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José López-Calo

(b Évora, Dec 27, 1917). Portuguese musicologist. He studied music at the Évora Seminary and in Rome at the Pontificio Istituto di Musica Sacra, where he obtained the licentiate in 1951. From 1940 he taught music and conducted the choir at the Évora Seminary; he also taught at the Centro de Estudios Gregorianos, Lisbon, where in 1966 he succeeded Mario Sampayo as conductor of the Polyphonia, a choir devoted to the interpretation of early music (particularly Portuguese). In 1974 he resigned from both posts. He was made canon of the Évora Cathedral Chapter, where he was active as mestre da capela, in 1957 and was granted the honorary doctorate by the University of Évora in 1988. He has contributed to the encyclopedia Verbo and to various national journals, and has taken part in many conferences, both national and international. His publications may be divided into three fields: transcriptions of Portuguese polyphonic music, catalogues of Portuguese musical archives, and diverse writings on the history of Portuguese music, particularly in the cathedrals. His transcriptions are always extremely accurate and faithful to the originals and, at the same time, practical for choral use. His catalogues, though seldom including musical incipits, are complete, detailed and clear, and form the greatest list of musical sources in Portugal....

Article

Peter Andreas Kjeldsberg

revised by Martin Anderson

(b Fredrikstad, April 29, 1872; d Oslo, Dec 24, 1932). Norwegian composer, conductor and organist. He studied with Peter Lindeman (organ) and Iver Holter (harmony, counterpoint and composition) at the Christiania Music and Organ School (1888–92), and was then a pupil of Reinecke (composition) and Ruthard (piano) at the Leipzig Conservatory (1892–4). Appointments as organist followed in Drammen (1895–1907) and Oslo (1907–32), where he served at the cathedral from 1916; his First Symphony was completed during a course of study in Berlin in 1897. He was one of those responsible for the foundation of the Norsk Komponistforening, of which he was president from 1921 to 1923. As a member of the Koralbokkomiteen (1922–6) he harmonized most of the melodies in the chorale book of the Norwegian Church, and he edited preludes to all of the chorales. He was active as a choir-conductor, leading the Håndverksangforening (...

Article

Bernard Rose

(Henry Wait)

(b Peterborough, June 15, 1898; d ? Olney, Bucks, June 26, 1994). English organist, conductor, composer and educationist. He was trained by Haydn Keeton, organist of Peterborough Cathedral, where he was assistant organist, 1915–16. He then studied at the Royal College of Music and Keble College, Oxford. He became successively assistant organist of Manchester Cathedral (1921–2) and organist of St Peter's, Eaton Square, London (1922–8); during the later period he studied at the RCM with Holst and Vaughan Williams. He took the Oxford DMus in 1929. From 1928 to 1933 he was organist of Exeter Cathedral. In 1933 he was appointed organist of Christ Church, Oxford, and remained there until he was appointed principal of the Royal Academy of Music in 1955, a post from which he retired in 1968. He was knighted in 1958. While organist of Exeter Cathedral he was also director of music to the University College of the Southwest and this experience stood him in good stead at Oxford, where he achieved success as a tutor and lecturer and – in succession to Hugh Allen – as conductor of the Bach Choir and the Orchestral Society....

Article

Malcolm Turner

(b Wigan, Sept 15, 1890; d Aylesbury, May 24, 1979). English organist and educationist. He was a pupil of and assistant organist to Bairstow at Leeds (1907–12), and took the BMus (1908) and DMus (1914) degrees at Durham University, becoming a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists in 1909. His first important post, suborganist at Manchester Cathedral (1912–15), was interrupted by war service, after which he was organist at St Michael’s College, Tenbury (1919), and organist and choirmaster of Exeter Cathedral (1919–27). On Nicholson’s retirement from Westminster Abbey in 1928, Bullock succeeded him as organist and Master of the Choristers. In this post he was obliged to provide the music for several royal functions; for the coronation of King George VI (1937) he wrote the fanfares and conducted the choir and orchestra, in acknowledgment of which he was created CVO. He also provided all but one of the fanfares for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II (...

Article

Katy Romanou

(b Athens, Greece, May 5, 1969). Greek musicologist specialising in Byzantine music, university professor, cantor, and choir conductor. Chaldaeakes studied theology at the University of Athens. Due to his musical talent and vast knowledge of church music, he was employed in 1992 in the newly established music department of the same university, to assist professor Gregorios Stathis, the first teacher of Byzantine music in the department. In 1998 he earned the PhD in musicology there, and in 1999 he was elected a faculty member of the music department.

He is a diligent and ingenious researcher, with over 150 publications in Greek and other languages on Byzantine and post-Byzantine music and musicians. His scientific competence is well represented in the voluminous collection of Stathis’ writings that he edited in 2001. Aiming at closer communication between Greek and Western musicologists, he has collaborated with musicologists in the USA, England, Austria, Denmark, and Russia. As of ...

Article

Gerhard Wienke

(b Rothenburg ob der Tauber, Aug 4, 1931). German organist, church musician and conductor. He studied at the Musikhochschule in Munich (1951–3) with Karl Richter (organ), Fritz Lehmann (conducting) and Gustav Geierhaas (composition), and then privately with Friedrich Högner (organ). From 1953 to 1956 he read musicology, pedagogy and English at Munich University. He completed his organ studies in 1955–6 at the Paris Conservatoire with Marcel Dupré and Falcinelli. From 1956 to 1960 he held a post as organist in Kempten. He was appointed organist and church music director of the Stadtkirche in Bayreuth in 1960. He conducts the Bayreuth Kantorei and in 1961 founded ‘Musica Bayreuth’, an annual series of concerts. In 1968 Lukas founded a consort which he directs from the harpsichord; with this ensemble, and even more as an organist, he has made concert tours to central Europe and the USSR (twice with exclusively Bach programmes) and also to the USA and East Asia. In ...

Article

Eleanor Selfridge-Field

(b Turrida di Sedegliano, Sept 19, 1945; d Udine, Sept 17, 1997). Italian priest, conductor and musicologist. After a career as a schoolteacher in Codroipo (1970–73) and Udine (1973–80), he gained degrees in theology at the Lateran Pontifical University, Rome (1981) and musicology at Padua University (1986) under Bonfacio Giacomo Baroffio and Giulio Cattin. He then served as maestro di cappella at Udine Cathedral (1980–92) and began teaching choral conducting at Jacopo Tomadini Conservatory, Udine, in 1981. His interests spanned a wide range of sacred and secular repertories, in particular liturgical music in his native province of Friuli, elements of which he attempted to trace back to early Judeo-Christian practices in 1st-century Alexandria. Cognizant of continuing archaeological research on its 4th-century cathedral, he posited Aquileia and its divergent (i.e., non-Roman) musico-liturgical and iconographical practices with a significant role in the preservation of remnants of more ancient (possibly pre-Christian Essene) practices. Among these divergences was the celebration of Pentecost as the paramount feast of the Christian year. Some evidence for his views came from surviving music by Mainerio and transcripts of 16th- and 17th-century witchcraft trials....

Article

Katy Romanou

(Theophrastou)

(b Litochoro, Pieria, Greece [then, Ottoman Empire], 1854; d Athens, Greece, 15 December 1938).

Greek cantor, choral conductor, arranger of church music, music teacher, and composer. He studied philology at the University of Athens and was instructed in both Byzantine and Western music. He taught music in schools and in private lessons. From 1904 to 1907 he taught H.J.W. Tillyard the New Method of Byzantine notation.

In the controversy called ‘The Music Question’ (whether church music should preserve its monophonic texture and neumatic notation or become homophonic notated in stave notation), Sakellarides was an enthusiastic exponent of the second option. Gifted with a flexible tenor voice, he attracted large congregations in central Athenian churches, including the cathedral, performing his own versions of liturgical chant, the product of his elementary knowledge of harmony. He attracted also wrathful criticism from purists.

Collaborating with Athens University professor Georgios Mistriotis, founder in 1876 of the Etaireia pros diadosin ton archaion dramaton (‘Society for the Dissemination of Ancient Dramas’), Sakellarides wrote music for Euripides’s ...