1-20 of 221 results  for:

  • Early 18th c./Late Baroque (1700-1750) x
Clear all

Article

Owen Jander

revised by Giancarlo Rostirolla

[‘Il Bolsena’]

(b Bolsena, Nov 30, 1663; d Rome, July 22, 1742). Italian singer, writer and composer of Venetian origin. After early study at Montefiascone he was sent to Rome. Though his admission to the Cappella Giulia was recorded on 1 December 1682, he did not take up a post there until much later. In 1682 (or at the latest 16 September 1686) Adami became a member of the Congregazione dei Musici di S Cecilia, a fact which would confirm his professional activity in the sacred circles of Rome. He was a castrato of obviously unusual talent, but the remarkable success of his career also owed much to the fact that he enjoyed the protection of Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni – the most influential Roman music patron of the day – in whose palace he served as musician-in-residence from 1686 to 1740. On 5 October 1690 he became a member of the Arcadia – the foremost musico-literary academy in Rome – where he was dubbed ‘Caricle Piseo’. Aided by Ottoboni’s patronage he was admitted as a soprano to the Cappella Sistina at the age of 26 (...

Article

Michael Talbot

(b Venice, c1710; d Rome, Oct 14, 1746). Italian composer, harpsichordist and singer. Alberti's claim to historical recognition rests traditionally on his harpsichord sonatas, in which the arpeggiated bass that lent his name a posthumous notoriety is a prominent feature (see Alberti bass). In his lifetime, however, Alberti was equally famous as a singer and as a performer (sometimes as self-accompanist) on the harpsichord. His amateur status was perhaps unfairly seized upon by his detractors, for his reported early training in singing and counterpoint under A. Biffi and A. Lotti does not suggest an inadequate grounding; it may, however, account for the restricted quantity and scope of his output. Of his non-musical career little is recorded except that he served the Venetian ambassador, Pietro Andrea Cappello, as a page on a visit to Spain about 1736, provoking Farinelli's admiration of his singing, and subsequently joined the household of Marquis Giovanni Carlo Molinari in Rome. His harpsichord sonatas are generally believed to date from these last years. He is buried in S Marco, Rome....

Article

Dennis Libby

(b Milan, c 1720; d after 1766). Italian tenor . He made his début in opera seria in Venice in autumn 1737, then sang with the Mingotti company in central Europe, resuming his Italian career in autumn 1740 when he was quickly recognized as a leading artist with engagements in the most important theatres. In Venice he sang in Gluck’s ...

Article

Walter Emery

revised by Andreas Glöckner

(b Berna bei Seidenberg, Oberlausitz, bap. Jan 1, 1720; d Naumburg, bur. July 25, 1759). German organist and composer. He attended the Lauban Lyceum in 1733, and was a singer and assistant organist at St Maria Magdalena, Breslau, from about 1740 until the beginning of 1744. He then wished to return to Germany and devote himself to ‘higher studies’ at Leipzig, and as his parents were poor, he asked for a viaticum. He was granted four thalers on 23 January 1744, and on 19 March he matriculated at Leipzig University as a theological student. He soon began to assist Bach, chiefly as a bass, and did so regularly from Michaelmas 1745. In taking on a university student Bach exceeded his authority, but he was always short of basses, for the boys of the Thomasschule often left before their voices had settled. On 16 April 1746 W.F. Bach recommended Altnickol as his successor at Dresden, saying that he had studied the keyboard and composition with his father; but he was disregarded. On ...

Article

Julie Anne Sadie

(b Lyons, 1687; d Paris, Dec 3, 1747). French soprano. Trained as a singer and actress by Marthe le Rochois, she made her début at the Opéra in the 1711 revival of Michel de la Barre’s La vénitienne (1705). For the next 30 years she sang major roles in up to five productions each season, and she retired with a generous pension at Easter 1741. After her début she was immediately given important roles in new productions beginning with Campra’s Idomenée (1712) and Salomon’s Médée et Jason (1713); 23 years later she sang the same role, Cléone, in a revival of the Salomon opera and was warmly praised by the Mercure (Dec 1736). Antier appeared in almost two dozen Lully revivals; at one performance of the 1713–14 revival of Armide (1686) she had the honour of presenting the victorious Marshal of Villars with a laurel crown. In ...

Article

Winton Dean

(b Bologna, c 1697; d Florence, ?March 1734). Italian tenor. He sang in Rome (Giovanni Bononcini’s Etearco, 1719), Ferrara (1724), Bologna (1724, 1731), Milan (1724, 1727) and other Italian cities, and was engaged on Owen Swiney’s recommendation by the Royal Academy in London, replacing Francesco Borosini in revivals of Elpidia (by Vinci and Orlandini) and Rodelinda (Handel) in 1725, and appearing in the unsuccessful pasticcio Elisa in 1726. Handel composed the parts of Laelius in Scipione and Leonatus in Alessandro (only one aria) for him and evidently had little confidence in his powers, but Fétis described him as a fine singer with an excellent method. The compass is d to a′, the tessitura fairly high. Antinori sang in Venice (1726 in Porpora’s Imeneo in Atene, 1731), Livorno (1725, 1730–31), Turin (1728), Genoa (1728...

Article

Philip Weller

( fl 1704–7). French soprano . After making her début at the Paris Opéra in 1704, as Venus and La Jeunesse in Destouches’ Le carnaval et la folie, she sang Iris in the revival of Lully’s Isis later that year. She created the role of Electra in Desmarets and Campra’s ...

Article

Dennis Libby

(b ?Rome, c 1720; d after 1755). Italian soprano . She is first found in comic opera in Naples in 1735–6, and was expelled from the kingdom for unknown reasons, probably her sexual conduct. She was seconda donna in opera seria in Parma in Carnival 1737 and rose to prima donna in Carnival ...

Article

David Cummings

(b Graglia, nr Vercelli, 1720; d Turin, Oct 28, 1757). Italian soprano. After study with Bravio in Milan she made her début at the Teatro Regio, Turin, in Il Ciro riconosciuto by Leonardo Leo (1739). She sang at the Teatro S Samuele, Venice, from 1739 and appeared with Caffarelli at the S Carlo, Naples (...

Article

(b ? Mainz or Frankfurt; fl 1727–46). German soprano. She sang in the Peruzzi company at Brussels, 1727–8, and was at Hamburg in 1729, where she sang Cleopatra in Handel’s Giulio Cesare and Rodelinda in Telemann’s Flavius Bertaridus. The same year she was engaged by Fortunato Chelleri as a singer at the court of Kassel. The librettos recording her two appearances at the Sporck theatre in Prague during the 1730–31 operatic season indicate that she was employed at the court of Friedrich I, King of Sweden and Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel, but it is uncertain whether she or her husband, Giuseppe Avoglio (also a musician at the Hesse-Kassel court), ever followed the court chapel to Stockholm. In 1731 she went with her husband to Russia, where she sang for the court opera of Tsarina Anna Ivanovna in Moscow and St Petersburg until 1738. In 1740, after the collapse of G.B. Pescetti’s operatic venture in London, she became closely associated with Handel. She is next heard of in Handel’s letter of ...

Article

Winton Dean

( fl 1698–1708). Italian soprano . Sometimes known as ‘La Valentina’, and probably of Ferrarese birth, her first known appearance was in Crema in 1698. She was employed at the Mantuan court until she entered the service of Ferdinando de’ Medici at Pratolino in 1700. A specialist in male roles, she appeared in ten operas there and in Florence, including Handel’s ...

Article

(fl 1726–43). Italian contralto. She was a Florentine in the employment of the Grand Duchess of Tuscany, and married to the tenor G.B. Pinacci (1732). She sang in Florence (1725–6), Bologna (1726–8), Livorno (1727), Naples (1727, in operas by Vinci and Hasse) and Milan (1728, 1730). She may have been the Anna Bolognesi who appeared in Venice in 1729, and she sang in Turin in 1731 (Porpora’s Poro). Engaged by Handel for the London season of 1731–2, she made her début at the King’s Theatre as Alcestis in a revival of Admeto on 7 December. She sang in the original productions of Ezio and Sosarme, in revivals of Giulio Cesare, Flavio, the bilingual Acis and Galatea and Ariosti’s Coriolano, and in the pasticcio Lucio Papirio dittatore. The two parts Handel composed for her, Valentinian in Ezio...

Article

Hans Joachim Marx

(bc 1700; d after 1726). German bass . He was mentioned in the Hamburg Relations-Courier (4 Dec 1724) as ‘the new bass Mons. Bahn’, who was billed to sing Argante in Handel’s Rinaldo at the Gänsemarkt theatre. He had previously made his début as Mars on 2 November in Giovanni Porta’s ...

Article

Winton Dean

(fl 1714–35). Italian alto castrato. He came from Cortona and may have sung in three operas at Palermo in 1714–16. He appeared in 13 operas in Venice (1722–4, 1729 and 1733–5), including works by Gasparini, Orlandini, Giacomelli, Hasse and Leo, in Genoa (1723 and 1730), Milan (1723 and 1725), Florence and Turin (1730–31) and Rome (1731). He was engaged for three seasons (1725–8) by the Royal Academy in London, making his début in a revival of the Vinci-Orlandini Elpidia. He sang in ten operas by Handel (four of them revivals), the pasticcio Elisa, Ariosti’s Lucio Vero and Teuzzone and Giovanni Bononcini’s Astianatte. The six parts Handel composed for him, Scipio in Scipione, Taxiles in Alessandro, Trasimede in Admeto, Oronte in Riccardo Primo, Medarse in Siroe and Alessandro in Tolomeo, indicate a narrow compass (a to ...

Article

Michael Talbot

(b ?Venice, 1700 or 1701; d Venice, Feb 1, 1733). Italian singer . Having sung contralto roles in operas performed in the provinces from as early as 1720, she made her Venetian début in Vignati’s I rivali generosi at S Samuele in 1726. Her career was short; the last opera in which she is known to have appeared was Orlandini’s Adelaide (S Cassiano, Carnival 1729). A contract that she made with Vivaldi on 13 October 1726 shows her to have been a worthy seconda donna; for singing in only one opera (Vivaldi’s Farnace, given at S Angelo, Carnival 1726–7) she was to receive 200 ducats, payable in instalments before, during and after the performances. Her retirement may have been caused by her marriage to a Venetian spicer, Angelo Venzoli. She died from an injury sustained when a carnival booth in St Mark’s Square collapsed.

R. Giazotto: Antonio Vivaldi...

Article

Colin Timms

(b ?Massa; fl 1723–41). Italian singer . He was in the service of the Duke of Massa and Carrara in 1724–5, the Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt in 1729 and the Hereditary Prince of Modena from 1730 to 1736. He appeared in eight operas at Florence between 1723 and 1737 and 11 at Venice, 1724–37, including new works by Albinoni, Antonio Pollarolo, Orlandini, Vivaldi and Porpora. He also sang at Livorno in 1727 and at Naples in 1740–41. He may have been married to Teresa Baratta, who appeared at Florence and Venice in 1735–7, Naples in 1739–41 and Turin in 1742–3. She may possibly be identified (according to Weaver) with the soprano (Maria) Teresa Pieri, who performed at Florence (1727–32), Naples (1728–30 and 1740–41) and Venice (1734–5); if so, she appeared as both Baratta and Pieri in 1740–41.

R. L. Weaver and N. W. Weaver...

Article

Olive Baldwin and Thelma Wilson

(d ?London, ?will proved Dec 9, 1757). English contralto. She first appeared in Almahide (November 1711) and the Spectator commented on her becoming shyness and her ‘agreeable Voice, and just Performance’. She had three seasons with the Italian opera, generally taking male roles, singing in Handel’s Rinaldo, Il pastor fido and Teseo. She was Telemachus in Galliard’s Calypso and Telemachus, which had an English libretto by John Hughes, whose poem The Hue and Cry described her dark good looks and headstrong nature. She appeared in masques by Pepusch, usually as the heroine, with Margherita de L’Epine as the hero, and from 1717 she sang with John Rich’s company in musical afterpieces, pantomimes and English operas. After appearing in Dublin in the winter of 1731–2, she was in two new operas by J.C. Smith and played King Henry in Arne’s Rosamond. Her career petered out after this; in ...

Article

Colin Timms

( b Reggio nell'Emilia; fl 1720–43). Italian tenor . From 1720 to 1731 (at least) he was in the service of the Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt, governor of Mantua, where he made his earliest known appearance, in the première of Vivaldi's Candace (1720). The composer seems then to have engaged him for Venice, where he sang in 23 operas from 1720 to 1738. He became well known throughout Italy, appearing in Reggio (1720), Rome (from 1724), Parma and Florence (both 1725 and 1734–5), Naples (1727–9) and Turin (1739–40). In 1731 he sang at Pavia in Vivaldi's Farnace alongside his wife, Livia Bassi Barbieri, who also performed at Venice and Florence, 1734–5; it is not known whether he was related to the contralto Santi Barbieri, who appeared in eight operas at Florence from 1730 to 1743. Later he was maestro di maniera...

Article

(b Bologna, fl 1716–67). Italian singer. She is referred to in some programmes as Ferrarese – perhaps through confusion with her father, the bass Francesco Belisani – but is the ‘Belisania’ mentioned in the celebrated frontispiece of Marcello’s Il teatro alla moda. She sang in opera seria and pastoral dramas from 1716 (Armida abbandonata), mostly in works by the Bolognese composer G. M. Buini, whom she married in 1721, but parts were also written for her by Vivaldi (Gliinganni per vendetta, 1720), Chelleri, Orlandini, Brivio and others. From 1727 she styled herself virtuosa of the Prince of Hessen-Darmstadt, governor of Mantua.

G. F. Malipiero: Antonio Vivaldi, il prete rosso (Milan, 1958) S. Durante: ‘Alcune considerazioni sui cantanti di teatro del primo settecento e la loro formazione’, Antonio Vivaldi: teatro musicale, cultura e società: Venice 1981, 427–82 E. Selfridge-Field: ‘Marcello, Sant’Angelo and Il teatro alla moda’, ...

Article

(b Quedlinburg, 1683; d Brunswick, 1724). German bass, son of the theorist J.P. Bendeler, who taught him. He is said to have enjoyed great success in north Italy and throughout Germany; he sang at Weissenfels and Brunswick (1708), Hamburg, Leipzig and Danzig. In 1712 he appeared in Handel's ...