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Christina Bashford

(Manning)

Member of Blagrove family

(b Nottingham, April 1, 1813; d London, Nov 1, 1858). English violinist and music publisher, brother of Henry Blagrove. He played the violin and viola in several London orchestras, appeared in the Quartett Concerts and other chamber music series, and wrote a few lightweight violin pieces. He was also active as a music publisher from ...

Article

Philip J. Kass

(b New York, NY, May 29, 1877; d Chicago, IL, May 9, 1955). American writer, publisher, and expert on violins. He studied violin and viola as a boy, and from 1893 to 1926 he worked for John Friedrich & Brother in New York as secretary, treasurer, purchaser, writer of catalogs, and publicity manager. From 1926 to 1937 he was with the Rudolph Wurlitzer Co., working first as assistant to the violin expert J.C. Freeman in New York and later as manager of the violin department in the Chicago store. He prepared catalogs for the company, including a famous one of 1931 that listed an enormous collection of violins and had a separate section devoted entirely to bows. In 1937 he opened his own shop in Evanston, Illinois, and began publishing a magazine, Violins. In 1941 his business was bought by the Chicago firm William Lewis & Son, with whom he worked as a salesman and magazine editor until his death....

Article

Jean Harden and Richard Macnutt

[Le Duc]

French family of musicians, composers, and music publishers. The origins of the family are unclear, but musicians of this name lived in Paris at the beginning of the 17th century and probably earlier, in the neighbourhood where the Leduc publishing house has remained. A Pierre Le Duc, maker of musical instruments, lived in the rue St-Honoré from 1602 and died childless in about 1635. His relationship to other Leducs is unknown. (See also Leduc, Alphonse.)

Leduc, Simon [l’aîné] (b Paris, Jan 15, 1742; d Paris, Jan 1777)

Leduc, Pierre [le jeune] (b Paris, Oct 17, 1755; d Bordeaux, Oct 18, 1826)

Leduc, (Antoine-Pierre) Auguste (b Paris, 1779; d Paris, May 25, 1823)

BrookSF; DEMF; HopkinsonD; JohanssonFMP; La LaurencieEF; MGG1 (R. Cotte); PierreHB.S. Brook: ‘Simon Le Duc l’aîné, a French Symphonist at the Time of Mozart’, ...

Article

Jean Harden

[le jeune]

Member of Leduc family

(b Paris, Oct 17, 1755; d Bordeaux, Oct 18, 1826). French violinist, publisher, and seller of musical instruments, brother of Simon Leduc. He made his début as a violin soloist at the Concert Spirituel in the spring of 1770 and appeared frequently thereafter, receiving consistently favourable reviews. He studied with his brother Simon, whose works made up the bulk of Pierre’s concert repertory. The brothers sometimes appeared together, on which occasions Simon yielded the first violin part to Pierre.

In March 1775 Leduc first advertised as a publisher, not as his brother’s partner but as an independent businessman. (Although Simon had published works under the Leduc name, these were exclusively his own.) Pierre published works by contemporary composers and thus founded the Leduc publishing house as an enduring enterprise. In 1782 Pierre enlarged his firm by acquiring the stock of Preudhomme and in 1784...

Article

Jean Harden

[l’aîné]

Member of Leduc family

(b Paris, Jan 15, 1742; d Paris, Jan 1777). French violinist, composer, and publisher. A pupil of Gaviniès, he was a second violinist in the Concert Spirituel orchestra in 1759 and made his début as soloist in 1763. In 1763 he was one of the first violins in the Concert Spirituel orchestra, and he continued to appear as an orchestral player and soloist until his death. He earned consistently favourable reviews in the Parisian press and received an understated compliment in Leopold Mozart’s travel diary of 1763–4: ‘He plays well’.

Despite his success, however, Leduc decided to devote the greater part of his efforts to pursuits other than virtuoso performance. He took great care in teaching his brother Pierre, whom he apparently considered a greater violinist than himself. He composed exceptionally fine orchestral and chamber music, publishing some of it under a privilege granted on ...

Article

Charles K. Wolfe

(b nr West Monroe, LA, Aug 8, 1921; d Nashville, TN, Feb 24, 1991). American country-music singer, guitarist, songwriter, and publisher. He performed as a guitarist on radio station KMLB (Monroe, LA) before 1950, when he joined the “Louisiana hayride ” on KWKH (Shreveport, LA). Recording contracts with the local Pacemaker label (c1950), Four-Star, and Decca (1951) allowed him to resign his part-time job as a clerk at Sears, Roebuck and concentrate on music. After his initial hit, “Wondering” (1952), he gained national attention with “Back Street Affair” (1952), one of the first country songs to deal forthrightly with adultery. An equally important landmark was “There stands the glass” (1953), a classic drinking song and the first country hit to use the pedal steel guitar, played by Bud Isaacs. It became the favorite backup instrument in country music for the next two decades, and Pierce was the first of many country singers whose slurs, octave jumps, and use of dynamics complemented its sound. During his peak years (...

Article

Cecil Hill

(Anton)

Member of Ries family

(b Bonn, Nov 10, 1755; d Godesberg, Nov 1, 1846). German violinist, son of Johann Ries. He was a child prodigy on the violin, being taught by J.P. Salomon, and was able to take his father’s place in the orchestra at the age of 11. In 1779 he visited Vienna, enjoying a great success as a solo violinist and quartet player. Rather than settle there, he chose to stay at Bonn on a poor salary. There he taught Beethoven and remained very close to the family, especially during the difficult years after the death of Beethoven’s mother. He received an appointment from Elector Maximilian on May 2, 1779.

When the French dissolved the electoral court in 1794, Franz Anton remained in Bonn. He was promised a post in the court after the invasion, but when that came to nothing he was obliged to earn a meagre living from various minor positions and some violin teaching. He received the Order of the Red Eagle and an honorary doctorate from Bonn University. He was present at the unveiling of Beethoven’s statue in ...

Article

Cecil Hill

Member of Ries family

(b Berlin, April 7, 1846; d Naumburg, Jan 20, 1932). German violinist and music publisher, youngest son of Hubert Ries. He studied the violin with his father and with Massart and Vieuxtemps in Paris. In 1870 he appeared at the Crystal Palace, but a promising career as a violinist was cut short in ...