1-10 of 119 results  for:

  • Librarian or Archivist x
Clear all

Article

Mattias Lundberg

(b Ludvika, June 14, 1911; d Stockholm, Feb 7, 1979). Swedish musicologist and music librarian. She studied humanities at Stockholm College (BA in Musicology, 1937) and Uppsala University (Licentiate thesis, 1958; PhD, 1972). She was associate professor at the University of Uppsala from 1973 to 1979 and was made a member of the Swedish Royal Academy of Music in 1973. She was a member of the Commission of Music Bibliography and the Cataloguing Commission of IAML.

After an apprenticeship at Oxford public library from 1937 to 1938, Johansson took up a position as librarian at the Swedish Royal Academy of Music, where she remained until her retirement in 1977, serving after 1966 as head of its Rare Collections. She was a founding member of the Swedish working group of RISM in 1953, and its secretary from 1953 to 1977. Under her leadership, the Swedish working group produced, in addition to a near-complete catalogue of Sweden’s considerable collections of early music in ...

Article

James P. Cassaro

(argaret )

(b Modesto, CA, Aug 11, 1935; d Trenton, NJ, Jan 22, 2014). American music librarian . She studied at Mills College (BA, 1957), and Columbia University (MA, 1959), before receiving the MLS in 1964 at the University of California, Berkeley, where she was a student of vincent Duckles. In September 1964 she was appointed music librarian at Princeton University, a position she held until her retirement in 2000. At the time of her appointment, the Princeton music collection of books and scores was housed in the basement on the cramped C Floor of Firestone Library, while the sound collection was housed in the Woolworth Center of Musical Studies. In 1997 Morgan oversaw the move of the collection into the new Scheide Music Library in the renovated Woolworth Center. For the first time, the music and sound collections were easily accessible in one location. This prominent music collection, notable for its vast number of music sources on microfilm, stands today as a testament to Morgan’s scholarly depth, a collection built without the electronic resources available today....

Article

Charles Mould

(b Bristol, UK, 1919; d Oxford, UK, Nov 25, 1999). English scholar and librarian. After reading Classics at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge (MA), Boalch became librarian of the Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Hertfordshire. In March 1962 he was appointed Keeper of Scientific Books at the Radcliffe Science Library, Bodleian Library, Oxford (a position he held until he retired in 1975), and in 1965 he was elected a Fellow of Corpus Christi College, Oxford. He was also an FSA. His love of music and gift for information collection and management were essential for the production of his most enduring work, Makers of the Harpsichord and Clavichord 1440–1840 (Oxford, 1956; 3/1995, ed. C. Mould), a standard reference in the field of keyboard organology, offering a model for the identification and presentation of significant data about persons and keyboard instruments.

C. Mould: ‘Donald Howard Boalch: 1914–1999’, GSJ, vol.53 (2000), 9....

Article

Colette Simonot

(Jay )

(b Columbus, OH, Sept 7, 1956). American Singer, pianist, and music archivist. He has been one of the premier interpreters of American standards. More than an entertainer, he has been dedicated to preserving the repertoire of the great American songbook. Feinstein first studied piano at the age of five but soon quit his lessons, preferring to play by ear. As a teenager he performed at weddings and parties in Columbus, Ohio, and after high school he played in local piano bars. In 1976 he moved to Los Angeles and met Ira Gershwin, who hired Feinstein to help catalog his phonograph collection and organize archival materials. For the next six years, Feinstein was Gershwin’s musical assistant, working with him to preserve the Gershwin family’s musical legacy. Through his relationship with Gershwin, Feinstein earned access to many unpublished songs by Gershwin, several of which he has since performed and recorded. After Gershwin’s death in ...

Article

Donald Jay Grout

revised by Mary Wallace Davidson

(b New York, NY, Nov 27, 1878; d Orange, NJ, Sept 19, 1966). American musicologist, teacher, and librarian. He studied at the College of the City of New York (AB 1898), English and philosophy at the New York University (MA 1900), and music with edward Macdowell at Columbia University (1900–02); concurrently he was organist and choirmaster at the Chapel of the Incarnation (1898–1902) and taught in New York schools. He continued his study of music, literature, and philosophy (1902–9), with Robert Radecke at the Königliches Akademisches Institut für Kirchenmusik and with Oskar Fleischer, Max Friedländer, Hermann Kretzschmar, and Johannes Wolf at the Universität zu Berlin, taking the doctorate (a rare achievement for an American in a German university at the time) in 1909 with a dissertation on 16th-century organ and keyboard music. He was also organist and choirmaster of the American Church in Berlin (...

Article

Ryan Raul Bañagale

(b Newton, MA, Dec 13, 1903; d Stone Ridge, NY, May 1, 1988). American music critic and discographer. After a brief stint at Harvard University (1922), Darrell studied composition at the New England Conservatory (1923–6). With Axel B. Johnson, he co-founded the Boston-based Phonograph Monthly Review (1926–32), the first American periodical dedicated to recordings. Therein, at times under the pseudonym “Rufus,” Darrell wrote some of the earliest serious treatments of recorded jazz. In a 1932 article titled “Black Beauty,” Darrell published the first in-depth analysis of Duke Ellington’s music, of which he was an early and dedicated proponent. He viewed recordings as a way for the public to educate themselves about all genres of music but advocated in particular for contemporary American composers. In 1936 Darrell compiled The Gramophone Shop Encyclopedia of Recorded Music, a landmark discography in terms of both style and inclusiveness; he provided incisive introductions for each composer and placed popular and classical music side by side. Over the course of his long career, Darrell wrote for ...

Article

Paula Morgan

revised by Jim Farrington

(b New Rochelle, NY, Dec 16, 1916; d Castine, ME, April 10, 2012). American discographer, editor, and writer on music. A self-taught musician, he studied psychology at Yale University (BA 1939) and Columbia University (1939–40). He held a wide variety of positions, including classical music program annotator for NBC (1942–8); music director of the classical division of Mercury Records (1948–56), where he oversaw the “Living Presence” recordings; director of the American-Scandinavian Foundation’s music center (1950–57); music editor of Hi-Fi Review (1957–63) and contributor to its successor, Stereo Review, until it ceased publication in 1998; and president of CRI (1963–7). A Fulbright Teaching Fellowship in 1956 allowed him to teach advanced recording techniques at the University of Copenhagen. A champion of contemporary music, he published the first discography of Charles Ives in 1964. In 1967 he became head of the Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound at the New York Public Library. After his retirement in ...

Article

Jim Farrington

(b Columbus Grove, OH, Feb 16, 1913; d Boston, MA, Feb 17, 2004). American music librarian. He studied at Hillsdale College (Michigan, BA 1934), the University of Michigan (ABLS 1936, MA 1936), and at Columbia University. He was head of the Audio-Visual Division (1946–54) and then chief of the Music and Performing Arts Department at the Detroit Public Library until his retirement in 1969. He was then appointed head of the Music Department at the Buffalo and Erie County Library (1969–71) and of the Fine Arts Department at the Denver Public Library (1971–76). From 1948 to 1987 Myers compiled and edited the quarterly index to record reviews in Notes, the journal of the Music Library Association, on which were based his Record Ratings (1956) and Index to Record Reviews (1978–89). During his tenure in Detroit, he developed the E. Azalia Hackley Collection and worked tirelessly to promote African American performing artists. Myers was active in the MLA, the Theater Library Association, IASA, and the Audio-Visual Board of ALA and was a founding member of both ARSC and IAML. He was an adviser to ...

Article

Leonard Burkat

revised by Jim Farrington

(Joseph)

(b Salem, IL, May 13, 1913; d Burlington, MA, June 7, 1998). American discographer and publisher. He attended the University of Louisville (BA 1935) and did graduate work at Boston University (1937) and Harvard University (1937–9); he studied organ privately with E. Power Biggs. He was a critic for the Boston Herald from 1937 to 1941. From 1939 to 1953 Schwann owned a record shop in Cambridge, and in 1949, a year after Columbia Records had successfully introduced the long-playing microgroove record, he began to compile a comprehensive catalog of these recordings to facilitate his retail operations. He issued the first installment of the Long Playing Record Catalog in October 1949 (R1979), which listed the 674 LPs then available on 11 labels. Schwann sold the publication in 1976, but continued as editor until 1985.

The periodical underwent several title changes and eventually scaled back to a quarterly publication, always striving to list all the LPs, compact discs, and tapes that were in general distribution, even though it could never be entirely comprehensive. It quickly earned a reputation for accuracy and became widely used. Schwann published a second catalog, ...

Article

Jim Farrington

(b Wisconsin Rapids, WI, May 9, 1951). American music librarian and musicologist. He studied music at the University of Wisconsin–Madison (BM 1973, MA 1974) and musicology at the University of Minnesota (MA 1977, PhD 1985), then served as music librarian and assistant professor of music at Pennsylvania State University (1983–87) before becoming conservatory librarian and lecturer in musicology at Oberlin Conservatory of Music (1987–97), overseeing an expansion of the conservatory library. He was an associate professor of church music and music history at Concordia University, Chicago (1997–98), before returning as music librarian and adjunct associate professor of music at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (1999–2000). In 2000 he became the fourth head of the Sibley Music Library at the Eastman School of Music in its 100-year history; he also serves as associate professor of musicology. Zager was editor of ...