1-10 of 3,174 results  for:

  • Music Educator x
Clear all

Article

Gregorio Maria Paone

(b Capua, nr Naples, 1803; d Naples, 1860). Neapolitan clarinettist and composer. Ferdinando Sebastiani studied clarinet with Michele Rupp and composition with Fedele Fenaroli at the Real Collegio di Musica di San Sebastiano in Naples, where he eventually became a clarinet teacher himself. He also became principal clarinet of the Orchestra of Teatro San Carlo and of the Reale Cappella Palatina in Naples. As well as his orchestral activity he worked as a soloist and played in Paris, Florence, Vienna, and Naples. He wrote a huge number of pieces, which indicates how at that time even instrumentalists were keen on music composition.

Sebastiani used a particular clarinet made by the Neapolitan instrument maker Gennaro Bosa. A variant of the standard Müller clarinet, the Bosa clarinet required the use of the right thumb in order to make some passages easier, while in the Müller system of fingering the right thumb usually serves only to sustain the instrument....

Article

Geoff Thomason

(b Taganrog, Russia, 21 March/2 April 1851; d Manchester, England, 22 Jan 1929). Russian violinist and pedagogue. From 1860 to 1867 he studied with Joseph Hellmesberger at the Vienna Conservatoire, playing in Hellmesberger’s concerts, eventually becoming second violin in his quartet. In Vienna he first met Brahms and the conductor Hans Richter. In 1870 he returned to Russia, where he made the acquaintance of Tchaikovsky and in 1875 was appointed a teacher at the Moscow Conservatoire. From 1878 to 1880 he was the Director of the Kiev Symphony Society. During three years of European touring, 1880–83, he gave the first performance of Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in December 1881, with the Vienna Philharmonic under Richter. Its originally dedicatee, Leopold Auer, had deemed the concerto unplayable and Tchaikovsky subsequently rededicated it to Brodsky. After his appointment as Professor of Violin at the Leipzig Conservatoire in 1883 Brodsky founded his first string quartet. In Leipzig he gave the premières of works by Grieg and Busoni, with whom he formed lasting friendships. His leadership of Walter Damrosch’s New York Symphony Orchestra, ...

Article

Jeremy Leong

(b Vienna, 9 March 1885; d Vienna, 27 May 1964). Austrian Jewish music historian, educator, and critic. In 1912 he graduated from Vienna’s Imperial Academy of Science with a doctoral dissertation entitled Die indische Musik der vedischen und der klassischen Zeit (‘The Indian Music of the Vedic and the Classical Period’) under the supervision of Leopold Shröder. Felber’s dissertation remains an authoritative source for modern scholars interested in the recitation techniques and ethos of early South Asian music. Prior to his arrival in China, he was active in the Indian community in Vienna and had given lectures on Indian music at the Indian Club. Furthermore, he felt privileged to have met the legendary Nobel laureate Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore who was also a noted musician. During their meeting, Tagore shared his views on the aesthetics of European music and Indian classical music with him. After the Anschluss (...

Article

Biancamaria Brumana

(b Florence, 16 July 1804; d Paris, 20 Aug 1863). Italian composer and singing teacher. He settled in Paris about 1830, the year when Antonio Pacini published a collection of six romances dedicated to Maria Malibran. Known as the ‘Bellini of the romance’, Masini wrote over 400 works in this genre intended for the high Parisian society of the July Monarchy. His works were often collected in luxurious albums offered as a gift on the first day of the year. Among Masini’s favourite poets to set to music are Émile Barateau, Amable Tastu, and Laure Jourdain; only a single Masini romance is based on a text by Victor Hugo (Le papillon et la fleur). The success of his romances (published mainly by Latte, Meissonier, and Colombier) was enhanced by the collaboration with famous illustrators such as Jules David and Achille Devéria. The latter provided lithographic illustrations for the editions’ frontispieces, conceived in harmony with the texts and musical settings. Masini’s melodies are elegant, transparent, and light-hearted. They give voice to a Romanticism tinged with melancholy and delicate hues (as one can appreciate in ...

Article

Claire Levy

(b Yambol, 30 March 1933; d Plovdiv, 12 April 2014). Bulgarian composer and music educator, famous for his work in different genres but mostly for his distinctive contribution to the field of film music. He graduated from the Bulgarian State Conservatory in 1961 under Pancho Vladigerov (composition) and Assen Dimitrov (conducting). Author of the music for over 120 cartoons and more than 40 feature films, Karadimchev also wrote songs for rock bands, marked usually by laconic yet highly attractive melodic lines. His lyrical Byala tishina (‘White Silence’), performed by Georgi Minchev and The Shturtzite, made a particular breakthrough for Bulgarian rock music on the national level by winning the first prize at The Golden Orpheus Pop Music Festival in 1967. And his close collaboration with The Tangra in the early 1980s developed ‘the melodic style of rock’ in songs such as Bogatstvo (‘Fortune’) and Nashiat grad (‘Our Town’). Some of his title songs written for movies such as the ...

Article

Jaymee Haefner

(Gabrielle Marie Sophie)

(b Paris, 18 Sept 1875; d Paris, 1 March 1956). French harpist, composer, and teacher. Henriette Renié was the youngest of five children and the only daughter in her family. While riding on a train with her father, the five-year-old Renié pointed to the harpist Alphonse Hasselmans and declared he would be her teacher. After three years of the piano, Renié began harp lessons at the Érard workshop with Hasselmans and later entered the Conservatoire de Paris, winning her premier prix at the age of 11. As a young girl Renié commented upon the difficulty of the harp’s pedals to Gustave Lyon (of Pleyel), inadvertently renewing interest in cross-strung chromatic harps.

Renié toured with the Lamoureux Orchestra under the baton of Camille Chevillard and collaborated with Paul Paray, Ernest Van Dyck, Jacques Thibaud, Jeanne Raunay, Claire Croiza, and Pablo Casals. She gave the première of Gabrielle Pierne’s Concertstück...

Article

Pavla Jonssonová

[Fišer, Zbyněk]

(b Prague, 20 Jan 1930; d Bratislava, 9 April 2007).Czech philosopher, writer, and poet, and a leading figure of the Czechoslovak underground. Egon Bondy’s legendary career began in 1947, when he briefly joined the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia only to resign immediately after the party’s takeover in February 1948. For the next ten years Bondy freewheeled on the edge of the law, proto-beatnik style. During those years he gained visibility among members of the underground by cofounding the illegal samizdat review Půlnoc (‘Midnight’). With the 1949 Půlnoc collection Jewish Names he started to use the name Egon Bondy. In 1957 he enrolled at Prague’s Charles University on distance study while working as a nighttime security guard. He received the PhD in 1967 with a dissertation entitled Útěcha z ontologie (‘Consolation from Ontology’). From that year Bondy lived on disability while continuing to write, but other than his study ...

Article

Amra Bosnić

(b Mostar, 1946). Bosnian and Herzegovinian musicologist. She gained the Masters in Pedagogical Sciences in the Faculty of Philosophy (1977), and the Doctorate in Pedagogical Sciences at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo (1984). She worked at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo from 1971 until her retirement in 2011. She was employed at various levels from teaching assistant to full professor at the Academy, teaching subjects including methods in music education, and pedagogy with the basics of psychology, and was appointed Dean of the Academy from 2003 until 2007. She was also engaged as a professor of Music Culture and Methods at the Pedagogical Academy in Sarajevo (1992–2009).

Ferović was actively involved in establishing and leading the most important music institutions in Sarajevo: the Musicological Society of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Institute of Musicology (2007–9) at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo, the Sarajevo vocal octet Preporod, and the academic female vocal ensemble, also called Preporod. She was an editor and reviewer of the collection of papers of the International Symposium, ...

Article

Amra Bosnić

(b Sarajevo, 1936). Bosnian and Herzegovinian violinist. He graduated in the violin at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo in 1962, after which he completed the Masters Degree in 1964. During the period 1965–7 he had further studies at the Tchaikovsky Conservatory in the David Oistrakh Violin Department in the class of professor Olga Kaverzneva. He specialized at the Santa Cecilia Conservatory in Rome (1970, 1973).

In 1955 he was employed as a teacher of the violin at the Srednja muzička škola (‘music high school’) in Sarajevo. In 1962 he started his engagement at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo, where he remained as an assistant professor (starting in 1971), associate professor (1977), and full professor (1984) in the violin and violin pedagogy. Due to a shortage of relevant teaching staff, he was entrusted with the subjects of the viola and chamber music. From ...

Article

Vivian Perlis

revised by Christopher E. Mehrens

(b Brownsville, TX, 4 Aug 1888; d New York, NY, 11 April 1978). American administrator, pianist, and educator. She was educated in France, Germany, and New York, and in 1906 began piano studies with Bertha Fiering Tapper at the Institute of Musical Art (later the Juilliard School). From 1912 to 1922 she helped organize free concerts for European immigrants at the Cooper Union (New York) under the auspices of the People's Music League of the People's Institute, of which she became chairman. During this period she also worked to adapt Montessori teaching methods to music. With former Montessori student Margaret Naumberg, Reis established the Children's School in New York in 1914, later renamed the Walden School. In 1922 she presented a landmark concert at the Cooper Union in which six composers performed their own works. A year later Reis and other composers left Edgar Varèse's International Composers’ Guild to form the ...