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Andrew R. Walkling

(d ?London, 1699). English music publisher. He is first known as an apprentice to the instrument- and bookseller John Carr, where he seems to have worked alongside his master’s son Robert compiling one of a pair of new folio songbook collections to be published by the elder Carr (Robert Carr created Vinculum Societatis, while Scott assembled Comes Amoris); both collections appeared in 1687. In that same year Scott was freed by Carr, paying a fine of 2s. 6d. to the Stationers’ Company ‘for not being turned over ye Hall’, and opened his own shop at the Miter in Bell Yard, near Temple Bar, where he sold the same books as his former master, who was situated just across Fleet Street at the Middle Temple Gate. By 1689 he had rejoined John Carr’s business (Robert Carr presumably having abandoned the trade), and from thenceforward was listed as partner in a number of Carr’s publications, some of which were also sold by ...

Article

Andrés Amado and Linda O’Brien

Among the Maya of Guatemala and Chiapas, Mexico, the word may denote instrument ensembles, musical genres of probable Spanish origin, or particular music events. As a string ensemble it may include one or more three- or four-string rabels or violins, some rudely constructed of half a calabash, or of wood with deerskin sides, and played with loose horsehair bows; one or more six-string guitars or five-string ...

Article

Claire Levy

(b Plovdiv, 19 Dec 1937). Bulgarian composer, pianist, conductor, arranger, and bandleader. He was internationally acknowledged for his innovative ideas, cross-cultural experiments, and contribution to the concept of fusion and free improvisation. Classically trained at the Bulgarian State Conservatory (1955–60) under Pancho Vladigerov (composition) and Andrey Stoyanov (piano), he is the author of numerous compositions in styles and genres including jazz, pop, symphony, chamber, film, and theatrical music. He conducted the Radio and Television Big Band in Sofia (1962–6) and led his own avant-garde quartet, Jazz Focus’65 (1965–8), which won the Critic’s Prize at the Montreux Jazz Festival in 1967. In 1970 he left Bulgaria for political reasons and moved to the USA where he joined the Don Ellis Orchestra (1971–8), and later collaborated with the classical/jazz quartet Free Flight. He also played with outstanding jazz musicians including Art Pepper, Billy Cobham, and Dave Holland, among many others....

Article

Ian Mikyska

Czech string quartet, founded 1999. Its line-up has remained constant since its foundation: David Pokorný and Vladimír Klánský on violins, Vladimír Kroupa on viola, and Vít Petrášek on cello. Although classical repertoire remains central to their professional lives, the Epoque Quartet is remarkable for the breadth and professionalism of its ‘crossover’ work. The quartet has performed with the leading artists of Czech popular music, arranged world music from various traditions (most recently with the clarinettist Irvin Venyš for their CD Irvin_Epoque), and given the premières of over 80 pieces, the style of which ranges from rock- and jazz-influenced music to contemporary art music, mostly by Czech composers including Jan Kučera, Petr Wajsar, Jan Dušek, Gabriela Vermelho, and others.

Their open-mindedness and long-standing interest in various musical fields allows them to perform stylistically in a way classically-trained ensembles often find problematic, particularly in terms of rhythm, feeling, and energy when performing jazz- and rock-influenced repertoire....

Article

Ian Mikyska

Czech chamber orchestra, founded in 1995 by Peter Vrábel. A leading large ensemble for contemporary music in the Czech Republic, the Berg Orchestra has commissioned over 100 new pieces, as well as finding a wide and diverse audience through innovative programming and inter-arts crossover projects.

The orchestra has been crucial in supporting younger generations of Czech composers, both through regular commissions and the NUBERG composition competition. Concerts often take place in unusual venues, such as a cave on the Slovak-Hungarian border, a vacant water cleaning plant, and the interior of the Vítkov National Monument. The list of collaborations the orchestra has undertaken over the years is remarkable, and includes directors such as Heiner Goebbels, Ondřej Havelka, and Jiří Adámek, the set designers Dragan Stojčevski and Antonín Šilar, the dance companies 420PEOPLE, Spitfire Company, and DekkaDancers, institutions like the National Gallery, National Theater, Czech Radio and Television, and a number of festivals both at home and abroad....

Article

Ian Mikyska

Czech ensemble for contemporary music. It was founded in 2008 by the French conductor Michel Swierczewski, under the Prague Philharmonic. Since 2009, Prague Modern has operated independently as a civic association with Michel Swierczewski as chief conductor from 2009 to 2011. Marián Lejava became chief conductor in 2013, with Pascal Gallois taking the role of Principal Guest Conductor in 2015.

They have performed at numerous festivals including Prague Spring, Ostrava Days of New Music, Contempuls, and MusicOlomouc in the Czech Republic, and Musica Strasbourg, Dartington Summer Festival, Festival de musique de Besancon Franché Comte, Poznań Music Spring, and Cafe Budapest Fest abroad. They are the resident ensemble for the concert series Krása dneška (‘Beauty of Today’) and have produced numerous recordings; their disc of Dai Fujikura’s works conducted by Pascal Gallois received the Coup de couer of the Academié Charles Cros.

They have premiered pieces by composers such as Miroslav Srnka, František Chaloupka, Marián Lejava, Francois Sarhan, Peter Koeszeghy, Mika Pelo, and Elia Koussa, and have also collaborated across genres, notably with the filmmaker Jan Švankmajer, the visual artist Kateřina Vincourová, the photographer Markéta Othová, and the actresses Fanny Ardant and Anne Bennent....

Article

Allison A. Alcorn

(CAS)

Organisation established in Montclair, New Jersey, in 1963 to explore musical acoustics and to promote the practical application of scientific principles to the construction and restoration of instruments of the violin family. For example, members of the CAS pioneered methods for tuning the front and back plates of an instrument before assembly, and promoted the development of the so-called New violin family. Carleen M. Hutchins (1911–2009), a former high school science teacher who turned to acoustics research, founded the CAS along with Frederick A. Saunders, John C. Schelleng, and Robert E. Fryxell. At its peak in the early 1980s the CAS had about 800 members and subscribers. It sponsored public programs as well as international conferences (Mittenwald, 1989; Annapolis, 1991; Tokyo, 1992; Cromwell, CT, 1993; Paris, 1995; Ann Arbor, 1996; Edinburgh, 1997; Washington State, 1998). A primary contribution of the CAS has been its extensive collection of acoustics research files, now housed at Stanford University’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics. The CAS merged with the Violin Society of America (VSA) in ...

Article

Ian Mikyska

An annual festival of contemporary music, multimedia art, experimental film, installation, sound art, and related areas, which takes place in Prague each May. It was started in 2011 by Dan Senn, an American composer and the organizer and co-founder of Roulette Intermedium.

The first four editions took place in the post-industrial Trafačka Aréna; in 2014, the festival moved to the much more cosmopolitan Paralelní Polis. The festival aims to disrupt the usual division of artists into cliques, and to provoke interaction between artists from different backgrounds. The organizers’ outsider position allows them to do so non-institutionally, without an established position on the scene, but still employing collaborations with various other institutions: the Center for Audiovisual Studies at FAMU (the Film and TV School of Academy of Performing Arts in Prague), the Agosto Foundation, the 4+4 Days in Motion Festival, and others.

The programming is a mixture of Czech and international performers. International guests have included Jaap Blonk, Phill Niblock and Katherine Liberovskaya, Bob Ostertag, Yves Degoyan, and Joanna Hoffman. Over the years, the festival has gradually mapped several art scenes in the Czech Republic: contemporary composed music (Lucie Vítková, Michal Rataj, David Danel, and the Fama Quartet); sound art (Marek Hlaváč and Michal Cáb); contemporary art (Michal Cimala and Martin Janíček); and experimental video (Martin Blažíček and Michal Kindernay). In addition, the festival organizes open calls for fixed-media and live works from aspiring artists....

Article

Ian Mikyska

Czech string quartet. Founded in 2005 by the violinist David Danel, with the violinist Aki Kuroshima, the violist Daniel Trgina, and the cellist Balázs Adorján. In 2009 Ondřej Martinovský took over the viola seat, and in 2012, Roman Hranička joined the quartet as the second violinist. The quartet’s members are also colleagues in the Prague Philharmonic.

Fama regularly performs at all the major festivals for contemporary music in the Czech Republic, including Contempuls, Prague Spring, Ostrava Days, Exposition of New Music Brno, and MusicOlomouc. The quartet is also a regular fixture of several concert series, such as the Prague Philharmonic’s series Krása dneška (‘The Beauty of Today’) – with which they have been closely involved since the series began in 2004 – and, since 2011, at concerts hosted by the Umělecká beseda.

Fama has also toured internationally in Western and Eastern Europe, the US, Turkey, Israel, and elsewhere, and their artistic activities are closely linked to educational work, which includes workshops (at conservatories in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Turkey, Romania, etc.) and performances of pieces by students and composers of younger generations (at the Ostrava Days Festival and ISCM World New Music Days Košice, and in Bratislava and Vienna)....

Article

Ian Mikyska

Composers’ collective and ensemble founded in Prague in 2002. Over the years, the organizing team has included a number of composers and instrumentalists, with the remaining core today being Tomáš Pálka[1], Michaela Plachká, and Ondřej Štochl[2].

Their programming includes canonical composers of the 20th century as well as younger artists. They hold a call for scores each year, and have presented a number of works by Czech composers of older generations (kopelent, slavický, smolka). Despite a general tendency towards quiet and contemplative aesthetics, they have also performed music by composers of the so-called New Complexity and from more standard post-avant-garde traditions, always with a view to creating a dynamic and compact programme.

Konvergence often collaborates with other ensembles on combined programmes with an unusually well thought out dramaturgy. Over the years, they have worked with ensembles such as Platypus, Adapter, the Fama Quartet, le concert impromptu, the Isang Yun Trio, and the Quasars Ensemble....