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Article

Carolyn Gianturco and Teresa M. Gialdroni

(b Mosso Santa Maria, nr Biella, Jan 31, 1921). Italian musicologist. He took diplomas in piano at the Parma Conservatory (1942) and in choral music at the Turin Conservatory (1948), and studied music history with Della Corte at Turin University, where he took an arts degree (1946). He subsequently taught music history in the conservatories of Bolzano (1950–51), Parma (1951–5) and Milan (1954–88); he has edited the journals Almanacco musicale italiano (1954–5), Ricordiana (1955–7) and Musica d’oggi (1958–63) and has been vice-director of Enciclopedia della musica Ricordi (1960–64). He has been a consulting editor for Ricordi since 1964. Music education is one of his major interests: he became director of the series Manuali di Didattica Musicale and Canti nel Mondo (Ricordi) in 1965, and editor of Educazione musicale...

Article

(b Comber, Co. Down, Aug 10, 1904; d Oxford, Oct 10, 1965). Northern Irish music scholar, teacher, organist, composer and editor. He went to Bedford School, and studied at the RCM in London, Trinity College, Dublin, and New College, Oxford, gaining doctorates of music at both universities. In 1938, after four years as organist and choirmaster at Beverley Minster, he moved to a similar position at New College. Thereafter, he lived and worked in Oxford, where he was a university lecturer in music and a Fellow of New College, and later of Balliol. He also taught at the RCM.

Andrews's published work consists of three books, various articles (including contributions to the fifth edition of Grove's Dictionary of Music), reviews, and several motets, services and songs. The Oxford Harmony, vol.ii, traces the development of chromatic harmony through standard repertory works and relates this to techniques of composition. The opening chapters of ...

Article

Vilena Vrbanić

(b Zagreb, May 13, 1956). Croatian-American musicologist and editor. He studied musicology at the Zagreb Music Academy (BA 1980; MA 1983) and received the PhD at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (1997) with a dissertation on music in medieval and renaissance astrological imagery. He was a researcher at the institutes of musicology of the Zagreb Music Academy (1980) and the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts (1981; 1983–8) and also editor at the Croatian Music Information Center (1982–3).

He is affiliated with the Répertoire International de Littérature Musicale (RILM; in various functions since 1987; executive editor since 1996), and with the Research Center for Music Iconography at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (associate director 1991–7; director since 1998). In 1998 he founded the journal Music in Art...

Article

Jon Newsom

(b New York, Dec 1, 1905; d New York, Dec 16, 1967). American editor and musicologist. He attended City College, New York, and studied music privately, but as a music scholar he was largely self-educated. His career in editing and music publishing began with his appointment as associate editor of the Musical Quarterly (1945–67) and manager of the publications department at G. Schirmer (1945–54); he subsequently became chairman of the publication committee of the American Musicological Society (1952–4), executive director of the American Section of RISM (1961–5) and music editor at W.W. Norton & Co., New York (1963–7). He also taught at Columbia University (lecturer 1946–52, associate professor 1959–62) and served as president of the American Musicological Society (1963–4). He received a Guggenheim Fellowship (1956) and a Ford Foundation Grant (1961)....

Article

Ellen T. Harris

(b Los Angeles, April 13, 1930; d Venice, Feb 20, 1993). American musicologist and editor. He took the BA at Harvard College in 1951, then studied singing and conducting privately in Vienna. He returned to Harvard in 1953 for graduate studies with Piston, Gombosi, Merritt and John Ward and received the MA in 1954 and the PhD in 1959, with a dissertation under Ward on music in the French secular theatre of the Renaissance. While at Harvard he studied the flute privately with Georges Laurent of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and as a graduate student he conducted and performed both early and 20th-century music extensively in Boston and Cambridge. He first taught at Wellesley College, where he was instructor from 1958 to 1960. In 1960 he was appointed assistant professor at the University of Chicago, where he later became associate professor (1963), professor (1967) and chairman of the music department (...

Article

Richard Griscom

(b Lorain, OH, Mar 22, 1954). American music librarian, theorist, and editor. She received her undergraduate degree in music theory from Ohio University (BM 1976). While completing studies in music theory at Northwestern University (PhD 1985), she joined the staff of the Northwestern University Music Library (1980–98). Campana was also active in the promotion of contemporary music in Chicago through performances with the ensemble Kapture (1977–86) and by editing the monthly newsletter of New Music Chicago (1982–4). Her study of library science at the University of Chicago (MA 1987) led to her appointment as music public services librarian at Northwestern (1987–98). While at Northwestern, she also held appointments as lecturer (1993–8) and assistant dean for undergraduate studies (1993–4) in the School of Music and acting head of the Music Library (1994–6). In ...

Article

Paula Morgan

(b Eşfahān, Oct 11, 1908; d Francestown, NH, Sept 5, 1992). American musicologist and editor of Armenian origin. After taking a diploma at the American College in Tehran in 1927, he studied the violin and composition in Paris and New York, and became a composition student of Malipiero. He studied musicology at Harvard, where he took the MA in 1940 and the PhD in 1945, the year he founded the American Institute of Musicology, of which he was director.

Carapetyan's principal interest was the music of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. As general editor of Corpus Mensurabilis Musicae, Musicological Studies and Documents and, for some years, Corpus Scriptorum de Musica, he was responsible for the publication of a growing number of important collected editions, scholarly monographs and theoretical treatises. He was editor of Musica disciplina from its first issue in 1946 until 1988. He was publisher of all the American Institute series, which include, in addition to those for which he was general editor, Corpus of Early Keyboard Music, Miscellanea and the series Renaissance Manuscript Studies. Carapetyan also edited the facsimile of the Faenza Codex and a 14th-century vernacular theoretical treatise. His editorials in ...

Article

Tiberiu Alexandru

revised by Ruxandra Arzoiu

(b Timişoara, Romania, March 30, 1923). Romanian musicologist and lexicographer. He produced the first dictionaries of Romanian musicians, Muzicieni din România, in ten volumes (Bucharest, 1989–2011). He studied at the Timişoara Municipal Conservatory (1929–32) and the Bucharest Conservatory (1945–50), where his teachers included I. Dumitrescu (theory), M. Jora (harmony, counterpoint, and form), D.D. Botez (choral training), C. Silvestri (conducting), and Z. Vancea (music history). He then became a professor at the Alberto della Pergolla Conservatory, Bucharest (1945–7), and conducted several amateur choirs and orchestras in the city. He subsequently became head of the music department of the library of the Romanian Academy (1951–2) and taught at various Bucharest music schools (1951–63). He was successively appointed assistant lecturer (1951–2), lecturer (1964–71), and reader (since 1972) in the history of music at Bucharest Conservatory. From ...

Article

Edith Gerson-Kiwi

revised by Bret Werb

[Yuly Dmitrevich]

(b Berdyansk, Crimea, 4/April 16, 1868; d Tel-Aviv, Feb 11, 1927). Russian composer, critic, lexicographer and folklorist. He studied law at Kharkov University but soon turned to music, studying theory and composition with Taneyev and Ippolitov-Ivanov at the Moscow Conservatory (1893–7). From 1897 to 1919 he worked as a music critic for the newspaper Russkiye vedomosti. In 1901 his translation of Riemann’s Lexikon into Russian with newly written sections on Russian music was published in Moscow. Although an early opera, Esther, was performed in 1894, his work as a critic overshadowed that as a composer. Under the influence of the Russian nationalist music critic Vladimir Stasov, however, he turned his attention to Jewish folklore, collecting, arranging, performing and publishing the songs of eastern European Jews. In 1909 his first album of ten Jewish folksongs appeared in Moscow; a second volume followed later in the same year. Engel continued to promote his new interest with public lectures and a series of articles in ...

Article

Watkins Shaw

(b Paddington, London, Nov 11, 1870; d Windsor, Dec 21, 1951). English editor, scholar and cathedral musician. He showed marked musical gifts at an early age and when he was only seven Joachim offered to take him as a pupil. However, he received a conventional education at Winchester College and Oriel College, Oxford. At Oxford he read theology though he found time to develop his musical interests and remained for a fourth year working towards a music degree. On leaving Oxford he studied for the church and was ordained in 1894. He served for a short time as assistant curate in Wandsworth, London (1894–7), during which he took the Oxford BMus (1896). After three years as minor canon and precentor of Bristol Cathedral from 1897, he moved in 1900 to St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, as a minor canon, in which capacity he remained for the rest of his life. In the years between the death of Walter Parratt and the appointment of Walford Davies (...

Article

Travis D. Stimeling

[Chester W., Jr. ]

(b Fort Worth, TX, Oct 21, 1943; d Nashville, TN, June 19, 2013). American music critic, biographer, and editor. With contemporaries Ed Ward, Martha Hume, Dave Hickey, and Alanna Nash, Flippo helped bring country music criticism to the mainstream press in the 1970s. He earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Sam Houston State University and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Texas at Austin. As a freelance journalist and Rolling Stone Contributing Editor, he covered the progressive country music scene in Austin before being named Rolling Stone’s New York Bureau Chief (1974). From 1977 until 1980, he served as Senior Editor for Rolling Stone, using his position to significantly increase the magazine’s coverage of country music. During the 1980s Flippo wrote several book-length studies of country and rock artists, including Hank Williams (1981), the Rolling Stones (1985), and Paul McCartney (...

Article

Anthony Hicks

(b Fontmell Magna, Dorset, July 8, 1879; d Blandford, March 12, 1964). English author, collector and publisher. After training as a writer on various popular journals, Flower joined the publishers Cassell & Co. in 1906 and took over as proprietor in 1927. He was knighted in 1938. His purely literary work includes an edition of the journals of Arnold Bennett.

Flower’s musical interests were amateur. His books are marred by a poor literary style and the absence of scholarly discipline, though the use of previously unknown documentary material gives them some value. His important collection of manuscripts and early printed editions of Handel’s music (including the bulk of the Aylesford Manuscripts, copied for Handel’s friend Charles Jennens) was acquired by the Henry Watson Library, Manchester, in 1965.

Catalogue of a Handel Collection formed by Newman Flower (Sevenoaks, 1921) George Frideric Handel: his Personality and his Times (London, 1923, 2/1947)...

Article

H.C. Colles

revised by Frank Howes

(b Norwich, Sept 14, 1859; d Dinton, nr Salisbury, May 2, 1948). English musicologist, critic and editor. He was educated at Wellington College and Balliol College, Oxford (MA, 1882), and studied music for two years at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik. He became a schoolmaster at Dulwich College (1884–6) and a form master at Wellington (1887–1910), where he succeeded Alan Gray as the music master in 1893, a post he held until 1901, when he was made house master in college. During these years he wrote a Wellington College German Grammar and visited India, which aroused his interest in Indian music. When he left Wellington in 1910 he returned to India for eight months, collecting material for a book which is still a classic on its subject, The Music of Hindostan (1914); he also acted as Rabindranath Tagore's unpaid literary agent, ...

Article

(b London, April 7, 1856; d Carnforth, Lancs., March 30, 1936). English critic, editor and musical scholar. Poor health disrupted his early nonconformist education and apart from three terms at Westminster School he was, by necessity, taught privately. His musical education began in 1872 when he took piano lessons with Ernst Pauer. In 1875 he entered Trinity College, Cambridge, where he became friends with Stanford and W.B. Squire, whose elder sister he married in 1885, and with whom he participated fully in the flourishing activities of the Cambridge University Musical Society. After graduation in 1882 he studied the piano with Dannreuther and Rockstro; both took a keen interest in early music, but it was Rockstro who introduced him to harpsichord playing. Although he cultivated a reputation as an exponent of the piano and harpsichord, it was in the field of antiquarian studies and musical journalism that he found his true vocation. He was invited by Grove to write articles for his ...

Article

Carolyn Gianturco

(b Chieti, May 30, 1892; d Grottaferrata, nr Rome, May 10, 1973). Italian musicologist, editor and administrator. He began to play the violin when he was six and the piano when he was 12, and after schooling in Chieti he studied engineering at the University of Turin (1909–14). At 20 he was made editor-in-chief of the weekly Riforma musicale, published in 1913–15 and briefly in 1918; concurrently he organized concerts of contemporary chamber music in Turin. He founded and edited Il pianoforte (1920–27), which in 1928 became the Rassegna musicale (later with Ronga and Mila as co-editors); after an interruption during the war (1944–6) it moved to Rome (1947), where it subsequently became Quaderni della Rassegna musicale (1962). He also founded Studi musicali (1972–3). The first Congresso Italiano di Musica (Turin, 1921) was held partly under the auspices of Gatti's journal ...

Article

Israel J. Katz

(b Turgutlu, Turkey, Dec 23, 1896; d Aubervilliers, nr Paris, Oct 7, 1975). Italian composer, ethnomusicologist and music publisher. After education at the Alliance Israélite Universelle in Turgutlu, from 1907 he attended the school of the Société Musicale Israélite in Izmir, studying composition with Shemtov Shikayar and cantorial music with Isaac Algazi. He won a scholarship to Milan Conservatory, where he was a pupil of Zavaldi and Pozzoli (theory and solfège), Gatti (orchestration), Zampieri (history), Bossi (composition) and Andreoli (piano) (1914–15, 1917–19). His studies were interrupted by war service and Hemsi was severely wounded. He returned to Izmir to teach, then on to Rhodes (1923–7) and finally Alexandria. From 1920 he became intensely interested in the traditional music of Sephardi Jewry, collecting material around the eastern Mediterranean, in Alexandria, Jerusalem, Rhodes, Turgutlu, Manisa, Izmir and Thessaloniki. Most of the material in Coplas sefardíes, the work which established his reputation, was furnished by the Sephardi communities of Alexandria, Istanbul and Sofia; his well-suited piano accompaniments brought these songs into the salons and concert halls. In Alexandria he founded the Edition Orientale de Musique, the first Egyptian house to publish the work of composers familiar with Middle Eastern culture. In his own music he sought a compromise between Western technique and oriental tradition, believing that harmonic, equal-tempered music would replace microtonal heterophony. He founded a conservatory to propagate these ideas; he also established and conducted the Alexandria PO (...

Article

Richard Macnutt

(b Neath, Glam., July 3, 1898; d Albury, Surrey, April 28, 1977). English music bibliographer and bookseller. He was a civil engineer until 1931, when he founded the First Edition Bookshop. In 1934 his firm issued the first of a series of some 70 catalogues of antiquarian music editions, manuscripts, and books on music; these catalogues are of permanent interest for bibliographical reference. His major contributions to scholarship are his bibliographies of the first and early editions of Berlioz, Gluck, Field, Puccini and Verdi – pioneering works of reference and essential for scholarly work on these composers – as is his Dictionary of Parisian Music Publishers in dating French musical publications. His article ‘The Fundamentals of Music Bibliography’ provides a definition and a historical survey of music bibliography and a summary of his own principles. Hopkinson served on the Technical Consultative Committee of the British Union-Catalogue of Early Music from its inception in ...

Article

Paula Morgan

(b New York, March 4, 1857; d Babylon, NY, July 27, 1918). American writer on music. After studies in Wiesbaden and New York he attended Columbia University, graduating from the School of Arts in 1877 and the School of Law in 1879. From 1879 to 1880 he was editor of the Musical Review. Beginning in 1880 he was music critic for a series of New York papers, The Sun, The World, the Mail and Express, and The Herald; he was music and art critic for The Herald at the time of his death. In 1883 Kobbé was sent to Bayreuth by The World to report on the first performance of Parsifal.

A prolific writer, he is chiefly known for his Complete Opera Book (1919), a collection of opera plots and analyses, which has become a standard work of reference; he also published books on Wagner and other composers, opera singers, and works on the pianola and the Aeolian pipe organ....

Article

Katherine K. Preston

revised by Thomas L. Riis

(b Louisville, KY, April 13, 1932). American musicologist, music editor, composer, and bibliographer. He studied composition with Claude Almand and George Perle at the University of Louisville (BM 1954, MM 1959), composition with Gordon Binkerd and musicology with Dragan Plamenac at the University of Illinois (MS 1961), and musicology with Janet Knapp at Brown University (PhD 1976). From 1962 until 1964 he was curator of the Americana Collection in the Music Division of the New York Public Library and from 1964 to 1967 composer-in-residence with the Eugene (Oregon) public school system as a Ford Foundation Fellow. He taught at Ohio University (1967–8), Moorhead (Minnesota) State College (1971–2), and Wake Forest University at Winston-Salem (North Carolina), where he also served as director of the Moravian Music Foundation from 1972 until 1980. As a Leverhulme Fellow he taught at the University of Keele, UK (...

Article

Lyudmila Korabel′nikova

(b Moscow, 16/July 28, 1882; d Nikolina Gora, nr Moscow, May 5, 1951). Russian music editor. He graduated from the Moscow Conservatory having studied the piano and undertook concert tours with the singer Olenina d'Algeym; he was also involved with the work of the Dom pesni (‘House of Song’). In 1912 he began working as a music editor, and in 1918 he was made a professor of chamber music at the Moscow Conservatory, a post he held until his death. Throughout the 1920s and 30s he also worked for the State Publishing House (Gosudarstvennnoye Izdatel′stvo).

Lamm's main scholarly contribution was his pioneering editorial methods based on a careful study of sources and precise palaeographic methods. He initiated the publication of the collected works of Musorgsky (which remained incomplete) using the autograph manuscripts and the original texts, and Lamm was one of the first music editors to account for textual variants and provide an elaborate critical apparatus. Only later did flaws in his editorial decisions emerge, such as the combination of various versions of the texts, or the grouping of the cycles. He also edited the operas of Borodin based on the composer's manuscripts, although he did not complete ...