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Vernon Gotwals

(b Eureka, CA, Aug 18, 1905; d Philadelphia, PA, June 1, 1983). American organist. A pupil of Farnam (1924–7), he made his début at Town Hall, New York, in 1926 and graduated from the Curtis Institute in 1934. His career was closely tied to three institutions; from 1927 to 1971 he was organist and choirmaster at Second (later combined with First) Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia; from 1935 to 1972 he was head of the organ department at the Curtis Institute; and from 1940 to 1965 he held the same post at Westminster Choir College, Princeton. His performances and teaching influenced many young recitalists and church musicians. His wife, Flora Greenwood, a harpist whom he married in 1932, often joined him in recitals. To a splendid innate musical ability he added the attention to rhythm, accuracy, and colorful registration that had been the special marks of Farnam’s playing. He published articles in ...

Article

Vernon Gotwals

(b Heron Lake, MN, Sept 18, 1897; d New York, Sept 22, 1960). American organist and educator. The son of a Methodist minister, he received the BM degree from the American Conservatory in Chicago in 1920 and the BA from Northwestern University in 1924. He also studied with Wilhelm Middelschulte, Lynnwood Farnam, T. Tertius Noble, and Nadia Boulanger, and at Union Theological Seminary (MSM 1930, DSM 1944). He taught at Northwestern, the Juilliard School, New York University, the Mannes College, and, from 1931, the School of Sacred Music of Union Theological Seminary. In 1945 he became director there, following Clarence Dickinson, and was Clarence and Helen Dickinson Professor from 1947 until his death. Porter toured as a recitalist, served in many churches (including the Collegiate Church of St Nicholas in New York), and was organist for several years at the Chautauqua Institution. He and his wife, Ethel K. Porter, were the music editors of the ...

Article

Guy Bourligueux

(b Astigarraga, Guipúzcoa, 1893; d Seville, Dec 7, 1970). Spanish composer and organist. He studied with Donostia and others in San Sebastián, with Otaño at the Comillas Seminary, and in Paris with Eugène Cools. In 1919 he was appointed maestro de capilla at Orense Cathedral and then organist at Seville Cathedral, where he became ...

Article

Malcolm Turner

(b Wigan, Sept 15, 1890; d Aylesbury, May 24, 1979). English organist and educationist. He was a pupil of and assistant organist to Bairstow at Leeds (1907–12), and took the BMus (1908) and DMus (1914) degrees at Durham University, becoming a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists in 1909. His first important post, suborganist at Manchester Cathedral (1912–15), was interrupted by war service, after which he was organist at St Michael’s College, Tenbury (1919), and organist and choirmaster of Exeter Cathedral (1919–27). On Nicholson’s retirement from Westminster Abbey in 1928, Bullock succeeded him as organist and Master of the Choristers. In this post he was obliged to provide the music for several royal functions; for the coronation of King George VI (1937) he wrote the fanfares and conducted the choir and orchestra, in acknowledgment of which he was created CVO. He also provided all but one of the fanfares for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II (...

Article

Alejandro Enrique Planchart

(Ramón )

(b Santa Cruz de Pacayrigua, Venezuela, Jan 17, 1739; d Caracas, after June 17, 1799). Venezuelan musician . Ordained a priest in 1762, he travelled in Europe (1769–71), where he came to know continental music. In 1771 he founded in Caracas a congregation of the Oratorio S Felipe Neri, in which he established in 1783 or 1784 what was to become the most important music school in colonial Venezuela. The school employed Juan Manuel Olivares (1760–97) and trained most colonial composers of the 1770s to 1790s, including Cayetano Carreño, Lino Gallardo, José Ángel Lamas and Juan José Landaeta, a group known as the ‘Chacao school’. In 1789 two Austrian naturalists who had visited Sojo in 1786 sent him a gift of scores by Haydn, Mozart and Pleyel, which had great influence on his students. His will is dated 17 June 1799.

J.B. Plaza: ‘Music in Caracas during the Colonial Period (1770–1811)’, ...

Article

Owain Edwards

(b Pwllheli, Jan 15, 1825; d Liverpool, April 6, 1912). Welsh musician. He was brought up in Liverpool, started work at the age of 13 in a solicitor’s office and eventually became chief assistant to the clerk to the stipendiary magistrate. He was elected Justice of the Peace in 1895, the year following his retirement. He contributed regularly to Welsh newspapers and journals, and his books included a biography of Henry Richard and a novel Owen Rees, written in English and portraying the life of the Liverpool Welsh community at that time. Precentor at Netherfield Road Chapel, Liverpool, he was important in the early days of the Tonic Sol-fa movement in Wales. After hearing John Curwen in Liverpool in 1860 he and John Edwards immediately started teaching the system in their Sunday school. In 1880 the two men conducted the first Welsh singing festival held in Liverpool. He also travelled throughout Wales explaining Tonic Sol-fa and setting up classes, and in ...

Article

José Quitin

(b c1620; d Liège, Oct 11, 1684). Flemish musician . He was appointed second succentor at Liège Cathedral on 24 November 1664 and at the same time received a benefice which was replaced by a more important one on 7 December 1668. He was to be responsible for the musical instruction of the duodeni. In November 1669 he and the first succentor were involved in a lawsuit against Lambert Pietkin. The cathedral canons admonished Thorette again and again for negligence, and since he did not improve they dismissed him from his post as succentor on 8 April 1672. But he retained his benefice and probably remained as a singer until his death. Auda was mistaken in stating that he was made a canon of Ste Materne. There is a short Chasse de St Hubert by him ( B-Lc ) for two violins, two cornetts (or flutes), two corni da caccia, bassoon and continuo (this last replaced in a 19th-century copy by two clarinets). It is based on brief fanfare motifs; the use of alternating sonorities would be pleasing if the piece were not unremittingly in G major. (...