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Imogen Fellinger, Julie Woodward, Dario Adamo, Silvia Arena, Robert Balchin, André Balog, Georgina Binns, Yael Bitrn, Zdravko Blažeković, Marco Capra, Leandro Donozo, Johan Eeckeloo, Massimo Gentili-Tedeschi, Veslemöy Heintz, Anne Ørbaek Jensen, Masakata Kanazawa, Simon Lancaster, Claus Røllum-Larsen, Lenita W.M. Nogueira, Jill Palmer, Ingrid Schubert, Martie Severt, John Shepard, Pamela Thompson and Chris Walton

In 

Article

Imogen Fellinger, Julie Woodward, Dario Adamo, Silvia Arena, Robert Balchin, André Balog, Georgina Binns, Yael Bitrn, Zdravko Blažeković, Marco Capra, Leandro Donozo, Johan Eeckeloo, Massimo Gentili-Tedeschi, Veslemöy Heintz, Anne Ørbaek Jensen, Masakata Kanazawa, Simon Lancaster, Claus Røllum-Larsen, Lenita W.M. Nogueira, Jill Palmer, Ingrid Schubert, Martie Severt, John Shepard, Pamela Thompson and Chris Walton

In 

Article

Laurence Libin, Arnold Myers, Barbara Lambert and Albert R. Rice

Musical instruments are collected for many reasons — for use in performance, as objects of veneration or visual art, to furnish ethnological and historical evidence, to illustrate technological developments and serve as models for new construction, for financial investment and sale, and merely to satisfy curiosity. Amateur and professional musicians, wealthy aristocrats, religious and municipal bodies, schools and museums are among those who amass instruments for one reason or another. Criteria distinguishing successful modern collections include not merely size, but also quality and accessibility of holdings, condition and documentation of individual objects, and integrity or coherence of the whole. This article outlines the history of instrument collecting with attention to the motives and conditions that influence collectors, and deals with assemblages of musical instruments gathered intentionally and more or less permanently. Instruments awaiting dispersal (e.g. in a dealer’s or maker’s shop) or accumulated apparently by chance are considered only in passing....

Article

(IAMIC)

A worldwide network of national organizations promoting new music. It was established in 1958, originally as a meeting of ‘National Music Centre Representatives’; IAMIC was then formed in 1962 as a constituent branch of the International Association of Music Libraries, Archives and Documentation Centres [IAML]. This affiliation continued until 1991 when IAMIC became a fully independent association under the aegis of the International Music Council. In 1999 it had 40 members, most of which are autonomous organizations with national status, giving them access to funds from a range of sources including national, regional and local government, arts councils, major foundations and copyright organizations. Music information centres have as their chief purpose the documentation and promotion at home and abroad of their national music (with emphasis generally on contemporary art music), and collect scores, parts, recordings, books, articles, analyses of compositions, interviews and press cuttings; many also issue publications and recordings. The following is a list of such centres....

Article

(Fr. Association Internationale d'Archives Sonores et Audiovisuelles; Ger. Internationale Vereinigung der Schall- und Audiovisuellen Archive)

Organization founded in Amsterdam in 1969 to function as a medium for international cooperation between Sound archives. It has over 350 members in more than 52 countries, including representatives of the archives themselves, as well as other individuals involved with the collection, preservation and dissemination of recorded material. In addition to an annual conference, the IASA publishes the biannual IASA Journal (formerly the Phonographic Bulletin) and a quarterly Information Bulletin; a membership directory is also available. Its specialist publications include Sound Archives: a Guide to their Establishment and Development, ed. D. Lance (Milton Keynes, 1983), and Selection in Sound Archives, ed. H. Wallace (Milton Keynes, 1984), a collection of papers given at the annual conferences. In 1999 The IASA Cataloguing Rules were published (Aarhus, 1999), and they are available, together with various technical guidelines and copies of the Information Bulletin (1997–) at the IASA website: ...

Article

Barbara Lambert and Albert R. Rice

In 

Article

Laurence Libin and Arnold Myers

In 

Article

Imogen Fellinger, Julie Woodward, Dario Adamo, Silvia Arena, Robert Balchin, André Balog, Georgina Binns, Yael Bitrn, Zdravko Blažeković, Marco Capra, Leandro Donozo, Johan Eeckeloo, Massimo Gentili-Tedeschi, Veslemöy Heintz, Anne Ørbaek Jensen, Masakata Kanazawa, Simon Lancaster, Claus Røllum-Larsen, Lenita W.M. Nogueira, Jill Palmer, Ingrid Schubert, Martie Severt, John Shepard, Pamela Thompson and Chris Walton

The present article provides a general account of musical periodicals and their history; it is supplemented by a comprehensive list of musical periodicals, arranged by continent and country, with an alphabetical index. Periodical editions of music are presented in a separate section.

In this article, dates given normally represent first and last volumes or, in certain special cases, issues; dates given with an oblique stroke (e.g. 1971/2) refer to a volume beginning in one year and ending in another. Fuller information on title changes and on breaks in a periodical’s run will be found in the list section below.

Periodicals are publications appearing at regular (or sometimes irregular) intervals and, normally, furnished with serial numbers indicating annual volumes. They primarily contain such material as essays, reports, critiques and news items. In addition to their periodical mode of publication they have in common with newspapers an intention of continuance, an approach determined by publisher or editor, an objective of variety of content and to some extent contemporary relevance. In music, the concept of the periodical also includes yearbooks, annual reports and the proceedings of institutions, almanacs on music and similarly orientated publications; works published in fascicles (part-works, serials etc.) are to be distinguished from periodicals proper....

Article

Laurence Libin and Arnold Myers

In 

Article

Barry S. Brook

revised by Zdravko Blažeković and Antonio Baldassare

[RidIM; International Repertory of Musical Iconography; Internationales Repertorium der Musikikonographie]

An international project, founded at a meeting of the International Association of Music Librarians (1971), on the initiative of Barry S. Brook, Geneviève Thibault and Harald Heckmann with the assistance of Howard Mayer Brown, Walter Salmen and Emanuel Winternitz.

Its aim is, on the one hand, to develop methods, means and research centres for the classification, cataloguing, reproduction and study of iconographical material relating to music, and, on the other hand, to function as a framework for the scholarly interpretation of visual sources with musical subject matter by organizing and facilitating conferences. It is designed to assist performers, historians, librarians, students, instrument makers, record manufacturers and book publishers to make the fullest use of visual materials for scholarly and practical purposes.

The cataloguing of musico-iconographic documents was until the early 1970s largely a private, uncoordinated affair, and was poorly equipped with methodology and research tools. Several systems of cataloguing visual materials have been proposed, but RIdIM appears to have become firmly established for two reasons: because it uses new technologies that facilitate the cataloguing and reproduction of vast numbers of sources; and because RIdIM could follow RISM (...