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Lars Helgert

(Raymond )

(b Pittsburgh, PA, Feb 2, 1954). American lutenist, conductor, and musicologist. Initially a guitarist, O’Dette began playing the lute while in high school in Columbus, Ohio. He then studied with Thomas Binkley at the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis, an early music conservatory in Basel, Switzerland, from 1973–6. O’Dette has made more than 100 recordings as a soloist, accompanist, and conductor. The five-volume Dowland: Complete Lute Works (1995–7) is his best-known recording as a solo lutenist; other notable solo recordings are the Grammy-nominated Daniel Bacheler: The Bachelar’s Delight (2006), Johann Sebastian Bach: Lute Works, vol. 1 (2007), and Marco dall’Aquila: Pieces for Lute (2010). As an accompanist and ensemble member, O’Dette has performed on a variety of instruments. He plays the archlute on Sylvia McNair’s Grammy-winning The Echoing Air with Christopher Hogwood and the Academy of Ancient Music (1995), the baroque guitar on ...

Article

Rreze Kryeziu

(b Skopje, Macedonia, Sept 23, 1909; d Pristina, Kosovo, Oct 21, 1991). Albanian composer, music pedagogue, conductor, and ethnomusicologist. He learned music by analysing the works of other composers and by attending private lessons with professors in Belgrade. During his secondary education he learned to play the violin, the cello, and the piano. He arrived in Kosovo to pursue a career as a music pedagogue. He spent a decade in Prizren (1946–56), which was typified by intense musical activity and during which time he directed the choir SH.K.A. ‘Agimi’ (1944) and was a professor and director of the School of Music (1948). (See E. Berisha: Studime dhe vështrime për muzikën, Pristina, 2004, 209–14).

His familiarity with folk music is evidenced by his analyses of Albanian folk songs, which he summarized in a seven volume work called Albanian Folk Music. As a result of this work, he became known as the first ethnomusicologist specializing in Albanian folklore....

Article

J.W. Junker

[Edward] (Leilani)

(b Honolulu, Hawaii, Aug 4, 1927). Hawaiian musician, bandleader, songwriter, and researcher. A leading figure in the late 20th century revival of Hawaiian culture, Kamae has led the seminal Sons of Hawaii band for over 50 years. He has reintroduced a large number of classic Hawaiian songs from earlier eras, composed several standards, and has documented important Hawaiian topics on over 1000 hours of film.

He began his career in 1948 performing light classics and pop with Shoi Ikemi as The Ukulele Rascals. Self taught, Kamae developed chord voicings and plucking techniques that expanded the instrument’s reach. In 1959 Kamae met Gabby Pahinui and formed Sons of Hawaii. He radically transformed his style for the group, moving between rhythmic accompaniment and pa‘ani (soloing) in a fluid give and take. He also began singing in a distinctive voice full of Hawaiian vocal inflections. With mentoring from scholar Mary Kawena Pukui and others, Kamae began researching older Hawaiian repertoire and composing. His arrangement of waltzes, such as “Sanoe,” and other songs of the 19th century introduced a classical elegance into the group. At the same time The Sons performed downhome party favorites, like “‘Ama ‘Ama.”...

Article

Ned Quist

revised by Linda L. Giedl

[Schlossberg, Artur ]

(b Hamm, Germany, Sept 27, 1909; d Aurora, CO, May 28, 2002). Composer, musicologist, conductor, and pianist of German birth; naturalized American. Born Artur Schlossberg, he grew up in an orthodox Jewish family. After the Schlossbergs moved to Mannheim in 1919, he was introduced to German organ and choral literature by Arno Landmann, first Kantor (1911–43) of Christuskirche, and received piano instruction from Landmann’s wife. With Mannheim’s proximity to Strasbourg and Alsace-Lorraine, Schlossberg became fluent in French. Shortly after entering the University of Heidelberg in 1928, he applied for musicological studies with medievalist Heinrich Besseler. At the end of three years of intensive work, he submitted his doctoral dissertation (Die italienische Sonate für mehrere Instrumente im 17ten Jahrhundert, diss., U. of Heidelberg, 1932). Later that year he was engaged as a coach and conducting assistant to Hans Schmidt-Isserstedt at the Darmstadt Opera.

Beaten with guns by Adolf Hitler’s Stormtroopers in early ...

Article

Irina Boga

(b Ploieşti, Romania May 18, 1916; d Bucharest, Romania, July 23, 1998). Romanian conductor, composer, musicologist, and professor. He began his studies at the Bucharest Conservatory (orchestra conducting with Ionel Perlea 1933–40). He specialized in Salzburg (1941–2 with Klemens Krauss), and also graduated from the Philosophy Department of the Bucharest University (1933–6). He was conductor (1957–76) and director (1957–9) of the Romanian Opera in Bucharest, and conductor at the Alhambra Theatre, at the Company for Comic Opera, and at the Bucharest Philharmonic (1947–62). He was also conductor and director at the Romanian Opera in Cluj (1948–52), professor at the Department of Music History and Orchestral Conducting (1952–76) at the Bucharest Conservatory, the first conductor and director of the Cinematography Orchestra in Bucharest (1953–68), and director of music and advisor in the Ministry of Culture (...

Article

Patrick Warfield

(b Buffalo, NY, Dec 5, 1930). American musicologist, conductor, and educator. Camus attended Queens College, CUNY (BA 1952), Columbia University (MA 1956), and New York University (PhD 1969, with a dissertation on military music in the US Army prior to 1834). Joining the 42d Infantry (Rainbow) Division Band in 1945 (New York National Guard), Camus was commissioned as an army reserve bandmaster (warrant officer) in 1957, a position from which he retired in 1974. Following several years working in music publishing and teaching in New York public schools, Camus joined the faculty at Queensborough Community College, CUNY in 1969. He retired as emeritus in 1995. While at Queensborough, Camus founded and directed the Queens Symphonic Band (1970–96).

Camus has long been a vigorous advocate for the study of American music in general, and bands in particular. One of the founding members of the Sonneck Society for American Music in ...

Article

Mark E. Perry

(b San Juan, PR, March 26, 1854; d San Juan, PR, April 4, 1934). Puerto Rican composer, flutist, scholar, and conductor. His earliest achievements came as a flutist; he studied flute with Italian-born Rosario Aruti. Chiefly self-taught as a composer, he was influenced musically by his father, a cellist and double bass player, and Felipe Gutiérrez Espinosa, an established Puerto Rican composer of sacred music. In 1877 Dueño Colón received the gold medal from the Ateneo Puertorriqueño for the symphonic work La amistad (1877). In 1880 he formed a municipal band in Bayamón and shortly afterwards served as the flutist for the chapel of San Juan Cathedral. Awards for his compositions continued, including a silver medal at the Pan American Exposition, held in Buffalo in 1901, for Canciones escolares, a collection of original songs as well as arrangements for Puerto Rican school children. In addition to showing substantial interest in European masterworks, he embarked on the scholarly study of the Puerto Rican ...

Article

Aleš Nagode

(b Tupaliče nr Kranj, Slovenia, July 18, 1930). Slovenian choral conductor and musicologist. Studied theology in Ljubljana (ordained in 1954). In 1956 he went to Vienna and studied church music at the Akademie für Musik und darstellende Kunst and read musicology at the University of Vienna (doctoral degree in 1960). After his return to Ljubljana in 1960 he became assistant choirmaster of the cathedral, and choirmaster in 1969. He resigned his post in 1970 in protest against the degradation of the cathedral’s church music in the name of liturgical reform after the second Vatican Council. In 1968 he founded the singing society Consortium Musicum, which specialized in the performance of ancient and modern religious music, and regarded as undesirable by communist authorities. The society’s choir developed into one of the most prominent Slovenian vocal ensembles of the time. Between 1984 and 1991 he was music director of the Komorni zbor RTV Ljubljana (chamber choir of Ljubljana radio and television). He initiated the foundation of the Slovenski komorni zbor (Slovene Chamber Choir) in ...

Article

Stanislav Tuksar

(b Dubravka near Dubrovnik, Croatia, June 16, 1934). Croatian musicologist, composer, organist, and choir conductor. He started his theological studies in Split and graduated in 1961 from the Catholic Theological Faculty in Zagreb, where he also attended courses in music at the Institute for Church Music. He gained the PhD in musicology in 1978 at the University of Cologne. From 1959 to 1961, and again from 1970 to 1975, he served in Dubrovnik as organist and choir conductor at the local cathedral. From 1965 until 1969 and from 1980 on he was regens chori at the Zagreb Cathedral. In 1969 he helped in resuming the publication of the oldest Croatian church music journal Sv. Cecilija in Zagreb, which had been interrupted in 1944. His most important scholarly contributions consist of several modern facsimile editions and commentaries on medieval neumatic codices and of musicological activities dealing mostly with Dubrovnik musical history. Among the facsimile editions the most interesting is ...

Article

Achilleus Chaldaiakis

(b Herakleion, Crete, 1946). Greek musicologist and conductor. He studied Byzantine music at the Greek Conservatory and Theology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, after which he received a scholarship from the Foundation of National Scholarships (IKY) and continued postgraduate studies in England. He served as professor of Byzantine chant and musicology at the University of Macedonia in Thessaloniki. His doctoral dissertation focused on Byzantine chant and was the first of its kind among Greek university dissertations. He has published several historical, theoretical, and hymnological papers, covering both Byzantine and post-Byzantine music, as well as material for a course on liturgical studies at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. He has served as academic supervisor for many university research programmes specializing in Byzantine music, and his research has resulted in the organization of special photographic and musical archives. He is conductor and founder of the Byzantine University Choir, established in ...