1-10 of 1,133 results  for:

  • Traditional, Folk and Indigenous Musics x
Clear all

Article

Article

Article

Article

J. Richard Haefer

Vessel rattle of the Flathead Indians of Montana, USA. It is made by cutting a piece of hide and sewing it into a spherical shape, 7 to 12 cm in diameter, with an extension about 10 cm long to wrap around a wooden handle. The hide is wetted and filled with wet sand, then moulded into shape and allowed to dry, and the sand emptied. Small pebbles are inserted as rattle elements, and the handle is secured to the base of the body. Normally the rattle is not decorated either with feathers or paint. When used for the ‘begging around camp’ ceremony it is called ...

Article

J. Richard Haefer

Rattle of the Aztec (Nahua) people of pre-Contact Mexico. It was a three-legged clay vase with clay pellets inside the hollow legs. The name also refers to other clay vessels containing seeds, stones, or other pellets. According to Molina (Vocabulario en lengua mexicana, 1571), cacalachtli (‘to sound’) denotes any clay receptacle containing pellets and for ritual use. The ...

Article

J. Richard Haefer

[caja de tapeo, tapeador]

Box drum especially of central and southern Mexico and the Caribbean. It is a hollow wooden box commonly about 45 cm square or somewhat rectangular, with a circular soundhole in one or two sides. The tapeadores (performers) strike the box with the flat of their hands, sometimes using a small piece of wood in one hand to increase the sound (a harp soundbox is also often struck by hand in Latin America). The practice supposedly developed with the ...

Article

George List

revised by J. Richard Haefer

Transverse single reed instrument of the Colombia Caribbean costal area. Several types of hollowed-out canes can be used for the body: millo (or mijo, Panicoideae); sorgo (Sorghum vulgare, also called broomcorn); lata (Bactris minor). The tube, about 30 cm long and 6 to 8 cm in diameter, is open at both ends. Four equidistant fingerholes are pierced about 3 to 4 cm apart near the distal end (five holes in the Departamento de Córdoba). An idioglot reed 5 to 7 cm long by 2 cm wide is cut from the tube near the proximal end. The uncut end of the reed is wrapped in cord to prevent it from splitting off, and a single strand of string may be tied under the reed at the open end to hold the reed up from the body.

The instrument is held horizontally with the entire reed and adjacent area covered by the mouth; the proximal end is stabilised by the left hand while the right hand fingers the holes. Articulation is achieved by exhaling and inhaling across the reed, inhaling for the lower pitches. Movement of the jaw, tongue, and lips also affects the intonation, especially for exhalation....

Article

Canari  

J. Richard Haefer

Guitar-like plucked chordophone of the Huichol (Wixáritari or Wirr’ariki) people of west-central Mexico. It is slightly larger than a violin. Typically the soundbox, neck (with four to six frets), nut, and pegboard are carved from a single piece of wood, and a thin piece of cedar serves as a soundtable; the soundbox is only slightly waisted or even oval. A bridge is attached to the soundtable using glue from a local plant. The four or five strings can be of metal, monofilament nylon, or gut. It is played with the ...

Article

J. Richard Haefer

Folk guitar of the Nahua people of the Huastecan region of central Mexico. It is smaller than a normal guitar (55 cm long overall), is unfretted, and has four strings of natural fibre or nowadays monofilament nylon. It possibly is named from its geographical area of use (a municipality in the state of Hidalgo), and is played in both religious and secular ensembles....

Article

John M. Schechter

Small spherical bell of Spain and the New World, where it is sometimes called a ‘hawk’s bell’. Cascabeles are worn by dancers or tied to the end of a stick which is shaken. Among North American tribes, they are sometimes worn on ceremonial costumes to enhance the rhythm of the dance. Pellet bells were brought to the New World by Europeans, but similar pre-Contact bells were made of clay and metal. The Maya people of Central America had metal pellet-bell rattles (tzitzmoc) which were associated with Ah-Puch, the god of death. Metal pellet bells are indigenous to parts of Peru, Colombia, and Ecuador. In Cuba, bands of cascabeles and other small bells are tied around both heads of the largest drum of the Lucumí cults, and the pandero of Ésú Eléggua has cascabeles attached in the soundbox. Among the Mapuche people of southern-central Chile shamans use cascabeles (...