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(1) Nikolay (Nikolayevich) Tcherepnin See Tcherepnin family

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Maria Eckhardt, Rena Charnin Mueller and Alan Walker

work, but pubd in MW (1936) for chorus (source lost); see also J36 A295 197a 60a 1195 Toccata ?1879 NLE i/12† A296 207a 297 1212 Variation, prélude à la polka de Borodine 1880 Hamburg: Rahter, 1881 (rev.); Leipzig: Belaieff, 1893 (rev.); Bonn: in Tcherepnin paraphrase, 1959 (facs.) [NLE ii/15] variation on the ‘Chopsticks’ theme, composed for the 2nd edn of the set by Borodin, Cui, Lyadov and Rimsky-Korsakov; s 256 was renumbered as s 207a 256 297 1213 Variation über das Thema [Chopsticks] 1880 A297 573a

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Svetlana Savenko, Enrique Alberto Arias, Christopher Palmer, Barry Schrader and Joel Chadabe

[A study on Tcherepnin], Muzïka , no.250 (1916), 179–85 Yu. Shaporin : ‘Moi uchitelya’, SovM (1962), no.9, pp.96–7 O. Tompakova : ‘N.N. Cherepnin’, Muzïkal′naya zhizn′ (1974), no.1, pp.15–16 M. Bikhter : ‘Listki iz knigi vospominaniy: N.N. Cherepnin’ [Pages from my book of recollections], SovM (1959), no.9, pp.130–31 N. Tcherepnin : Vospominaniya muzïkanta [A musician’s reminiscences] (Leningrad, 1976) S. Prokof′yev : ‘Ob uchitelyakh’ [My teachers], Moskovskiy muzïkoved: yezhegodnik , 2 (1991), 5–10 O. Tompakova : Nikolay Nikolayevich

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Arthur Jacobs

Malko, Nikolai ( Andreyevich ) ( b Brailov , May 4, 1883 ; d Sydney , June 23, 1961 ). American conductor of Russian birth . A pupil of Rimsky-Korsakov, Lyadov, Glazunov and Nikolay Tcherepnin at the St Petersburg Conservatory, he also studied with Felix Mottl in Munich. Beginning as a conductor of ballet and opera at St Petersburg in 1903 , he became a leading musical figure of the early Soviet regime, conducting extensively and holding a professorship at the Moscow Conservatory ( 1918–25 ) and at the Leningrad Conservatory

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Dranishnikov, Vladimir Alexandrovich ( b St Petersburg , 29 May / June 10, 1893 ; d Kiev , Feb 6, 1939 ). Russian conductor and composer . He studied at the St Petersburg Conservatory with Lyadov and Shteynberg (composition) and Nikolay Tcherepnin (conducting). Having led the orchestra at the Mariinsky Theatre he was conductor from 1918 , and music director from 1925 to 1936 . A talented opera conductor, he achieved a sensitive integration of voices and orchestra to dramatic as well as musical purpose. Under his direction the theatre

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Melik-Pashayev, Aleksandr Shamil′yevich ( b Tbilisi , 10 / Oct 23, 1905 ; d Moscow , June 18, 1964 ). Georgian conductor and composer . He studied with Nikolay Tcherepnin at the Tbilisi Conservatory and then became pianist and leader of the orchestra at the Tbilisi Opera from 1921 , and conductor from 1924 . He studied conducting with Aleksandr Gauk at Leningrad Conservatory ( 1928–30 ) and returned to Tbilisi in 1930 as chief conductor. From 1931 he was conductor, and from 1953 chief conductor, at the Bol′shoy Theatre in

Article

Marina Pavlovna Rakhmanova

‘Chaykovskiy v samosoznanii Russkogo Zarubezh′ya 20-kh - 30-kh godov’ [Tchaikovsky in the consciousness of the Russian émigrés of the 1920s and 30s], P.I. Chaykovskiy: k 100-letiyu so dnya smerti (1893–1993) , ed. Ye.G. Sorokina (Moscow, 1995), 10–18 Aleksandr Cherepnin: dolgoye stranstviye [Tcherepnin: a long wandering] (Moscow, 1999) Amerikaniskiye dnevniki Artura Lur′ye: Keldïshevsky collection [American journal of A. Lur’ye], ed. S.G. Zvereva (Moscow, 1999) ‘Muzïkal′naya kul′tura russkogo varubezh′ya: na putyakh k okkrïtii′ [Musical culture of Russia

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I.M. Yampol′sky

Gauk, Aleksandr Vasil′yevich ( b Odessa , 3 / Aug 15, 1893 ; d Moscow , March 30, 1963 ). Ukrainian conductor and composer . After studying at the Petrograd (St Petersburg) Conservatory with Glazunov (composition) and Nikolay Tcherepnin (conducting), he became conductor at the Petrograd Music Drama Theatre ( 1917 ), and at the State Opera and Ballet Theatre, now the Kirov ( 1923–31 ). He was then chief conductor successively of the Leningrad PO, 1930–34 , of the USSR State SO in Moscow, 1936–41 , and of the All-Union RSO, 1953–63 . During

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Noël Goodwin

Kurtz, Efrem ( b St Petersburg , Nov 7, 1900 ; d London , June 27, 1995 ). American conductor of Russian birth . He studied with Nikolay Tcherepnin and Glazunov at the St Petersburg Conservatory; he then went to Riga University and the Stern Conservatory, Berlin. He made his début at Berlin in 1921 , deputizing for Nikisch at a dance programme given by Isadora Duncan. He became musical director of the Stuttgart Philharmonic, 1924–33 , and also toured with Anna Pavlova in Europe, Australia and South America during the three years before her death in

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Arthur Jacobs

, March 14, 1887 ; d Killin, Perthshire , Dec 19, 1982 ). English conductor and composer . He was a choirboy at Westminster Abbey, organ scholar at Exeter College, Oxford ( 1908–12 ), and then a student at the St Petersburg Conservatory, where his teachers included Nikolay Tcherepnin and Maximilian Steinberg. He graduated in 1917 and after military service in Britain returned to Petrograd as an assistant to Albert Coates, at that time a conductor at the Mariinsky Theatre. In 1920 , back in London, he joined the music staff at the Old Vic, which at that

Article

Zygmunt M. Szweykowski

education under Max Reger (composition), Arthur Nikisch and Hans Sitt (conducting) at the Leipzig Conservatory, at the same time studying musicology at the university with Hugo Riemann and Arnold Schering ( 1913–14 ). He completed his study of conducting and composition with Nikolay Tcherepnin, Aleksandr Glazunov and Maximilian Steinberg at the Petrograd Conservatory ( 1914–15 ) and stayed in Russia (Petrograd, Kiev) as conductor and music critic until 1918 , when he returned to Poland. He lived in Warsaw until 1939 , dividing his time between his profession as a

Article

Richard Beattie Davis

Aleksandr Porfir′yevich, §3: The Belyayev years Chamber music, §4(i): From 1800 to World War I: Concerts and repertory Glazunov, Aleksandr Konstantinovich Rimsky-Korsakov: (1) Nikolay Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov, §3: 1881–93 Russian musical life, role in St Petersburg, §2(i): 1800–1918: Concerts and music societies Skryabin, Aleksandr Nikolayevich, §1: Life, 1871–98 Tcherepnin: (1) Nikolay Tcherepnin

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Jonathan Powell and Christopher Hepburn

Loginova : ‘Uchitel i uchenik: Zhiliaev i Stanchinskii’ [Teacher and student: Zhiliaev and Stanchinsky], Zhiliaev: Proceedings, Days, and Death (Orenburg, 2008), 257–64 V.A. Loginova : Liki Serebrianogo beka: Vladimir Rebikov, Nikolai Cherepnin, Aleksei Stanchinskii: ychebnoe posobie [Faces of the silver age: Vladimir Rebikov, Nikolai Cherepnin, Aleksey Stanchinsky] (Orenburg, 2011) V.A. Loginova: ‘ Avtorskii stil’ Aleksei Vladimirovicha Stanchinskogo ’ [The author’s style: Aleksey Vladimirovich Stanchinsky], [Unpublished monograph in fragments], http://www.superinf

Article

James M. Burk and Wayne J. Schneider

Moiseyevich ) [ Lynn, Frank ] ( b Kharkiv , Aug 31, 1895 ; d New York , March 23, 1943 ). Russian theorist and composer , naturalized American . He studied composition and conducting at the St Petersburg Conservatory ( 1914–18 ), where his teachers included Nikolay Tcherepnin, and also trained in mathematics. After the completion of his studies, he began a successful career in Kharkiv, Moscow and Leningrad (now St Petersburg) as a teacher, administrator and conductor. He conducted the Ukrainian SO ( 1920–21 ), served as composer for the State Academic

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Leningrad , Oct 25, 1953 ). Russian composer . He came from a poor Jewish background and was orphaned at the age of 12. From his childhood he sang in synagogue choirs. In 1915 he graduated from the Petrograd Conservatory where he studied composition with Lyadov, Steinberg and Nikolay Tcherepnin. From 1911 he took an active part in the Society for Jewish Folk Music in St Petersburg, directing the choir. After the Revolution he was involved in music and teaching; he was later chorusmaster of Prolekul′t ( 1921–4 ) and of the opera theatre of the People's House in Petrograd

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Susana Salgado

son, he began violin lessons at the age of nine with Stolyarsky and later studied with M.T. Hait. He continued violin studies with Sergei Korguyev and Auer at the St Petersburg Conservatory ( 1912–17 ); among his other teachers were Vasily Kalafati, Maximilian Steinberg, Nikolay Tcherepnin and Nikolay Sokolov. In 1919 he won by competition the post of leader of the Petrograd State Academic Theatre orchestra, but he did not take up the appointment. In 1923 he settled in Buenos Aires, where in 1929 he was a founder-member of the Grupo Renovación, devoted to studying

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Richard Taruskin

little in the exuberantly decorative score that cannot be associated with the idiom of such older Rimsky-Korsakov pupils as Anatoly Lyadov and especially Nikolay Tcherepnin. Stravinsky dedicated the work to its librettist, Mitusov. When in 1909 Stravinsky began receiving commissions from Sergey Dyagilev, first for some Chopin orchestrations for the ballet Les sylphides and then (following Lyadov’s and Tcherepnin’s refusal) for The Firebird , he found himself sidetracked from his operatic project, and eventually turned cold not only to it but (under the influence

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Jonathan Powell

Obouhow, Nicolas [ Obukhov, Nikolay ] ( b Ol′shanka, Kursk province , 10 / April 22, 1892 ; d St Cloud, nr Paris , June 13, 1954 ). Russian composer . He studied for a while at the Moscow Conservatory from 1911 (counterpoint with Il′insky and the piano with Strakhov) before entering the St Petersburg Conservatory in 1913 , where he studied with Kalafati, Maksimilian Steinberg and Nikolay Tcherepnin. His first acknowledged works date from 1913 : these include the songs published as Quatre mélodies by Rouart et Lerolle in Paris in 1921

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first president of the Society of Russian Dramatists and Opera Composers, founded in Moscow in 1874 to protect authors’ and composers’ performing rights. Principal works set to music Bednost′ ne porok [Poverty is no Vice] (1854): Svat [The Matchmaker], op. by N.N. Tcherepnin, Paris, 1937 Ne tak zhivi kak khochetsya [Do Not live as you Like] (1855): Vrazh′ya sila [The Power of Evil], op by Serov, St Petersburg, 1871 Groza [The Storm; The Thunderstorm] (1860): Ov. op.76 by Tchaikovsky, 1864 op by Kashperov, 1867 Kát’a Kabanová, op by Janáček, Brno, 1921

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Richard Taruskin

Later, Sakhnovsky completed the work in continuous music, in which form it was given at the Bol’shoy Theatre, Moscow, under Nikolay Golovanov on 10 January 1925 . (2): completed and orchestrated by César Cui, 1915–16 , using Golenishchev-Kutuzov’s supplementary text; it was published in 1916 and given under Grzegorz Fitelberg at the Theatre of Musical Drama, St Petersburg, on 13/ 26 October 1917 . (3): as a pastiche, by Nikolay Tcherepnin, incorporating items from (1) and (2) with other music by Musorgsky; it was given at the Monte Carlo Opera House on 27 March