1-20 of 106 Results  for:

  • Music Educator x
  • Keyboard Instruments x
Clear all

Article

Barry S. Brook

revised by Richard Viano

[l'aîné]

Member of Alday family

(b Mahón, Menorca, c1761; d ?Lyons, after 1835). French violinist, organist, teacher and music director. He was the older son of Alday père. The Alday name, presumably referring to François, first appeared in the Parisian press in 1771 after a performance at the Concert Spirituel: ‘M. Aldaye fils, âgé d'environ dix ans, a joué sur la mandoline avec autant de rapidité que de précision’ (Mercure de France, April 1771, ii, 182). He does not appear to have been an outstanding soloist; the name ‘Aldée’ is listed last in the second violin section of the Concert Spirituel in 1786, and probably refers to him rather than to his brother Paul. In 1797 he was a music teacher and ‘premier violon du spectacle’ in Lyons. In 1810 he founded the Cercle Harmonique, a concert society comprising the best musicians in that city. As its director, he played an important role in the musical life of Lyons; he encouraged the performance of contemporary music, including the first performance in that city of Beethoven’s ...

Article

Nicholas Tochka

(Gjoka)

(b Sevastopol, Crimean Peninsula, May 22, 1910; d Tirana, Albania, Oct 6, 1985). Albanian pianist, arranger, pedagogue, and composer. Born in an Albanian-speaking enclave in Sevastopol on the Crimean Peninsula, she received early training in ballet and piano while growing up in a middle-class merchant family. After relocating to Korça, Albania in 1932, Gjoka became the primary accompanist for the local salon culture, which included the art-song singers Kristaq Antoniu, Mihal Ciko, Tefta Tashko-Koço, and Maria Kraja. She received a degree in piano performance from the Athens Conservatory in 1936. Following World War II, she taught at Tirana’s ‘Jordan Misja’ Arts Lyceum from its founding in 1946, and at the State Conservatory from 1962. In addition to training a generation of Albanian pianists, Gjoka was a tireless promoter of folk songs. During the socialist period, she was among the first women to collect folk songs, which she often arranged as elegant art songs for voice and piano. She also held an appointment at the Theater of Opera and Ballet in Tirana between ...

Article

Article

John Lade

Member of Ancot family

(b Bruges, June 3, 1803; d Bruges, Sept 1836). Flemish pianist, teacher and composer, son of Jean Ancot. He also studied with his father. After a continental tour he arrived in London and became pianist to the Duke of Sussex. Later he taught the piano in Boulogne and Tours before returning to Bruges. He published a number of works for piano....

Article

Francesco Bussi

Member of Andreoli family

(b Disvetro, Modena, June 27, 1810; d Mirandola, Modena, June 16, 1875). Italian pianist, organist and teacher. He taught at the music school in Mirandola where he spent his entire life. Crippled in both legs, he constructed a device which enabled him to play the organ pedal-board. He should not be confused with his son Evangelista (ii) (...

Article

Jos Wouters

revised by Ronald Vermeulen

(Franciscus)

Member of Andriessen family

(b Haarlem, Sept 17, 1892; d Haarlem, April 12, 1981). Dutch composer, organist and teacher, brother of Willem Andriessen. He studied the organ with Louis Robert and Jean-Baptiste Charles de Pau and composition with Bernard Zweers at the Amsterdam Conservatory, and in 1913 he succeeded to his father's appointment as organist in Haarlem. In 1927 Andriessen gave up his job as a journalist on the local Haarlem newspaper to teach composition and analysis at the Amsterdam Conservatory, concurrently teaching the organ, improvisation and Gregorian chant at the Roman Catholic School for Church Music, Utrecht. He was made organist of Utrecht Cathedral in 1934 and, three years later, director of the conservatory in that city. In 1949 he was appointed director of the Royal Conservatory in The Hague, and in 1952 he became professor of music history at Nijmegen University, a post he held until his retirement in ...

Article

Alan Walker

In 

Article

Angelina Petrova

(b Pazardzhik, Bulgaria, Oct 27, 1952). Bulgarian composer, pianist, harpsichord player, and pedagogue. He graduated in piano (under Prof. Sturshenov) in 1977 and in composition under Prof. Hadzhiev. He continued with postgraduate studies under Yvonne Lefébure, Zuzana Růžičková (1983), and Milan Schlechta (1977). He is a prize winner from the A. Casagrande International Piano Competition in Terni, Italy (1976), and holder of the third prize in the piano duo category (1980). He is a keen performer of 17th- and 18th-century music as well as of 20th-century works.

He is a professor of composition (2000) and has also served as Dean of the Faculty of Instrumental Music at the National Music Academy in Sofia (1993–9). He is a composer with an individual style in the sphere of tonal and modal experimentation that combines folklore and features of the contemporary instrumental score. His Piano Concerto no.2 was awarded a prize at the New Music Festival in St Petersburg (...

Article

Article

Frank Dobbins

[Anthonis]

Member of Barbe family

(b Antwerp, after 1573; d Antwerp, June 10, 1636). Flemish theorist, organist and teacher, son of Antoine Barbe (ii). On 23 February 1596 he was appointed organist of St Jacobskerk, Antwerp, and later acted as repairer and tuner of organs in other churches in the city. In ...

Article

Alice Lawson Aber-Count

Member of Baur family

(b Tours, 1789; d London, after 1820). French harpist, pianist, teacher and composer, son of Barthélemy Baur. From 1805 he studied with his parents and then with F.-J. Naderman in Paris. In 1820 he settled in London as a teacher. His compositions, all for harp, include six sonatas opp.1–2, duets with piano and flute, a collection of ...

Article

Robert Layton

revised by Daniel M. Grimley

(Maria Beatrice)

Member of Berwald family

(b Stockholm, Sept 8, 1886; d Stockholm, Jan 16, 1982). Swedish pianist and teacher, granddaughter of Franz Berwald. She studied at Richard Andersson’s music school in Stockholm and later with Dohnányi at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik (1908–11). One of the leading Swedish pianists of her generation, she joined the staff of the Richard Andersson school in ...

Article

Ivan Čavlović

(b Kishinev, Russia, Jan 10, 1914; d Sarajevo, March 25, 1998). Bosnian pianist and pedagogue of Russian origin. Blum began her piano studies in her hometown of Kishinev, continuing them at the Prague State Conservatory, where in 1939 she graduated from the Master School for pianists in the class of Viléma Kurza and Jana Hermana. In Prague she met her future husband, the engineer and eventual mayor of Sarajevo Emerik Blum, with whom she moved to Sarajevo. In Sarajevo she performed as a soloist and a chamber musician and served as one of the founders of Collegium Artisticum, a society for the promotion of modern art. In 1945 she became a piano teacher at the newly established Music High School in Sarajevo. From 1948 to 1952 she worked as a music educator and a pianist in Belgrade. In 1955 she co-founded and became a professor at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo. She served two terms as dean, from ...

Article

Barbara Garvey Jackson

revised by Dominique-René de Lerma

(b Chicago, IL, 3 March 1913; d Los Angeles, CA, 26 April 1972). Composer, pianist, and teacher. She began musical studies with her mother, whose home was a gathering place for young black writers, artists, and musicians including Will Marion Cook, Lillian Evanti, Abbie Mitchell, and Florence Price. Bonds showed promise early, composing her first work, Marquette Street Blues, at the age of five. In high school Bonds studied piano and composition with Florence Bea Price and later with William Levi Dawson; she received BM and MM degrees from Northwestern University (1933, 1934). She moved to New York in 1939 and in 1940 married Lawrence Richardson. At the Juilliard Graduate School she studied the piano with Djane Herz and composition with Robert Starer. Other teachers included Roy Harris, Emerson Harper, and Walter Gossett.

Bonds first came to public notice when she won the Wanamaker prize in ...

Article

Robert Layton

Member of van Boom family

(b Utrecht, Sept 15, 1807; d Stockholm, March 19, 1872). Dutch pianist, teacher and composer, son of Johannes van Boom. After studying with his father, he made concert tours and took lessons in piano with Hummel and Moscheles. He settled in Stockholm in 1825. His playing won some admiration there, and he accompanied Berwald on his Norwegian tour in 1827. By 1847 he had given up active concert work to concentrate on teaching. In 1849 he was appointed to the Swedish Royal Academy of Music, where his pupils included Ludvig Norman, Berwald’s protégée Hilda Thegeström and members of the royal family. He published a piano treatise Teoretisk och praktisk pianoskola in 1870. His compositions include sets of variations, operatic paraphrases, studies, short salon pieces and concertos for the piano, a piano quartet, a piano sonata in C minor, orchestral works, chamber music, violin duos and a number of songs. His opera ...

Article

Gary Galván

(Ellen )

(b Schenectady, NY, March 17, 1949). American composer, educator, and pianist. She studied briefly at the University of California at Santa Barbara and Michigan State University before settling at the University of Michigan to complete a BMus in music theory and embark on graduate studies in composition with George Balch Wilson, leslie Bassett , and wallace Berry . Immersed in electronic and experimental music, she also worked with the recently retired ross lee Finney and distinguished herself as the first woman to earn a DMA in composition from the University of Michigan in 1977.

Fellowships from the Fulbright Foundation, the Alliance Française, and a Rackham Prize enabled her to study with Max Deutsch and Eugene Kurtz in Paris and Vienna. Other notable honors include a Sigvald Thompson Composition Competition Prize for her first orchestral piece and a Sundance Institute Film Composers’ Lab Fellowship to work with Bruce Boughton, Henry Mancini...

Article

Ryan Hugh Ross

(b Vienna, March 11, 1897; d New York, June 12, 1995) Austrian-born composer, conductor, pianist, and repetiteur.

Burger began formal music studies in 1916 at of the University of Vienna, attending lectures by Guido Adler and Egon Wellesz. The following year he enrolled at the Imperial Academy of Music and the Performing Arts where he studied composition with Franz Schreker. In 1919, he left Vienna to study composition with Engelbert Humperdinck in Berlin. Upon Schreker’s appointment as director of the Hochschule für Musik Berlin in 1920, Burger returned to his former tutor’s studio. While enrolled, Burger also studied conducting (1921–2) and was employed as accompanist to the tenor Leo Slezak until gaining his diploma in 1922.

Burger served as repetiteur for the Karlsruhe Opera in 1922–3, and in 1924–7 at the recommendation of Bruno Walter he assisted Artur Bodanzky at the Metropolitan Opera. He served as accompanist to Contralto ...

Article

Sophia Kompotiati

(b Athens, Greece, 1921; d Athens, March 6, 2005). Greek pianist and piano teacher. From a very young age she showed significant musical talent. She graduated from the National Conservatory of Athens and, with a scholarship from the Athens Municipality, she continued her studies at the Academy of St. Cecilia, Rome, with the Italian composer, conductor, and pianist Alfredo Casella. In 1948 she won the Silver medal at the International Hague piano competition. Later, she continued her studies in Paris under the soloist Marguerite Long. In 1949 she received the 1st prize in the Long-Thibault–Crespin Competition.

Numerous appearances in Europe, the Balkans, Egypt, and the USA followed, where she presented numerous Greek works for piano. When she moved back to Athens from Paris (1952), the Greek conductor Philoctetes Economides asked her to prepare Manolis Kalomiris’ Piano Concerto. The work was presented with great success under the direction of Economides....

Article

Alan Walker

In 

Article

Antigona Rădulescu

(b Bucharest, Romania, 2/Dec 15, 1887; d Bucharest, Aug 9, 1991). Romanian pianist and pedagogue. Displaying unique artistic inclinations, she studied at the Music and Declamation Conservatory in Bucharest (1894–1901), in the piano class of Ștefan Sihleanu and Eduard Wachmann. She was accepted at the National Conservatory in Paris, where she specialized in the piano with Isidor Phillippe and Alphonse Duvernoy (1903–7). She first distinguished herself as a concert performer, in Romania and Europe. In 1950 she started her didactic career, at the level of musical medium secondary education, then at the Music Conservatory in Bucharest (1953–66). Besides literature (fiction and memoirs), she also wrote musical criticism (reviews, conferences, radio shows). With her unique longevity, she witnessed a century of historic and artistic events. She was part of the Romanian intellectual elite, closely knew the European cultural milieu of the first half of the twentieth century, and has adapted to the political changes implemented by the communist regime in Romania, surviving in the end, its fall....