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E. Douglas Bomberger

Concerts consisting exclusively of works by American composers. The practice of promoting American composers by segregating their music has recurred often since the middle of the 19th century and was especially in vogue in the late 1880s, during World War II, and in the years around the Bicentennial of American independence in 1976.

The American Music Association was founded in 1855 by C.J. Hopkins to counter the assertion that American composers had not written enough compositions to present an entire concert. It presented ten concerts of works by native composers and resident foreigners in three seasons before succumbing to the financial panic of 1857. In May 1877, Russian pianist Annette Essipoff performed American Composers’ Concerts in Boston and New York on stages decked with red, white and blue.

The fad for American Composers’ Concerts in the 1880s was a reaction to inequities in the copyright laws of the era. Because the United States did not have an international copyright agreement, publishers could reprint foreign works without paying royalties. Even the best American composers—who were entitled to royalties—found it difficult to compete against cheaply produced foreign compositions flooding the American market. In addition to lobbying for copyright protection, composers and performers were determined to introduce their works to the public through performances....

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[ASOL]

Organization founded in 1942 to provide artistic, financial and organizational support for American orchestras. In 1999 its members included nearly 900 symphony, chamber, youth and university orchestras. In addition to offering seminars and workshops for orchestra managers, staff and volunteers, the league sponsors an Orchestra Management Fellowship Program and provides scholarships for black American student musicians. In ...

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Eric Blom and Beverly Wilcox

(Fr.: ‘sacred’ or ‘witty’ concert

A concert series founded in Paris in 1725 by Anne Danican Philidor, initially to perform instrumental music and sacred works with Latin texts during Holy Week and feast days when the theatres were closed. Secular works with French texts were sung in special concerts français from 1728 to 1733, and in regular programmes from 1786 to the end of the series. The Concert Spirituel was at the centre of Paris’s non-operatic musical life until the founding of the Concert des Amateurs (1769). The last director, Bertheaume, abandoned the enterprise after the 13 May 1790 performance. Concerts spirituels, not connected to the original series but consisting of programmes on the Parisian model, or simply of sacred music, had been given in Vienna and other European centres beginning in the late 18th century; in Paris, theatre orchestras and concert societies began giving them during the French Revolution. They continued during periods of royalism and eventually became part of the tradition of the Société des Concerts du Conservatoire....

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Tatjana Marković

The first Serbian choral society in Serbia proper, founded in 1853 as the Belgrade Choral Society (Beogradsko pevačko društvo, henceforth BCS), renamed in 1929 as the First BCS. Working under the auspices of the royal family Obrenović, it was originally a male choir, later a mixed choir, and included a music school. Due to the lack of choir compositions in the Serbian language during the first years of BCS’s work, with Milan Milovuk, the repertoire was based on songs by German, Czech, Russian, and Hungarian composers. The national orientation, resulting in arrangements and stylizations of folk melodies and other compositions, was encouraged by Stevan Todorović, at various times a board member or the president and the main ideologist of the choral society, especially during the engagement of the most prominent Serbian composers as conductors, including Kornelije Stanković, Davorin Jenko, and Josif Marinković, culminating with Stevan Mokranjac. Mokranjac promoted his own choral music, as well as that of his contemporaries and predecessors, not only in the capital of Serbia and the places where a dispersed Serbian population lived (in what is now Vojvodina, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, and Macedonia), but also in Greece, Hungary, Bulgaria, the Ottoman Empire/Turkey, Russia, and Germany, performing concerts for the kings, emperors, and a sultan with great success. This peak in BCS history (...

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Viennese music society. Founded officially in 1814 (succeeding the Gesellschaft Adeliger Frauen, founded in 1812), it organized the foundation of a conservatory in 1817. Originally it had an amateur orchestra; now it organizes concerts at the Musikverein with local or visiting orchestras, as well as recitals. It has an important music collection. ...