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Article

Walter Knape and Murray R. Charters

revised by Simon McVeigh

German family of musicians. They originated from middle and north Germany and were noted chiefly as bass viol players, violinists and composers; some members of the family were painters and landscape gardeners. The spelling ‘Abell’ is often found, especially among the earlier members of the family, but there is no known relationship to the English composer John Abell (1650–1724). Nor has any relationship been established between them and a musical family of the same name originating in Löwenberg (Mark) and active in Grosswoltersdorf and Berlin, of whom the first musician was Georg Friedrich Abel (1755–1835); see Zachau: ‘Die Abel aus Löwenberg (Mark) und ihr musikalisches Erbgut’, Familie und Volk, v (1952), p.154.

The earliest known musician of the family was Heinrich Othmar Abel (bc1580; d after 1630), who is said to have served as town musician in Magdeburg and Brunswick about 1600; for religious reasons he went to Bremen, where he received the freedom of the city in 1615, and from about 1630 he was a musician at Schloss Hünnefeld near Osnabrück. His son Ernst Abel (b Bremen, c1610; d Bremen, 1680), a keyboard player, was a member of the chapel at Hanover from 1636 and a musician at the Celle court, 1650–56; from 1662 to his death he was a Bremen town musician....

Article

Walter Knape and Murray R. Charters

revised by Simon McVeigh

Member of Abel family

(b Cöthen, Dec 22, 1723; d London, June 20, 1787). German composer and bass viol player, son of Christian Ferdinand Abel. He was no doubt a pupil of his father’s, especially for the bass viol; but on his father’s death in 1737 Carl Friedrich may have turned to the former relationship with the Bach family and gone to Leipzig to study, as Burney, who knew Abel, stated. By 1743 Abel was a player in the court orchestra under Hasse in Dresden; the connection with the Bachs was maintained – W.F. Bach was an organist there until 1746, and J.S. Bach had held an appointment as court composer from 1736. Abel left Dresden in 1757–8 during the destruction of the city by Frederick the Great. He then travelled, visiting the house of Goethe’s family in Frankfurt and probably the musical centres of Mannheim and Paris. He had already begun to compose in Dresden; the Breitkopf catalogue of ...

Article

Walter Knape and Murray R. Charters

revised by Simon McVeigh

Member of Abel family

(b Hünnefeld, 1634; d Bremen, July 25, 1696). German composer, organist and bass viol player, son of Ernst Abel. He served at Celle (1662–4) and then at Hanover, where he was court organist and viol player until 1685; possibly he then returned to Celle. His final appointment, in ...

Article

Walter Knape and Murray R. Charters

revised by Simon McVeigh

Member of Abel family

(b Cöthen, March 24, 1718; d Ludwigslust, Aug 25, 1794). German composer and violinist, eldest son of Christian Ferdinand Abel. He was a pupil of Franz Benda in Dresden (1735) and worked as a violinist in the court orchestras at Brunswick (1745) and Sonderhausen (1757–65). He was next appointed Konzertmeister in the orchestra at Brandenburg-Schwedt (1766), then with Benda in Berlin, and he was finally a first violinist in the chapel of the Prince of Mecklenburg-Schwerin in Ludwigslust from 1770. His compositions include a Symphony in D (1776; D-SWl , under ‘Leba’) and violin ‘arpeggien’ ( A-Wgm ). His two sons, August Christian Andreas (1751–1834) and Friedrich Ludwig Aemilius (b 1770), were both violinists at Ludwigslust; the latter’s grandson Ludwig (1835–95) was a violinist in Basle from 1865, and from ...

Article

Barry S. Brook and Richard Viano

[Aldaye, Aldée]

French family of musicians. Considerable confusion surrounds the members of the Alday family, as several have the same first initial; both Grove5 and RISM have attributed many of the works of the various Aldays incorrectly. The first known musician in the family, Alday le père (first name unknown, b Perpignan, 1737), was a violin teacher and composer. According to Fétis's unsupported story, he learnt the mandolin in Italy while secretary to a grand seigneur, and was married in Avignon. Choron and Fayolle reported that he settled in Paris as a professor of the mandolin. His sons were François Alday l'aîné and Paul Alday le jeune.

Alday, François [l'aîné] (b Mahón, Menorca, c1761; d ?Lyons, after 1835)

Alday, (Jérôme) Paul (Bonaventure) [le jeune] (b Perpignan ? or Paris, c1763; d ? Dublin, 1835)

Alday, Francisque (b Lyons, c1800; d Lyons, after 1846)

Alday, Ferdinand...

Article

Barry S. Brook

revised by Richard Viano

(Bonaventure)[le jeune]

Member of Alday family

(b Perpignan ? or Paris, c1763; d ? Dublin, 1835). French violinist and composer, brother of François Alday. He studied with Viotti in 1785 and between 1783 and 1790 performed no fewer than 25 times at the Concert Spirituel in his own works as well as those by J.A. Fodor, Giornovichi, Mestrino and Viotti. In 1789 he performed a symphonie concertante with ‘Vauthy’ (Viotti) in Lyons. Fétis placed Alday le jeune in England after 1791. His stay in London was apparently short: an account in Jackson's Oxford Journal announced that he performed in Oxford in May 1793. In the same year, he married a harpist ‘lately arrived from Paris’, Adélaïde Rosalie Delatouche (1768 or 1769–1835), in Oxford. He remained there until at least 1796, when he gave a benefit concert. Gerber placed him in Edinburgh in 1806 as a music director and professor of music. According to Carr (...

Article

Article

John Lade

Member of Ancot family

(b Bruges, July 6, 1799; d Boulogne, June 5, 1829). Flemish composer, violinist and pianist, son of Jean Ancot. He studied with his father and appeared as a soloist on both the violin and the piano in 1811. His first concertos were composed about ...

Article

Francesco Bussi

Member of Andreoli family

(b Mirandola, Jan 9, 1862; d Modena, April 26, 1932). Italian pianist, violinist, conductor and composer, son of Evangelista Andreoli (i). He received his first musical instruction from his father, and from 1876 studied the organ with Polibio Fumagalli, the violin with G. Rampazzini and composition with Bazzini at the Milan Conservatory. He taught harmony, counterpoint and (from 1900) the piano at the conservatory, where his pupils included Victor De Sabata and Franco Vittadini. From 1878 to 1886 he took an active part in the Società dei Concerti Sinfonici Popolari and directed the concerts of the Società del Quartetto; he was a member of the Campanari Quartet for three years. His works include a Fantasia sinfonica and two overtures for orchestra, a requiem, a string quartet, short piano pieces, and songs. He also published Manuale d’armonia (with Edgardo Codazzi, Milan, 1898) and prepared editions of piano music of Beethoven, Chopin, Heller, Mendelssohn, Moscheles, Raff and Weber....

Article

Elizabeth Keitel

revised by Marc Signorile

French family of violinists and composers. They were active in Paris during the 18th century.

Aubert, Jacques [le vieux, le père] (b Paris, Sept 30, 1689; d Belleville, nr Paris, 17/May 18, 1753)

Aubert, Louis [le jeune, le fils] (i) (b Paris, May 15, 1720; d after 1783)

Aubert, Jean-Louis (b Paris, Dec 15, 1732; d c1810)

BenoitMCBrookSFLabordeMPLa LaurencieEFNewmanSBEL. de La Laurencie: ‘Jacques Aubert et les premiers concertos français de violon’, BSIM, 2/1 (1906), 441–53L. de La Laurencie and G. de Saint-Foix: ‘Contribution à l’histoire de la symphonie française vers 1750’, Année musicale (1911), 1–123C.D. Brenner: A Bibliographical List of Plays in the French Language, 1700–1789 (Berkeley, 1947, 2/1979)J.-F. Paillard: ‘Les premiers concertos français pour instruments à vent’, ReM, no.226 (1955), 144–62H. Brofsky: ‘Notes on the Early French Concerto’, ...

Article

Elizabeth Keitel

revised by Marc Signorile

Member of Aubert family

(b Paris, Sept 30, 1689; d Belleville, nr Paris, 17/May 18, 1753). French violinist and composer. He was probably a son of Jean Aubert, a member of the 24 Violons du Roi until his death in 1710. By 1717 Jacques Aubert was known as a dancing-master, violinist and composer, working at the Théâtres de la Foire, and had written the music for at least five ballets and comedies. In 1719, the year in which he married Marie Louise Lecat and published his first book of violin sonatas, Aubert was appointed to the service of Louis-Henri, Duke of Bourbon and Prince of Condé. In this capacity he composed a Fête royale and a Ballet des XXIV heures for the duke’s entertainment when the young Louis XV passed through Chantilly to Reims in 1722; Aubert played the violin in the role of Orpheus in the latter work....

Article

Elizabeth Keitel

revised by Marc Signorile

Member of Aubert family

(b Paris, May 15, 1720; d after 1783). French violinist and composer. Eldest son of Jacques Aubert. Taught by his father and hailed as a child prodigy, he was a back-desk violinist at the Opéra by the time he was 11 and perhaps even when he was only eight. In 1732 Joseph Francoeur nominated him to the 24 Violons du Roi, although he was not officially appointed until 1746. In 1753 he offered his father’s violin for sale: it was a 17th-century instrument designed by Nicoló Amati. By 1756 he was first violinist and one of the principal conductors of the Opéra orchestra. He retired from these duties in 1774 with a pension and special gratuities ‘in consideration of 43 years of service’; his name can be found on lists of patrons as late as 1783. Considering that he was active at a later time, Louis was a more conservative composer than his father; his sonatas, each of which is really a series of dances, reflect the French early 18th-century style. He is remembered more for his ...

Article

Monique Rollin

revised by David Ledbetter

Member of Ballard family

(b ?Paris, c1575; d after 1649). French lutenist and composer, son of Robert Ballard (i). He apparently never took part in the family business. His father’s partner Adrian Le Roy was probably his first lute teacher; after Le Roy’s death in 1598 he became a lutenist of some distinction, and by 1600 he was teaching the lute to his landlord’s son in lieu of part of his rent. In 1611 he published his first lutebook, and in the following year the regent, Maria de’ Medici, employed him as her maître de luth; in this capacity he became responsible in September 1612 for the tuition of the young King Louis XIII. In 1615 he was still in Maria’s service and performed on the lute in the Ballet de Madame; but in the retrenchments of court expenditure of 1618 his salaried position was terminated and he was henceforth paid only as required. Under this arrangement he continued for 16 years to bear the title ‘musicien ordinaire du roi’ and, although a notarial act of ...

Article

Silvio J. dos Santos

(b São Paulo, Brazil, Dec 17, 1944; d Paraty, Brazil, Feb 23, 2022). Brazilian guitarist, arranger, and teacher. Barbosa-Lima performed for over 50 years in important venues around the world. He started playing the guitar at age 7 and two years later began studying with Isaías Sávio, one of the foremost guitar teachers in Brazil. His concert career started with his debut in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro at age 13. After his successful 1967 concert tour in the United States, he received scholarships to participate in Andrés Segovia’s 1968 masterclasses in Santiago de Compostela, Spain. He produced more than 40 recordings, with a repertoire ranging from classical and contemporary music to jazz and Brazilian popular music, and published books on guitar techniques and repertoires in collaboration with John Griggs. He also published and recorded works dedicated to him by composers such as Guido Santórsola, Francisco Mignone, and Alberto Ginastera. His transcriptions and performances of works by Domenico Scarlatti, Claude Debussy, George Gershwin, Antônio Carlos Jobim, Scott Joplin, and Stephen Sondheim are remarkable for their clarity of textures, in which the melody and bass lines are clearly distinguished from countermelodies and harmonies. Formerly a member of the guitar faculty at the Manhattan School of Music, he conducted masterclasses throughout the world. He published several books on guitar techniques and repertoires in collaboration with John Griggs....

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Article

Adriano Mazzoletti

(b Genoa, Italy, May 15, 1902; d Sanremo, Italy, 1994). Italian violinist, pianist, bandleader, arranger, and composer. In Genoa he studied violin and composition and played banjo for a brief period in an orchestra. He was the leader and an arranger for the group Blue Star (to 1931...

Article

Alice Lawson Aber-Count

Member of Baur family

(b Paris, 1751; d Tours, 1823). French harpist and composer, son of Jean Baur. He settled in Tours, where he and his wife taught the harp, the piano and singing. His two known works, both published in Paris, are a Recueil d’ouvertures op.1 (...

Article

Alice Lawson Aber-Count

Member of Baur family

(b Tours, 1789; d London, after 1820). French harpist, pianist, teacher and composer, son of Barthélemy Baur. From 1805 he studied with his parents and then with F.-J. Naderman in Paris. In 1820 he settled in London as a teacher. His compositions, all for harp, include six sonatas opp.1–2, duets with piano and flute, a collection of ...

Article

Alice Lawson Aber-Count

Member of Baur family

(b Bouzonville, Moselle, 1719; d ?Paris, after 1773). French composer and harpist. He settled in Paris in 1745, four years before Goepfert introduced the pedal harp there. He used the pedal harp in his chamber works, and his sonatas with clavecin or fortepiano accompaniment mark him as the earliest known composer to differentiate between the harp and keyboard instruments. His daughter Marie-Marguerite Baur (b Paris, 1748; d Paris, after 1790) was also a harpist; she made her début at the Concert Spirituel in 1762.

all published in Paris between 1763 and c1773

Article

Douglas A. Lee

[František]

Member of Benda family

(b Staré Benátky, Bohemia, bap. Nov 22, 1709; d Nowawes, nr Potsdam, March 7, 1786). Bohemian violinist and composer, son of Jan Jiří Benda. His autobiography, written in 1763, presents details of his early training and the musicians with whom he associated during his long career; the documentation of his own activities and references to his associates make this one of the most frequently cited documents of the era.

As a youth Benda was an excellent singer, and this talent provided for much of his early musical education as well as for his material needs, starting in 1718 at St Nicholas’s in Prague, from 1720 in the Hofkapelle at Dresden. He returned to Prague in 1723 as an alto and student in the Jesuit seminary, where he began his first compositions, now lost. While participating in a performance of J.J. Fux’s Costanza e Fortezza...