1-20 of 432 Results  for:

  • Chordophones (Stringed Instruments) x
Clear all

Article

Walter Knape and Murray R. Charters

revised by Simon McVeigh

German family of musicians. They originated from middle and north Germany and were noted chiefly as bass viol players, violinists and composers; some members of the family were painters and landscape gardeners. The spelling ‘Abell’ is often found, especially among the earlier members of the family, but there is no known relationship to the English composer John Abell (1650–1724). Nor has any relationship been established between them and a musical family of the same name originating in Löwenberg (Mark) and active in Grosswoltersdorf and Berlin, of whom the first musician was Georg Friedrich Abel (1755–1835); see Zachau: ‘Die Abel aus Löwenberg (Mark) und ihr musikalisches Erbgut’, Familie und Volk, v (1952), p.154.

The earliest known musician of the family was Heinrich Othmar Abel (bc1580; d after 1630), who is said to have served as town musician in Magdeburg and Brunswick about 1600; for religious reasons he went to Bremen, where he received the freedom of the city in 1615, and from about 1630 he was a musician at Schloss Hünnefeld near Osnabrück. His son Ernst Abel (b Bremen, c1610; d Bremen, 1680), a keyboard player, was a member of the chapel at Hanover from 1636 and a musician at the Celle court, 1650–56; from 1662 to his death he was a Bremen town musician....

Article

Walter Knape and Murray R. Charters

revised by Simon McVeigh

Member of Abel family

(b Cöthen, Dec 22, 1723; d London, June 20, 1787). German composer and bass viol player, son of Christian Ferdinand Abel. He was no doubt a pupil of his father’s, especially for the bass viol; but on his father’s death in 1737 Carl Friedrich may have turned to the former relationship with the Bach family and gone to Leipzig to study, as Burney, who knew Abel, stated. By 1743 Abel was a player in the court orchestra under Hasse in Dresden; the connection with the Bachs was maintained – W.F. Bach was an organist there until 1746, and J.S. Bach had held an appointment as court composer from 1736. Abel left Dresden in 1757–8 during the destruction of the city by Frederick the Great. He then travelled, visiting the house of Goethe’s family in Frankfurt and probably the musical centres of Mannheim and Paris. He had already begun to compose in Dresden; the Breitkopf catalogue of ...

Article

Walter Knape and Murray R. Charters

revised by Simon McVeigh

Member of Abel family

(b Hanover, c1683; d Cöthen, 1737). German bass viol player and violinist, youngest son of Clamor Heinrich Abel. As a young man he served with the troops of Charles XII of Sweden, then occupying north Germany and Bremen. He may have served at the Celle court before moving with his elder brother, the landscape gardener Johann Christoph, to join the establishment of Prince Leopold I of Anhalt-Cöthen about 1715. Christian Ferdinand was listed as chamber violinist and viol player when J.S. Bach was appointed Kapellmeister there in 1717; the two were soon good friends, and Bach stood as godfather to Abel’s first daughter (b 6 Jan 1720). Spitta supposed that Bach had written the six cello suites for Abel, but there is no indication that Abel played the cello, and the Cöthen chapel had a competent and highly paid cellist in Christian Bernhard Linike. Prince Leopold had a particular affection for the viol, and it is likely that Bach provided the three sonatas for bass viol and harpsichord for Abel to teach to the prince. Although Abel’s fortunes rose on Bach’s departure in ...

Article

Walter Knape and Murray R. Charters

revised by Simon McVeigh

Member of Abel family

(b Hünnefeld, 1634; d Bremen, July 25, 1696). German composer, organist and bass viol player, son of Ernst Abel. He served at Celle (1662–4) and then at Hanover, where he was court organist and viol player until 1685; possibly he then returned to Celle. His final appointment, in ...

Article

Walter Knape and Murray R. Charters

revised by Simon McVeigh

Member of Abel family

(b Cöthen, March 24, 1718; d Ludwigslust, Aug 25, 1794). German composer and violinist, eldest son of Christian Ferdinand Abel. He was a pupil of Franz Benda in Dresden (1735) and worked as a violinist in the court orchestras at Brunswick (1745) and Sonderhausen (1757–65). He was next appointed Konzertmeister in the orchestra at Brandenburg-Schwedt (1766), then with Benda in Berlin, and he was finally a first violinist in the chapel of the Prince of Mecklenburg-Schwerin in Ludwigslust from 1770. His compositions include a Symphony in D (1776; D-SWl , under ‘Leba’) and violin ‘arpeggien’ ( A-Wgm ). His two sons, August Christian Andreas (1751–1834) and Friedrich Ludwig Aemilius (b 1770), were both violinists at Ludwigslust; the latter’s grandson Ludwig (1835–95) was a violinist in Basle from 1865, and from ...

Article

Geoffrey Norris and Nigel Yandell

[Yevgeny Karlovich]

Member of Albrecht family

(b St Petersburg, July 4/16, 1842; d St Petersburg, Jan 28/Feb 9, 1894). German, active in Russia, instrumentalist, teacher, and administrator, son of Karl Albrecht. From 1857 to 1860 he studied at the Leipziger Konservatorium, where his principal teachers were Ferdinand David (violin), Moritz Hauptmann (composition), and Karl Brendel (history of music). He also studied briefly with Ignaz Moscheles, who was professor of piano at the Conservatory. In 1860 he was appointed violinist in the orchestra of the Italian Opera at St Petersburg and from 1862 to 1887 he played second violin in the quartet of the St Petersburg branch of the Russian Musical Society. He was well known as a music teacher, and taught several members of the imperial family; his elementary guides to violin and cello playing were published in 1871 and 1872 respectively. He helped to institute the St Petersburg Society for Quartet Music (...

Article

Geoffrey Norris and Nigel Yandell

(Karlovich)

Member of Albrecht family

(b St Petersburg, May 15/27, 1844; d Saratov, 1899). German, active in Russia, cellist, son of Karl Albrecht. He studied the cello with Carl Schuberth and Karl Davïdov at the St Petersburg Conservatory. After graduating in 1865, he moved to Moscow, where he taught at the Conservatory (...

Article

Barry S. Brook and Richard Viano

[Aldaye, Aldée]

French family of musicians. Considerable confusion surrounds the members of the Alday family, as several have the same first initial; both Grove5 and RISM have attributed many of the works of the various Aldays incorrectly. The first known musician in the family, Alday le père (first name unknown, b Perpignan, 1737), was a violin teacher and composer. According to Fétis's unsupported story, he learnt the mandolin in Italy while secretary to a grand seigneur, and was married in Avignon. Choron and Fayolle reported that he settled in Paris as a professor of the mandolin. His sons were François Alday l'aîné and Paul Alday le jeune.

Alday, François [l'aîné] (b Mahón, Menorca, c1761; d ?Lyons, after 1835)

Alday, (Jérôme) Paul (Bonaventure) [le jeune] (b Perpignan ? or Paris, c1763; d ? Dublin, 1835)

Alday, Francisque (b Lyons, c1800; d Lyons, after 1846)

Alday, Ferdinand...

Article

Barry S. Brook

revised by Richard Viano

Member of Alday family

(b Lyons, c1800; d Lyons, after 1846). French violinist and music director, second son of François Alday. A talented violinist, he performed at the Cercle Harmonique in 1818. He wrote Vingt-huit études pour le violon op.4 (Lyons, before 1825) and contributed significantly to the Grande méthode élémentaire pour le violon dédiée à leur père et composée par les fils Alday (Lyons, c1824), a work which is probably the Aldays' chief contribution to music history: it achieved widespread recognition, and was reprinted throughout the 19th century; as late as 1907 J.M. Bay, professor of violin at the Lyons Conservatoire, published in Lyons a Méthode de violon après la célèbre méthode des fils Alday. In 1828 and 1830 Francisque Alday played second and first violin, respectively, in the orchestra of the Grand Théâtre. Like his father, he was influential in the musical life of Lyons, assuming the directorship of its Société Philharmonique in ...

Article

Barry S. Brook

revised by Richard Viano

[l'aîné]

Member of Alday family

(b Mahón, Menorca, c1761; d ?Lyons, after 1835). French violinist, organist, teacher and music director. He was the older son of Alday père. The Alday name, presumably referring to François, first appeared in the Parisian press in 1771 after a performance at the Concert Spirituel: ‘M. Aldaye fils, âgé d'environ dix ans, a joué sur la mandoline avec autant de rapidité que de précision’ (Mercure de France, April 1771, ii, 182). He does not appear to have been an outstanding soloist; the name ‘Aldée’ is listed last in the second violin section of the Concert Spirituel in 1786, and probably refers to him rather than to his brother Paul. In 1797 he was a music teacher and ‘premier violon du spectacle’ in Lyons. In 1810 he founded the Cercle Harmonique, a concert society comprising the best musicians in that city. As its director, he played an important role in the musical life of Lyons; he encouraged the performance of contemporary music, including the first performance in that city of Beethoven’s ...

Article

Barry S. Brook

revised by Richard Viano

(Bonaventure)[le jeune]

Member of Alday family

(b Perpignan ? or Paris, c1763; d ? Dublin, 1835). French violinist and composer, brother of François Alday. He studied with Viotti in 1785 and between 1783 and 1790 performed no fewer than 25 times at the Concert Spirituel in his own works as well as those by J.A. Fodor, Giornovichi, Mestrino and Viotti. In 1789 he performed a symphonie concertante with ‘Vauthy’ (Viotti) in Lyons. Fétis placed Alday le jeune in England after 1791. His stay in London was apparently short: an account in Jackson's Oxford Journal announced that he performed in Oxford in May 1793. In the same year, he married a harpist ‘lately arrived from Paris’, Adélaïde Rosalie Delatouche (1768 or 1769–1835), in Oxford. He remained there until at least 1796, when he gave a benefit concert. Gerber placed him in Edinburgh in 1806 as a music director and professor of music. According to Carr (...

Article

M. Ullman, Barry Kernfeld, Gary Kennedy, and Steve Smith

[Patterson, Gary]

Member of Ali family

(b Philadelphia, May 4, 1956). American electric bass guitarist, son of Rashied Ali. He began to play drums at the age of seven and changed to electric bass guitar when he was 12. After briefly attending the Granoff School of Music in Philadelphia (1969–70) he received informal tuition from an uncle, Tyrone Hill. In 1974 he formed a funk band, Down to Earth, and in 1978 he moved to New York. There he met James “Blood” Ulmer, under whose leadership he worked from 1980 to 1997 in various ensembles, notably the Black Rock Revival Band and the Music Revelation Ensemble; they also played together in the cooperative group Phalanx. In addition Ali performed alongside the Belgian guitarist and saxophonist Marc Bogaerts in his father’s trio in Brussels (1986) and was a founding member of Doran, Studer, Minton, Bates & Ali Play the Music of Jimi Hendrix, in which he worked with Christy Doran, Fredy Studer, Phil Minton, and Django Bates; Bates was replaced after a short time by Tom Cora (...

Article

Article

John Lade

Member of Ancot family

(b Bruges, July 6, 1799; d Boulogne, June 5, 1829). Flemish composer, violinist and pianist, son of Jean Ancot. He studied with his father and appeared as a soloist on both the violin and the piano in 1811. His first concertos were composed about ...

Article

Francesco Bussi

Member of Andreoli family

(b Mirandola, Jan 9, 1862; d Modena, April 26, 1932). Italian pianist, violinist, conductor and composer, son of Evangelista Andreoli (i). He received his first musical instruction from his father, and from 1876 studied the organ with Polibio Fumagalli, the violin with G. Rampazzini and composition with Bazzini at the Milan Conservatory. He taught harmony, counterpoint and (from 1900) the piano at the conservatory, where his pupils included Victor De Sabata and Franco Vittadini. From 1878 to 1886 he took an active part in the Società dei Concerti Sinfonici Popolari and directed the concerts of the Società del Quartetto; he was a member of the Campanari Quartet for three years. His works include a Fantasia sinfonica and two overtures for orchestra, a requiem, a string quartet, short piano pieces, and songs. He also published Manuale d’armonia (with Edgardo Codazzi, Milan, 1898) and prepared editions of piano music of Beethoven, Chopin, Heller, Mendelssohn, Moscheles, Raff and Weber....

Article

Barry Kernfeld

[Lehrhaupt, William Anthony]

(b New York, March 28, 1930; d Las Vegas, Sept 13, 1961). American double bass player. His vital records are documented in the New York Birth Index, a Nevada death certificate, and a family tree. Anthony was raised in Long Branch and Asbury Park, New Jersey. He worked with Georgie Auld (1951), Jimmy Dorsey (1953), Gerry Mulligan (1954), and Claude Thornhill (1956) and performed and recorded with Buddy DeFranco (1950–51), Charlie Spivak (1952), and Stan Getz (1954–5). He also recorded with Bob Brookmeyer (1954), John Williams (ii) (1954–5), Tony Fruscella (1955), and Zoot Sims (1956). In 1958 he began working in Las Vegas. His creative rhythm playing is well represented by We’ll be together again, on Stan Getz at the Shrine Auditorium (1954, Norg. 2000...

Article

Mikaela Minga

(b Tirana, Albania, April 12, 1949; d Tirana, Sept 28, 2012). Albanian cellist. His parents were acclaimed artists. His father, Kristaq Antoniu, was a singer, actor, and stage director. His mother, Androniqi Zengo, was a painter. Between 1967 and 1973 Antoniu completed his cello studies at the Albanian Higher Institute of Arts (Instituti i Lartë i Arteve), with Y. Skënderi and M. Denizi. During this time he became one of the most acclaimed cello soloists in Albania of both chamber music and solo works, being the first performer of pieces by Albanian composers such as Ç. Zadeja, F. Ibrahimi, K. Laro, S. Kushta, T. Gaqi, and A. Peçi,. Antoniu gave numerous concerts, primarily in Albania, though a few abroad. He participated in the most important musical events of his time and made radio recordings. In his repertory are included cello pieces from Classic and Romantic European composers. Antoniu was appointed professor at the High Institute of Arts and taught there for more than thirty years....

Article

Eric Thacker

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(b Prague, April 13, 1934; d New York, May 13, 2017). Czech double bass player. He first studied violin and trombone (1945–52), then double bass and theory (1957), in the interim earning a degree in mechanical engineering at České vysoké učení technické v Prazehe (Czech Technical University in Prague). In the early to mid-1960s he recorded many albums in Prague with Zdenek Bartak’s big band, Karel Vlach (1962–3), Karel Velebný’s quartet and quintet (1962–5), Jan Konopasek (1963), and the pianist Milan Dvořák (1964). In 1965 he toured with the Reduta Quintet and as director of the Czechoslovak National Jazz Orchestra, and played with Leo Wright and Booker Ervin in West Germany and France. Arnet smuggled his wife, hidden in a bass drum, and his daughter, in a suitcase, through Checkpoint Charlie in Berlin; their story is the subject of the television documentary ...

Article

Brian W. Pritchard

Member of Ashley family

(b London, Dec 30, 1772; d Margate, Aug 28, 1843). English cellist, son of John Ashley. He appeared as soloist at Ranelagh, in his father’s and brother’s festivals and at major music meetings throughout the country. He was one of the founders of the Glee Club (1793), a member of the Royal Society of Musicians from 1794 and its secretary during the period 1811–19, and an original member of the Philharmonic Society (1813). He performed at the Concerts of Ancient Music and belonged to the orchestra at the King’s Theatre. He was sole manager of the Covent Garden Oratorios from 1816 to 1819 when the family’s long connection ended, and continued promoting festivals in the provinces after the deaths of his elder brothers, running a particularly extensive series late in 1818. As a cellist he was often considered second only to Robert Lindley and was renowned for his playing of obbligatos in arias such as ‘O liberty’ (...

Article

Brian W. Pritchard

Member of Ashley family

(b London, Nov 6, 1769; d London, Aug 21, 1818). English violinist, son of John Ashley. He studied the violin with Felice Giardini and F.-H. Barthélemon and was apprentice to his father from 1784 to 1791. A second violin player at the 1784 Handel Commemoration, he led the orchestra at his father’s musical festivals, first appearing in that role at Derby in 1790. His 25-year tenure as leader at the Covent Garden Oratorios began that same year. After his father’s death he jointly managed that enterprise with John James Ashley. These two brothers were also the mainstays of the festivals the family continued to promote in the provinces between 1806 and 1815.

Ashley was elected to the Royal Society of Musicians in 1791 and was engaged at Ranelagh and the Concerts of Ancient Music. He gained a considerable reputation in the performance of ‘ancient and sacred music’. His concerto repertory, regularly aired at the Oratorios, was conservative. It included Geminiani, Giardini, Avison and Giornovichi and, occasionally, works of his own composition....