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Mark Clague

(b Spring Gulch, CO, 12 Feb 1902; d Ann Arbor, MI, 16 July 1994). American band director and educator. A fierce taskmaster, he elevated standards and influenced generations of band directors and musicians. Revelli played violin as a child, training for a career in Chicago's theater orchestras at Chicago Musical College (BM 1922). Earning teaching credentials from Chicago's Columbia School of Music in 1925, he founded the Hobart High School band, leading the ensemble four years later to its first of repeat Indiana state and soon national championships. He continued taking private lessons on all band instruments and studied conducting and music education at Chicago's VanderCook School of Music (BM 1931; MM 1936). In 1935 Revelli became conductor of bands and assistant professor of wind instruments at the University of Michigan, guiding its bands to international prominence. Known as “The Chief,” Revelli required total effort from his players, who both feared and revered him; he championed bandss as a means for educating successful citizens. Beginning in ...

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John Koegel

(b Bucyrus, OH, March 15, 1854; d Alameda, CA, Oct 16, 1926). American composer, pianist, conductor, and music educator. He studied piano with William Mason at the Boston Conservatory, and piano and composition with Carl Reinecke in Leipzig, where his Symphony in F (1872) was performed. In the 1880s, because of ill health, he moved to San Luis Obispo, California, for its fine weather, teaching music, and leading local performing groups. In 1889 he moved to Santa Barbara, California, where he also taught music, led the town band, and conducted some of the first performances of Haydn’s music in the western United States. There he met members of the Californio elite, who sang Mexican folk and parlor songs for him. McCoy arranged ten of these in his series Canciones del País: Folk Songs of the Spanish Californians (Santa Barbara, CA, 1895), later issued in San Francisco in ...

Article

Lance W. Brunner

revised by Greg A Steinke

(b Joliet, IL, Dec 14, 1929). American composer and conductor. He studied with Howard Hanson, Bernard Rogers, Louis Mennini, and Wayne Barlow at the Eastman School (1948–57), where he received the BMus, MMus, and DMA degrees, and with Tony Aubin in Paris at the Ecole Normale de Musique (1954–5). In 1956 he joined the faculty of Brown University, where he served as chairman of the music department (1963–73) and as professor from 1968 until his retirement in 1992. He has received many honors, among them a Fulbright award (1954–5), a Ford Foundation fellowship (1963), a Howard Foundation grant (1965–6), NEA grants (1973, 1976, 1979), and many commissions (including the National SO, the Rochester PO, the USAF Band and Chorus, the Rhode Island PO, the Aspen Music Festival, and many colleges and universities). In 1993...

Article

Michael Steinberg

revised by Greg A Steinke

[Frederick] (William)

(b Cologne, Germany, Aug 26, 1920; d Lewes, DE, Nov 12, 2004). Conductor of German birth. After immigration to the United States as a youth, he was trained at the Juilliard School, where he stayed on as a member of the conducting staff and faculty. He conducted the New England Conservatory SO (1961–9), was a staff conductor briefly at the BBC, and then was music director of the Syracuse (New York) SO (1971–4). The education of young professionals was one of his particular interests, and he joined the faculty of the Peabody Conservatory as music director of its symphony orchestra and opera in 1976; he became music director emeritus in 1980, continuing as director of the conducting studies program and the Contemporary Music Ensemble until 1998. He has been a visiting lecturer or consultant at Harvard, the University of Michigan, and Sussex University (England)....

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Michael Meckna

(b Springfield, MA, Jan 9, 1900; d Los Angeles, CA, Oct 12, 1974). American composer, conductor, and music educator. He studied at the New England Conservatory (diploma 1923) with frederick Converse , at Boston University (BM 1932), and privately with Alfredo Casella. During a year abroad (1934–5) he received additional training in composition from Nadia Boulanger and in conducting from pierre Monteux and Felix Weingartner. As a music administrator in the Boston public schools (1923–44), a faculty member at Boston University (1929–40), and founder-conductor of the Boston Civic SO (1925–44), Wagner exerted considerable influence on the musical life of that city. Subsequently he taught at Rutgers University, Brooklyn College, Hunter College, the University of Oklahoma, and the Los Angeles Conservatory; in 1961 he was appointed professor at Pepperdine College, Malibu, California. He conducted the Duluth SO (1947–50) and the Costa Rica National SO (...

Article

Kevin O’Brien

(b Hartford, CT, Jan 7, 1923; d Charlottesville, VA, March 16, 1994). American composer, keyboard player, conductor, and teacher. He studied piano with Charles King, organ with Ernest White at the Pius X School of Liturgical Music in Manhattanville, New York, composition with Franz Wasner, and chant at Solesmes Abbey in France. In 1944 he enrolled at Catholic University of America as a seminarian; he was ordained a priest in 1947 and received a master’s degree in Romance languages in 1948. He continued composition studies with nicolas Nabokov at the Peabody Conservatory and Nadia Boulanger. Woollen was the youngest charter faculty member of Catholic University’s music department in 1950. Originally in charge of choruses and chant studies, he later taught composition, paleography, history, organ, art song literature, and diction. He attended Harvard University (MA 1954), where he studied composition with walter Piston and musicology with Tillman Merritt. In ...

Article

Mireya Obregón

(b Mexico City, Nov 11, 1948). pianist, conductor, composer, and educator of Mexican birth. His musical training began with piano lessons as a child in Mexico City. He formalized his musical education later on by enrolling in the Conservatorio Nacional de Música, where he studied under Rodolfo Halffter. In 1966, he traveled to the United States with a scholarship to Juilliard. After completing his studies there, he received graduate degrees from Harvard University and the University of Michigan. Among his teachers were Luciano Berio, Bruno Maderna, and Darius Milhaud.

From 1968 to 1974, Lifchitz was a pianist for the Juilliard Ensemble, founded by Berio and Russell Davies. In 1976, he won the first prize at the Gaudeamus Competition for Performers of Twentieth Century Music. Other significant awards include the United Nations’ Peace Medal and fellowships by the Guggenheim and Ford foundations. He has taught composition at Harvard, Columbia University, the Manhattan School of Music, Juilliard, Argentina’s National University of Rosario, and State University of New York in Albany....

Article

Gary Galván

(Eve )

(b Pittsburgh, PA, Nov 7, 1949). American conductor, educator, violinist, and violist. She began her musical studies in fourth grade on violin. She attended the University of Michigan (BMus 1971, MMus 1972) where she studied with conductor/violinist Elizabeth A.H. Green. Mabrey pursued coursework toward a DMA in orchestral conducting at the College-Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati under the guidance of Theo Alcantara and Louis Lane.

Mabrey taught and conducted at Winona State University (1978–80) and Grand Valley State University in Michigan (1982–89). At Grand Valley she served as Assistant Professor and later Assistant Dean. Notably, Mabrey developed and directed two significant symposia at the University of Oregon Center for the Study of Women in Society in the mid-1980s that featured composers such as Ellen Taaffe Zwilich, Tania León, Libby Larsen, and Pauline Oliveros. A conductor and clinician for the Interlochen National Music Camp and Encore Music Camp of Pennsylvania, Mabrey also conducted Honors and All-State Orchestras across the nation. As a guest conductor she appeared with the Sinfonietta Frankfurt, Oregon Symphony Orchestra, Vancouver Symphony of Washington, and the Savannah Symphony for the Black Heritage Concert Series....

Article

Gary Galván

(b Nashville, TN, Sept 16, 1950). American conductor, violinist, and educator. Kay Roberts began violin studies in fourth grade, performed in the pioneering Cremona Strings youth ensemble, and in 1964 successfully auditioned for a position in the Nashville Youth Symphony under Thor Johnson. At 17 she graduated to the parent ensemble and, in 1971, represented the Nashville Symphony as first violinist in the World Symphony Orchestra under Arthur Fiedler.

Roberts studied music at Fisk University (BA 1972) and Yale University (MM 1975, MMA 1976, DMA 1986). Studying with Otto-Werner Mueller, she became the first woman to complete a doctoral degree in orchestral conducting at Yale. Roberts further honed her conducting skills through study with murry Sidlin , gustav Meier , margaret Hillis , and participation at an impressive array of workshops, seminars, and master classes with notable figures such as Leonard Bernstein, Denis de Coteau, John Eliot Gardiner, Seiji Ozawa, Andre Previn, and Edo de Waart....

Article

Jonas Westover

(b New York, NY, 1949). American composer, conductor, and educator. In his youth Sirota began playing piano and studied at the Juilliard School. He moved to Ohio to attend Oberlin College and Conservatory (BM 1971), where he focused on composition and piano performance, working with such teachers as Richard Hoffman and Joseph Wood. A Thomas J. Watson Fellowship enabled him to perform and study in Paris with Nadia Boulanger. Sirota completed his education at Harvard University, receiving both his MA and PhD in composition; his primary teachers were Leon Kirchner and Earl Kim. In addition to working as a composer, he taught at Boston University, Tanglewood Music Center, MIT, and New York University, where he served as chair of the Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions. He became the director of the Peabody Institute of Music in 1995, where he oversaw a major renovation of the school’s facilities. From ...