepnin. From 1911 he took an active part in the Society for Jewish Folk Music in St Petersburg, directing the choir. After the Revolution he was involved in music and teaching; he was later chorusmaster of Prolekul′t ( 1921–4 ) and of the opera theatre of the People's House in Petrograd

Article

James M. Burk and Wayne J. Schneider

Moiseyevich ) [ Lynn, Frank ] ( b Kharkiv , Aug 31, 1895 ; d New York , March 23, 1943 ). Russian theorist and composer , naturalized American . He studied composition and conducting at the St Petersburg Conservatory ( 1914–18 ), where his teachers included Nikolay Tcherepnin, and also trained in mathematics. After the completion of his studies, he began a successful career in Kharkiv, Moscow and Leningrad (now St Petersburg) as a teacher, administrator and conductor. He conducted the Ukrainian SO ( 1920–21 ), served as composer for the State Academic

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Dranishnikov, Vladimir Alexandrovich ( b St Petersburg , 29 May / June 10, 1893 ; d Kiev , Feb 6, 1939 ). Russian conductor and composer . He studied at the St Petersburg Conservatory with Lyadov and Shteynberg (composition) and Nikolay Tcherepnin (conducting). Having led the orchestra at the Mariinsky Theatre he was conductor from 1918 , and music director from 1925 to 1936 . A talented opera conductor, he achieved a sensitive integration of voices and orchestra to dramatic as well as musical purpose. Under his direction the theatre

Article

Arthur Jacobs

, March 14, 1887 ; d Killin, Perthshire , Dec 19, 1982 ). English conductor and composer . He was a choirboy at Westminster Abbey, organ scholar at Exeter College, Oxford ( 1908–12 ), and then a student at the St Petersburg Conservatory, where his teachers included Nikolay Tcherepnin and Maximilian Steinberg. He graduated in 1917 and after military service in Britain returned to Petrograd as an assistant to Albert Coates, at that time a conductor at the Mariinsky Theatre. In 1920 , back in London, he joined the music staff at the Old Vic, which at that

Article

Susana Salgado

son, he began violin lessons at the age of nine with Stolyarsky and later studied with M.T. Hait. He continued violin studies with Sergei Korguyev and Auer at the St Petersburg Conservatory ( 1912–17 ); among his other teachers were Vasily Kalafati, Maximilian Steinberg, Nikolay Tcherepnin and Nikolay Sokolov. In 1919 he won by competition the post of leader of the Petrograd State Academic Theatre orchestra, but he did not take up the appointment. In 1923 he settled in Buenos Aires, where in 1929 he was a founder-member of the Grupo Renovación, devoted to studying

Article

Dorothea Redepenning

he took courses to train as a concert pianist, changing from Alexander Winkler to the highly regarded Anna Yesipova, the teacher of many outstanding Russian pianists. At the same time he began to study conducting with Nikolay Tcherepnin, the only lecturer at the conservatory whom he took really seriously; he also respected him as an analyst. Tcherepnin even taught him, he said, to appreciate the orchestral sound of Haydn and Mozart. He took his examinations in both these practical disciplines in the spring of 1914 . For the piano examination he played his own First

Article

Stephen Walsh

typically, exotically Russian fairy tale he or his collaborators could think of, Zhar′-ptitsa (‘The Firebird’). The process by which this commission eventually reached the largely untried Stravinsky is still obscure (it certainly came by way of Diaghilev's resident composer, Nikolay Tcherepnin, and Lyadov, and possibly also Stravinsky's old counterpoint teacher Akimenko). Diaghilev's telegram, indeed, was no more than a sounding-out, and the commission was probably only confirmed in early December. By that time Stravinsky had already sketched some music, and may even

Article

Maria Eckhardt, Rena Charnin Mueller and Alan Walker

org); NLE i/17† intended as kbd work, but pubd in MW (1936) for chorus (source lost); see also J36 A295 197a 60a 1195 Toccata ?1879 NLE i/12† A296 207a 297 1212 Variation, prélude à la polka de Borodine 1880 Hamburg: Rahter, 1881 (rev.); Leipzig: Belaieff, 1893 (rev.); Bonn: in Tcherepnin paraphrase, 1959 (facs.) [NLE ii/15] variation on the ‘Chopsticks’ theme, composed for the 2nd edn of the set by Borodin, Cui, Lyadov and Rimsky-Korsakov; s 256 was renumbered as s 207a 256 297 1213 Variation über das Thema [Chopsticks] 1880 A297 573a 113/1 1215 Seconda mazurka