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Ivan Čavlović

(b Zvornik, Dec 17, 1906; d Sarajevo, 1990). Bosnian-Herzegovinian composer, conductor, and concert singer. He started his musical career as a choirboy in the choir Sveta Cecilija at Sarajevo Cathedral. He studied solo-singing in the class of Nina Mastergazi and Leo Pešek at the Music School in Sarajevo. In 1927 he studied solo-singing in the class of Milan Reizer at the Academy of Music in Zagreb. He was a self-taught conductor and composer. From 1928 he conducted amateur choirs in Sarajevo, with which he performed most of his own compositions. He attained great success with the Croatian choir Trebević. After World War II he was an employee of Zavod za zaštitu malih autorskih prava (the ‘Institute for Protection of Authors’ Rights’) and a conductor of the choir Vaso Miskin Crni.

Demetar set harmonizations of folk tunes and based compositions on Bosnian folklore. His harmonic language is traditional but with a certain freedom in the elaboration of extended tonal harmony. He particularly enriched Bosnian-Herzegovinian choral literature....

Article

Jonas Westover

[Blinky ]

(b Frederiksted, St. Croix, Virgin Islands, Aug 17, 1934). Crucian guitarist, saxophonist, band leader, and singer. He was the son of Ivan McIntosh, a saxophonist active during the early 20th century, and Ethel McIntosh, a singer. He learned music from them as a youth and soon joined a “scratch band,” a local ensemble feature cane flute, gourd rasp, guitar, drum, and bass. By the age of 15, he had joined his father’s group as a guitarist, learning an older repertoire and touring widely throughout the island. During this same period, McIntosh learned traditional songs from his mother, who also encouraged him to study with local storytellers and folk performers. He also joined a carnival-oriented ensemble titled the Wild Indians. By 1955 he created his own “scratch band” called the Pond Bush Hot Shots. In the 1960s he was invited to become the lead alto sax player for the Joe Parris Hot Shots, the country’s leading quadrille group, with whom he recorded into the 1970s. Although he was an active musician during his life, McIntosh labored primarily for the Department of Public Works in St. Croix, as reflected in the name of his next band, Blinky and the Roadmasters (formed in ...

Article

Stephen D. Winick

[Michael ]

(b Limerick, Ireland, Nov 15, 1944). traditional Irish singer, mandolinist, banjo player, and bandleader of Irish birth. Moloney became interested in traditional Irish music as a university student. He began bringing his banjo and a tape recorder to music sessions in County Clare, where he met members of the Tulla Ceilidh band, as well as accordionist Tony MacMahon, fiddler Sean Keane (who would later join The Chieftains), banjo player Des Mulclair, and uilleann piper Willie Clancy. Inspired by the Clancy Brothers and the Dubliners, he and his friend Donál Lunny formed several folk groups. In the late 1960s, Moloney, along with his roommate, guitarist and singer Paul Brady, was asked to join the folk group the Johnstons, which performed a combination of traditional Irish songs and modern singer-songwriter material by such writers as Joni Mitchell and Gordon Lightfoot. They became immensely popular in Ireland, recorded many albums, and were able to tour widely on both sides of the Atlantic....

Article

Edgardo Díaz Díaz

[“El Conde” ]

(b Ponce, PR, Jan 31, 1933; d Bronx, NY, Dec 2, 2000). Puerto Rican salsa singer and bandleader. Rodríguez established himself as one of salsa’s prime singers in the most traditional stream of the Cuban son. At the age of ten, he was a bongo player in Ponce with Conjunto El Gondolero, an ensemble founded and directed by his father and teacher, Emiliano Rodríguez. At 13 he moved with his family to New York, where he worked in a printing office and was drafted for the Korean War (1950–53). Upon his return, he resumed playing bongos and became a singer with various Cuban-styled groups. In 1962 Johnny Pacheco hired him as sonero for his charanga orchestra and they produced four albums, beginning with Suavito (Alegre, 1963). With the creation of Fania Records by Pacheco and Jerry Massuci, Rodríguez became the first singer to record on the label with the album ...

Article

Ruth E. Rosenberg

(b Laredo, TX, Oct 30, 1951). American conguero, Latin jazz bandleader, and singer. While growing up in a Mexican American family in Los Angeles, he was exposed to Afro Cuban music as well as jazz, especially bebop and hard bop. He first performed as a conguero with the vibraphonist Cal Tjader prior to beginning his career as a bandleader. Since then Sánchez has recorded more than 20 albums for the Concord Records label and become a leading figure in Latin jazz. In 2000 he received a Grammy Award for Best Latin Jazz Performance for the album Latin Soul. Sánchez’s music builds upon the Latin jazz pioneered by such artists as Machito, Tito Puente, and Dizzy Gillespie. Like much salsa music, it draws upon the traditional Cuban son montuno form, often incorporating other Afro Cuban genres such as rumba, bolero, mambo, danzón, and guaguancó. Although his albums reflect some of the standard repertoire of Latin jazz and bebop, he has been innovative in integrating soul, R&B, and funk into his recordings. His album ...

Article

Edgardo Díaz Díaz

(b Carolina, PR, Aug 21, 1962). Puerto Rican bandleader and singer. Santa Rosa is considered one of the great soneros of contemporary salsa. At age 12 he formed his first musical group and as a teenager sang backup with the orchestras of Mario Ortiz, Tommy Olivencia, and Willie Rosario. In 1986 he premiered as bandleader and soloist with Good Vibrations (1986), the first of 35 albums to date. His music shows an inclination to conform with values of the pop music industry; his clear-cut styles are typical of the commercial ballad associated with a Latin music offspring known as “romantic salsa.” However, Santa Rosa is equally praised for his ability to navigate between the streams of pop and traditional salsa. Although his recordings seldom feature percussion or instrumental improvisations of any sort, his live presentations entertain audiences and dancegoers with his outstanding improvisatory vocal soneos in the vein of Ismael Rivera and his idol, Andy Montañez. Santa Rosa remains very active today as a performer entertaining fans in concert and dance halls....

Article

Carrie Allen Tipton

(b Henry, TN, Sept 18, 1938). American gospel music television and radio host, singer, choir director, and media executive. He began singing publicly in the Methodist church as a child, although his first exposure to gospel music came in sanctified churches. His involvement with gospel music deepened in Nashville when he served as keyboard player, singer, and director for church and civic choirs while studying at Tennessee State University. In 1978 Jones recorded the first of many albums with his small ensemble, the New Life Singers, whose aesthetic leaned more toward contemporary Christian music than black gospel. Around this time he began hosting children’s and gospel music shows on Nashville television stations. In 1980 Black Entertainment Television began broadcasting one of these programs, Bobby Jones Gospel. The popular program has featured performances by Jones’s ensembles, established gospel stars, and up-and-coming gospel artists. Firmly within the gospel entrepreneurial tradition, Jones’s other enterprises include music festivals, workshops, radio shows, the gospel opera ...

Article

Harry B. Soria

(b Kaumana, HI, Sept 26, 1901; d Honolulu, HI, Feb 1, 1972). American singer, musician, bandleader, composer, and recording artist. Kinney’s career stretched over 57 years, and he achieved the greatest popularity of any Hawaiian singer-musician during his era. Sent to school in Utah, Kinney and his brothers toured as a Hawaiian band. In 1920, his mother died, and he was summoned home to Hawaii, where he continued to hone his musical skills as an accomplished tenor balladeer with exceptional diction and clarity. In 1925, he toured California as a member of Charles E. King’s “Prince of Hawaii” cast. Returning home to Hawaii, he joined the David Burrows Trio and was named the most popular male singer in Hawaii at that time. For the rest of his life, he alternated between touring the continental United States and performing in Hawaii. He was engaged for four years at The Hawaiian Room at Hotel Lexington in New York City. In a ...

Article

Robert Paul Kolt

(b Summit, NJ, Nov 18, 1915, d New York, NY, Nov 7, 1998). American conductor, composer, arranger, and vocalist. He attended the State of New Jersey Manual Training School (Bordentown, NJ), the Institute of Musical Arts (now Juilliard), and Columbia University Teachers College. He also studied voice privately with Sergei Radamsky, conducting with pierre Monteux , and composition with Henry Cowell and Hall Johnson. De Paur composed and arranged music as a member of the Hall Johnson Choir, with whom he sang and served as assistant conductor (1932–6). He then became musical director of the Negro Unit of the Federal Theater Project in New York (1936–9), with which he conducted, composed, and arranged music for various Orson Welles productions, including Macbeth. In 1942 he enlisted in the US Army Air Force and became choral director of the play Winged Victory (1943–6). From this emerged the De Paur Infantry Chorus which, under contract with Columbia Artists Management and Columbia Records, toured extensively until ...

Article

William Geoffrey Shaman

revised by Jonas Westover

(b New York, NY, April 27, 1869; d New York, NY, Feb 15, 1943). American conductor, composer, and pianist. As a child, he sang boy soprano in several churches, singing solos in many oratorios and cantatas. He studied piano with Charles Blum, singing with William Courtney, composition with Frederick Schilling, and conducting with anton Seidl , and he began his career as an organist at various churches in the New York area. He was a rehearsal pianist and coach at the Metropolitan Opera (1892–5), conductor of the Utica Choral Union (1893–4), and assistant conductor to Seidl at the Brighton Beach Summer Concerts (1895–6); after 1899 he devoted himself primarily to teaching and composing. He also enjoyed a strong reputation as an accompanist, appearing frequently with major concert artists. He was particularly supportive of new music of his era, championing Arthur Foote and others. From ...