1-10 of 10 results  for:

  • Musicology and Music History x
Clear all

Article

Article

Klaus Wachsmann, Margaret J. Kartomi, Erich M. von Hornbostel and Curt Sachs

Klaus Wachsmann, revised by Margaret J. Kartomi

‘Musical instrument’ is a self-explanatory term for an observer in his own society; it is less easy to apply on a worldwide scale because the notion of music itself in such a wide context escapes definition. Hornbostel (1933, p.129) advised that ‘for purposes of research everything must count as a musical instrument with which sound can be produced intentionally’, and wrote of sound-producing instruments, or, for short, sound instruments. The German word ‘Instrumentenkunde’ and its English equivalent ‘organology’ avoid the issue by taking the reference to sound or music for granted. Hood (1971, p.124) distinguished between organology and organography, intending the distinction to separate description plain and simple from the body of knowledge that bears on problems of taxonomy and on the principles that at one time or another have served as bases for systems of classification. Both have in common a concern for structural detail....

Article

Laurence Libin, Arnold Myers, Barbara Lambert and Albert R. Rice

Musical instruments are collected for many reasons — for use in performance, as objects of veneration or visual art, to furnish ethnological and historical evidence, to illustrate technological developments and serve as models for new construction, for financial investment and sale, and merely to satisfy curiosity. Amateur and professional musicians, wealthy aristocrats, religious and municipal bodies, schools and museums are among those who amass instruments for one reason or another. Criteria distinguishing successful modern collections include not merely size, but also quality and accessibility of holdings, condition and documentation of individual objects, and integrity or coherence of the whole. This article outlines the history of instrument collecting with attention to the motives and conditions that influence collectors, and deals with assemblages of musical instruments gathered intentionally and more or less permanently. Instruments awaiting dispersal (e.g. in a dealer’s or maker’s shop) or accumulated apparently by chance are considered only in passing....

Article

Barbara Lambert and Albert R. Rice

In 

Article

Laurence Libin and Arnold Myers

In 

Article

Article

Laurence Libin and Arnold Myers

In 

Article

Laurence Libin and Jessica L. Wood

Term introduced in the 20th century for instruments that had become obsolete but later were reintroduced as copies based on historical models. Some 19th-century antiquarians essayed earlier music on harpsichords, lutes, viols, recorders, and other types that had fallen out of production, for example in concerts organized by François-Joseph Fétis at the Paris Conservatoire from the mid-1830s, by Prince Albert at the court of Queen Victoria in 1845, and later by Edward John Payne and A.J. Hipkins in London, Paul de Wit in Leipzig, and the Mozart Symphony Club in New York. Better to serve such practical needs and to meet demand from collectors, replicas and modernized versions of old instruments were occasionally made at that time. Obsolete instruments also reappeared in new guises in the course of 19th-century nationalistic folk revivals, as in the case of German lute-guitars and the decorative, French Baroque-inspired ivory cornemuses produced by the obscure P. Gaillard. Despite the general inaccuracy of their portrayals of instruments, Pre-Raphaelite artists were influential in heightening awareness of rebecs, psalteries, portative organs, and other obsolete instruments. Newly designed harpsichords by Érard and Pleyel were showcased at the ...

Article

Laurence Libin and Arnold Myers

In 

Article

Laurence Libin and Arnold Myers

In