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Svetlana Sarkisyan

(b Jerusalem, Sept 8, 1922). Armenian conductor. In 1945 he graduated from the Jerusalem Conservatory, where he studied conducting with Walter Pfeffer and composition with Josef Grinthal; he then moved to Paris, where he continued his studies with Roger Désormière and Jean-Louis Martinet. In 1957 he became chief conductor of the Armenian PO in Erevan. In 1966 he was appointed director of the Armenian Television and Radio SO, simultaneously working at the Leipzig Opera. After serving as the director of the Spendiaryan Theatre, Erevan (1971–4), he moved to Marseilles. He has appeared as a guest conductor in Munich, Vienna, Amsterdam, the USA and South Africa. In September 1991 he again became music director of the Spendiaryan Theatre in Erevan.

Dourian’s conducting, in the Romantic tradition, has been widely recognized for its strictness of conception and balance of form; his artistic temperament has led critics to compare him to Toscanini and Stokowski. He is noted for his interpretations of operas by Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, Gounod, Borodin, Puccini and contemporary composers. Dourian has also composed choral and symphonic works, many of which are based on national musical themes....

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(William Edward)

(b London, 1840; d London, April 1902). English conductor and composer. He worked first as a music hall pianist in London, then went to India (conducting a theatre company, c1875) and soon after settled in Melbourne. There he wrote criticism for The Age and composed three stage works. His first, Alfred the Great, written in collaboration with Fred Lyster (brother of W. S. Lyster), was an ‘extravaganza’ including arrangements of popular airs and set pieces, and the third, also incorporating airs, tended towards the genre of pantomime; between them came I due studenti (set in 16th-century Spain) which includes large concerted numbers but is chiefly dependant on monologues. In 1891 Plumpton returned to London and the next year was appointed conductor at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre; he composed numbers for the burlesque King Kodak (Terry’s, 30 April 1894) and later served as musical director at the Palace Theatre....

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William Y. Elias

[Karl ]

(b Heidelberg, Nov 13, 1897; d Beit Zayit, nr Jerusalem, Jan 15, 1974). Israeli composer and conductor of German birth . A pupil of Richard Strauss at the Berlin Academy of Arts, he became a répétiteur at the Berlin Staatsoper, sang at the Hamburg Opera and conducted in Baden-Baden. After settling in Jerusalem in 1933, he became the first music director of the Jerusalem Broadcasting Service in 1936. In 1938 he founded the Israel Radio SO (now Jerusalem SO), and from 1957 to 1962 he was director of the Israel Broadcasting Authority’s Transcription Service. In Germany he was active in reviving Handel’s Rodelinda and in 1944 he organized the first Bach and Handel festival in Jerusalem.

On his arrival in Israel, Salmon became influenced by the folk music of the region, which resulted in such works as the Symphonic Suite on Greek Themes (1943) and the Sephardic Suite...

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I.M. Yampol′sky

(b Baku, 14/May 27, 1907; d Erevan, Oct 17, 1957). Armenian conductor . At the Leningrad Conservatory he studied the viola and conducting, and led the viola section of the opera studio. After a period in the orchestra of the Malïy Opera Theatre, Leningrad, he turned to conducting in ...

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(b Kvemo Khviti, 14/Aug 27, 1900; d Tbilisi, July 18, 1965). Georgian composer and conductor. He studied at the Tbilisi Conservatory (1920–28) and then helped to found a music school at Batum, where he was both director and teacher of music theory. From the 1930s he was active as a conductor in Tbilisi as well as teaching the opera class at the conservatory (1937–9) and directing its opera studio (from 1951). His operas Gantiadi (‘Daybreak’, 1926) and Deputat (‘The Deputy’, 1940) were both performed in Tbilisi. He also published writings on Rimsky-Korsakov and Shalyapin and studies of several operas.

Article

Svetlana Sarkisyan

(b Constantinople, 1837; d Smyrna, Feb 25, 1898). Armenian composer and conductor . He studied in Constantinople, then at the Milan Conservatory (1861–4). On his return to Armenia he took part in the activities of the Armenian Musical Society; he also worked with the Gusanergakan Music Theatre and with the Arevelyan T‘adron, the theatre of the Constantinople Armenians. In 1868 he completed the opera Arshak Erkrord (‘Arshak II’), to a libretto by T. T‘erzian, which marked the beginning of Armenian national opera. Excerpts were performed in Constantinople, Venice, Paris and Vienna during the composer’s lifetime. The score, which was thought to have been lost, was discovered in Erevan in 1942, and a version revised by Shahverdyan and Khodjia-Eynatov to a libretto by A. Gulakyan was given in 1945. In the 1870s Tchukhatjian wrote the comic operas Arifi khardakhutyunê (based on Gogol’s comedy The Inspector General), Kyose K‘ehya...