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Jean-Michel Nectoux

(Urbain)

(b Pamiers, Ariège, May 12, 1845; d Paris, Nov 4, 1924). French composer, teacher, pianist and organist. The most advanced composer of his generation in France, he developed a personal style that had considerable influence on many early 20th-century composers. His harmonic and melodic innovations also affected the teaching of harmony for later generations.

He was the youngest of six children (one a daughter), born to Toussaint-Honoré Fauré (1810–85) and Marie-Antoinette-Hélène Lalène-Laprade (1809–87), a member of the minor aristocracy. Gabriel was sent to a foster-nurse in the village of Verniolle for four years. In 1849 his father was appointed director of the Ecole Normale at Montgauzy, near Foix; Fauré later recalled that from his early childhood he spent hours playing the harmonium in the chapel adjoining the school. An old blind lady, who came to listen and give advice, told his father about his gift for music; a certain Bernard Delgay shares the honour of having been his first music teacher. During the summer of ...

Article

Amra Bosnić

(b Sarajevo, 1936). Bosnian and Herzegovinian violinist. He graduated in the violin at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo in 1962, after which he completed the Masters Degree in 1964. During the period 1965–7 he had further studies at the Tchaikovsky Conservatory in the David Oistrakh Violin Department in the class of professor Olga Kaverzneva. He specialized at the Santa Cecilia Conservatory in Rome (1970, 1973).

In 1955 he was employed as a teacher of the violin at the Srednja muzička škola (‘music high school’) in Sarajevo. In 1962 he started his engagement at the Academy of Music in Sarajevo, where he remained as an assistant professor (starting in 1971), associate professor (1977), and full professor (1984) in the violin and violin pedagogy. Due to a shortage of relevant teaching staff, he was entrusted with the subjects of the viola and chamber music. From ...

Article

Vivian Perlis and Christopher E. Mehrens

(b Brownsville, TX, 4 Aug 1888; d New York, NY, 11 April 1978). American administrator, pianist, and educator. She was educated in France, Germany, and New York, and in 1906 began piano studies with Bertha Fiering Tapper at the Institute of Musical Art (later the Juilliard School). From 1912 to 1922 she helped organize free concerts for European immigrants at the Cooper Union (New York) under the auspices of the People's Music League of the People's Institute, of which she became chairman. During this period she also worked to adapt Montessori teaching methods to music. With former Montessori student Margaret Naumberg, Reis established the Children's School in New York in 1914, later renamed the Walden School. In 1922 she presented a landmark concert at the Cooper Union in which six composers performed their own works. A year later Reis and other composers left Edgar Varèse's International Composers’ Guild to form the ...

Article

Mark Clague

(b Spring Gulch, CO, 12 Feb 1902; d Ann Arbor, MI, 16 July 1994). American band director and educator. A fierce taskmaster, he elevated standards and influenced generations of band directors and musicians. Revelli played violin as a child, training for a career in Chicago's theater orchestras at Chicago Musical College (BM 1922). Earning teaching credentials from Chicago's Columbia School of Music in 1925, he founded the Hobart High School band, leading the ensemble four years later to its first of repeat Indiana state and soon national championships. He continued taking private lessons on all band instruments and studied conducting and music education at Chicago's VanderCook School of Music (BM 1931; MM 1936). In 1935 Revelli became conductor of bands and assistant professor of wind instruments at the University of Michigan, guiding its bands to international prominence. Known as “The Chief,” Revelli required total effort from his players, who both feared and revered him; he championed bandss as a means for educating successful citizens. Beginning in ...

Article

William B. Davis

(b Amsterdam, Netherlands, 3 July 1887; d Garden City, NY, 24 Aug 1953). American harpist, music educator, and music therapist of Dutch birth. He received early training in music as a harpist at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague, with additional musical studies in Germany. After arriving in the United States in 1910 he performed as a harpist with the Metropolitan Opera (1910–6), the New York SO (1916–7), and the US Marine Band (1917–9). From 1921 to 1936 he served as director of a committee to study the feasibility of using music in institutions under the sponsorship of the Russell Sage Foundation. During this period he became an important advocate for music therapy through lecturing and authorship of numerous articles about the therapeutic benefits of music. Van de Wall then described music education and therapy techniques for institutionalized adults and children in his landmark book entitled ...