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Claire Levy

(b Yambol, 30 March 1933; d Plovdiv, 12 April 2014). Bulgarian composer and music educator, famous for his work in different genres but mostly for his distinctive contribution to the field of film music. He graduated from the Bulgarian State Conservatory in 1961 under Pancho Vladigerov (composition) and Assen Dimitrov (conducting). Author of the music for over 120 cartoons and more than 40 feature films, Karadimchev also wrote songs for rock bands, marked usually by laconic yet highly attractive melodic lines. His lyrical Byala tishina (‘White Silence’), performed by Georgi Minchev and The Shturtzite, made a particular breakthrough for Bulgarian rock music on the national level by winning the first prize at The Golden Orpheus Pop Music Festival in 1967. And his close collaboration with The Tangra in the early 1980s developed ‘the melodic style of rock’ in songs such as Bogatstvo (‘Fortune’) and Nashiat grad (‘Our Town’). Some of his title songs written for movies such as the ...

Article

Pavla Jonssonová

[Fišer, Zbyněk]

(b Prague, 20 Jan 1930; d Bratislava, 9 April 2007).Czech philosopher, writer, and poet, and a leading figure of the Czechoslovak underground. Egon Bondy’s legendary career began in 1947, when he briefly joined the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia only to resign immediately after the party’s takeover in February 1948. For the next ten years Bondy freewheeled on the edge of the law, proto-beatnik style. During those years he gained visibility among members of the underground by cofounding the illegal samizdat review Půlnoc (‘Midnight’). With the 1949 Půlnoc collection Jewish Names he started to use the name Egon Bondy. In 1957 he enrolled at Prague’s Charles University on distance study while working as a nighttime security guard. He received the PhD in 1967 with a dissertation entitled Útěcha z ontologie (‘Consolation from Ontology’). From that year Bondy lived on disability while continuing to write, but other than his study ...

Article

Amra Bosnić

(b Mostar, 1946). Bosnian and Herzegovinian musicologist. She gained the Masters in Pedagogical Sciences in the Faculty of Philosophy (1977), and the Doctorate in Pedagogical Sciences at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo (1984). She worked at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo from 1971 until her retirement in 2011. She was employed at various levels from teaching assistant to full professor at the Academy, teaching subjects including methods in music education, and pedagogy with the basics of psychology, and was appointed Dean of the Academy from 2003 until 2007. She was also engaged as a professor of Music Culture and Methods at the Pedagogical Academy in Sarajevo (1992–2009).

Ferović was actively involved in establishing and leading the most important music institutions in Sarajevo: the Musicological Society of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Institute of Musicology (2007–9) at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo, the Sarajevo vocal octet Preporod, and the academic female vocal ensemble, also called Preporod. She was an editor and reviewer of the collection of papers of the International Symposium, ...

Article

Amra Bosnić

(b Sarajevo, 1936). Bosnian and Herzegovinian violinist. He graduated in the violin at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo in 1962, after which he completed the Masters Degree in 1964. During the period 1965–7 he had further studies at the Tchaikovsky Conservatory in the David Oistrakh Violin Department in the class of professor Olga Kaverzneva. He specialized at the Santa Cecilia Conservatory in Rome (1970, 1973).

In 1955 he was employed as a teacher of the violin at the Srednja muzička škola (‘music high school’) in Sarajevo. In 1962 he started his engagement at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo, where he remained as an assistant professor (starting in 1971), associate professor (1977), and full professor (1984) in the violin and violin pedagogy. Due to a shortage of relevant teaching staff, he was entrusted with the subjects of the viola and chamber music. From ...

Article

Vivian Perlis and Christopher E. Mehrens

(b Brownsville, TX, 4 Aug 1888; d New York, NY, 11 April 1978). American administrator, pianist, and educator. She was educated in France, Germany, and New York, and in 1906 began piano studies with Bertha Fiering Tapper at the Institute of Musical Art (later the Juilliard School). From 1912 to 1922 she helped organize free concerts for European immigrants at the Cooper Union (New York) under the auspices of the People's Music League of the People's Institute, of which she became chairman. During this period she also worked to adapt Montessori teaching methods to music. With former Montessori student Margaret Naumberg, Reis established the Children's School in New York in 1914, later renamed the Walden School. In 1922 she presented a landmark concert at the Cooper Union in which six composers performed their own works. A year later Reis and other composers left Edgar Varèse's International Composers’ Guild to form the ...

Article

Mark Clague

(b Spring Gulch, CO, 12 Feb 1902; d Ann Arbor, MI, 16 July 1994). American band director and educator. A fierce taskmaster, he elevated standards and influenced generations of band directors and musicians. Revelli played violin as a child, training for a career in Chicago's theater orchestras at Chicago Musical College (BM 1922). Earning teaching credentials from Chicago's Columbia School of Music in 1925, he founded the Hobart High School band, leading the ensemble four years later to its first of repeat Indiana state and soon national championships. He continued taking private lessons on all band instruments and studied conducting and music education at Chicago's VanderCook School of Music (BM 1931; MM 1936). In 1935 Revelli became conductor of bands and assistant professor of wind instruments at the University of Michigan, guiding its bands to international prominence. Known as “The Chief,” Revelli required total effort from his players, who both feared and revered him; he championed bandss as a means for educating successful citizens. Beginning in ...

Article

Dena J. Epstein and Karen M. Bryan

(b Florida, NY, 25 Jan 1835; d East, Orange, NJ, 30 Aug 1902). American music educator and editor. Seward studied in Boston with Lowell Mason, george frederick Root, and thomas Hastings. After appointments as organist in New London, Connecticut (1857–9), Rochester, New York (1859–67), and New York (1867–8), he moved to Orange (1868) and then to East Orange, New Jersey (1868). He edited song and hymn collections: The Temple Choir (with Mason, 1867), The Coronation (1872), and The Vineyard of Song (1874); and music journals: the Musical Pioneer (from 1867), the New York Musical Gazette (1868–72), the Tonic Sol-fa Advocate (1881–6), the Musical Reform (until 1888), and Universal Song (1889–92). In 1870 he became the director of music for the public schools of East Orange....

Article

William Brooks and Christopher E. Mehrens

(b Buckland, MA, 14 March 1826; d Dorchester, MA, 14 April 1888). American composer and music educator. He learned music in singing-schools and assemblies conducted by Lowell Mason, George James Webb, and others. He taught briefly in Massachusetts before moving to Hudson, New York, to teach in public schools and at the Claverack Seminary. By 1855 he was in Albany, where he taught at the Female Academy and was music director at the Pearl Street Baptist Church. In 1865 he moved to New York and worked for Firth, Son & Co. and for Biglow & Main, both publishers of music. Around 1880 he became associated with the Cincinnati publishing firm John Church & Co. In 1884 he was appointed director of choral music at the New England Conservatory in Boston.

Sherwin was deeply involved in the Sunday school movement and published several collections of music for children. He was also very active in ...

Article

Nicola Scaldaferri

(b Shkodër, Albania, 14 June 1920; d Tirana, 12 March 2008). Albanian ethnomusicologist, musician, composer, and writer. He began his musical studies as a boy in Shkodër. In the years between 1940 and 1944 he studied the flute and composition at the Conservatory of Florence, Italy. Back in Albania in the early years of the Hoxha regime, Sokoli was imprisoned, as were other scholars who had studied abroad, and he spent five years in incarceration.

In 1952 he moved to Tirana, where he taught the flute and folklore in the high school. Although he was not qualified to teach at the higher academic level, he played a key role in musical research in Albania. He collaborated on ethnomusicological expeditions carried out in 1957 with East German scholars and in 1958 with Romanian scholars.

He was the author of numerous pioneering books and articles on Albanian musical folklore, employing both descriptive and analytical approaches, as well as surveying important figures of the musical, and wider cultural, Albanian tradition. His writings and ideas shaped the discipline and educated two generations of Albanians ethnomusicologists, including scholars in Kosovo. His many publications include the books ...

Article

William B. Davis

(b Amsterdam, Netherlands, 3 July 1887; d Garden City, NY, 24 Aug 1953). American harpist, music educator, and music therapist of Dutch birth. He received early training in music as a harpist at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague, with additional musical studies in Germany. After arriving in the United States in 1910 he performed as a harpist with the Metropolitan Opera (1910–6), the New York SO (1916–7), and the US Marine Band (1917–9). From 1921 to 1936 he served as director of a committee to study the feasibility of using music in institutions under the sponsorship of the Russell Sage Foundation. During this period he became an important advocate for music therapy through lecturing and authorship of numerous articles about the therapeutic benefits of music. Van de Wall then described music education and therapy techniques for institutionalized adults and children in his landmark book entitled ...