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Article

Werner Gallusser

revised by Thomas B. Payne

(b Melbourne, May 1, 1929; d Armidale, June 30, 1981). Australian musicologist. He studied at the University of Adelaide under John Bishop, J.B. Peters and Andrew McCredie (BMus 1958, BMus Hons 1969, MMus 1970, DMus 1977). His scholarly activity concentrated on the music of the 13th century, particularly that of Notre Dame, and he produced a large body of articles and editions from 1969 to 1981. From 1970 to 1972 he was a research fellow at the Flinders University, Adelaide, and in 1973 he took up a lectureship in music at the University of New England, Armidale. Although he lived far from original sources and was able to visit Europe only once, he made a significant contribution to his field. Anderson played an important part in the establishment of an Australian Musicological Commission.

‘Mode and Change of Mode in Notre Dame Conductus’, AcM , 40 (1968), 92–114 ‘A New Look at an Old Motet’, ...

Article

Patricia Brown

(b Chatham Islands, New Zealand, June 24, 1948). New Zealand and Australian musicologist. He studied at Victoria University, Wellington, gaining the BA in 1970; moving to the University of Canterbury, he took the MA in 1972, and the doctorate in 1976, with a dissertation on John Coprario. He was a research fellow at the University of Sydney (1976–8, 1981–90) and at the University of Queensland (1979–80), and senior research fellow (reader) in musicology at the University of Sydney (1991–4). In 1990 he was elected Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. In 1995 he was made professor of historical musicology. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society in 2002 and was a recipient of Australia’s Centenary Medal in 2003. His main areas of activity have been European music, musicians and musical sources of the 16th and 17th centuries, particularly in England, Germany and Italy. He has rediscovered music and sources, and published meticulous studies of these and other materials, of which his annotated catalogue of the works of Giovanni Gabrieli, described by one reviewer as a ‘major breakthrough’, is a fine example. Early performing practice, especially of Venetian music, is another area where he has provided new insights. A prolific music editor, he has published critical editions of the complete works of Giovanni Gabrieli, Giovanni Bassano and members of the Ferrabosco family. Other composers on whose music he has worked include J.C. Bach, Giovanni Croce, Hans Leo Hassler, John Hingeston, Thomas Lupo, Claudio Monteverdi and Adam Gumpelzhaimer. Collaboration with recording artists, such as the Gabrieli Consort & Players, directed by Paul McCreesh, has resulted in a number of outstanding compact discs and a video, variously released by Deutsche Grammophon, Sony Classical, EMI Classics, Hyperion and others....

Article

David Tunley

(b Sydney, Feb 1, 1931). Australian musicologist, music critic and conductor. He graduated from the University of Queensland with the BA in 1964 and founded the department of music at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, in 1966 (the university first offered music as an interdisciplinary study before it established an institute of practical studies and music education). He took the doctorate at New South Wales in 1976 and was appointed Chair in 1984. His work covers a broad spectrum and includes writings on 17th-century Italian and 19th-century German and French opera, but his major contribution has been in Australian music. His Australia's Music: Themes of a New Society (1967) is regarded as the classic study on this topic, and his insights into the Australian repertory (and beyond) have been sharpened through his work as chief music critic at the Sydney Morning Herald (from 1960...

Article

(b Birregurra, Victoria, May 19, 1935; d Adelaide, May 30, 1996). Australian ethnomusicologist. After graduating in music at the University of Melbourne in 1956, she worked at the University of Adelaide analysing the Central Australian recordings collected by the linguist Theodor Strehlow. She took the doctorate in Glasgow in 1961 with a dissertation on Strehlow’s recordings of Aboriginal music. On her return to Adelaide she joined the university music department as a research fellow (1964–9) and subsequently lecturer (1970–84). She was professor of music at the University of New England (1985–95). During her time in Australia she and her husband, A.M. Ellis, did intensive fieldwork among the Pitjantjara tribe in the northern part of South Australia, analysing and comparing the results with those of earlier expeditions. In 1968 she started a musical education programme for both tribal and urban Aborigines which, whenever possible, involved people of different races in inter-cultural activities. In ...

Article

Murray Campbell and Clive Greated

(Horner)

(b Armidale, NSW, July 14, 1930). Australian physicist and acoustician. He studied at Sydney University (BSc 1951) and Harvard (PhD 1956); after a period working in industry and with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) Radiophysics Laboratory, he was appointed in 1963 to a chair in physics at the University of New England, NSW. In 1983 he became director of the CSIRO Institute of Physical Sciences and in 1988 visiting fellow at the Australian National University. He studied the flute with Victor McMahon in Sydney and James Pappoutsakis in Boston. Most notable in Fletcher’s extensively published research is his work with Suzanne Thwaites on sound generation in flutes and organ pipes, on flute performance techniques and on reed and lip-valve generators in woodwind and brass instruments. He also studied the vibration characteristics of gongs and cymbals, and with the composer Moya Henderson invented the alemba, a keyboard percussion instrument of tuned triangles. He is best known as co-author of the influential ...

Article

Werner Gallusser

(b Sydney, Dec 18, 1932). Australian musicologist. He graduated from the University of Sydney (BA 1954, MA 1959) and studied at the New South Wales Conservatorium (1949–55); he continued studies at Harvard University (1955–6), with Thurston Dart in Cambridge (1956–8) and with Herbert Howells at the Royal College of Music (1957–8). After five years as senior lecturer at the University of Western Australia (1960–65), he became foundation professor in 1965 at Monash University, Melbourne. He served on the UNESCO Advisory Committee for Music, the Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies’ Ethnomusicology Committee (1964–76), and the ABC Music Advisory Committee (1966–9). He retired in 1988. In the early years of his ethnomusicological research he worked with A.P. Elkin on indigenous Northern Australian music and became acquainted with the didjeridu, an instrument which he learnt to play himself and which he has described in minute detail, comparing it with similar non-Aborigine instruments. He has always strongly advocated including ethnic music in general education and developed a research plan for this purpose....

Article

Jere T. Humphreys

(b Melbourne, Australia, May 28, 1945). Music educator and scholar of Australian birth. She received degrees from the University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia (BAHons 1967, DipEd 1968), Andrews University, Michigan (MMus 1970), and the University of Calgary, Alberta (PhD 1976). She taught in public secondary schools in Australia (1968) and Canada (1968–9, 1971–6), and at Andrews University (1970–71), Notre Dame University in Nelson, British Columbia (1976–7), McGill University, Montreal (1977–86), and Indiana University (1986–). She was founding chair of the Philosophy Special Research Interest Group of the Music Educators National Conference (1988–94), and founding co-chair of the International Society for the Philosophy of Music Education (2003–5). She is editor of Philosophy of Music Education Review (from 1993) and The Philosopher, Teacher, Musician: Perspectives on Music Education (1993...

Article

Terry E. Miller

(b Adelaide, Nov 24, 1940). Australian musicologist and ethnomusicologist. She studied piano (diploma, 1961), music (BA, 1963) and composition (BM, 1964) at the University of Adelaide and took the doctorate in 1968 at Humboldt University, where she studied with Doris Stockmann and Usmann Effendi; she also took lessons in composition from Günther Kochan (1964–7) and performed her works in Berlin. She returned to Australia to teach at Monash University, Melbourne, where she was appointed research fellow (1969), lecturer (1970), reader (1974), director of the Institute for Contemporary Asian Studies (1989), and professor and chair of the music department (1989). She also served as president of the Musicological Society of Australia (1984–6), member of the editorial board of Musicology (1978–84) and Acta musicologica (1982–95), editor of the series Australian Studies in the History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Music, and was elected director-at-large of the council of the IMS in ...

Article

( b London, Feb 29, 1908; d London, Sept 29, 1982). English ethnomusicologist and folksinger . At the age of 15 he went to Australia as an assisted migrant, working on sheep stations for nine years. There he learnt bush songs from fellow workers and educated himself in music and the arts. Returning to England in the early 1930s, he associated with the left-wing London artistic set and became a founder member of the Artists International Association (1935). Needing money he signed on as a labourer on a factory ship for the 1937–8 Antarctic whaling season. The trip provided few folksongs, as the crew tended to sing hymns and popular hits. On his return he worked as a BBC scriptwriter and as a journalist on Picture Post. A self-taught ethnomusicologist, he owed much to the work of Brăiloiu and Katsarova. Influenced by A.L. Morton’s A People’s History of England...

Article

David Tunley

( b Sydney, Sept 3, 1930; d Melbourne, June 7, 2006). Australian musicologist and teacher . A graduate of the University of Sydney (BA 1951, MA Hons 1958), he also studied at the New South Wales State Conservatorium of Music before leaving for Europe. After studying composition with Lennox Berkeley at the RAM (1953–5), he took up musicological studies at the universities of Copenhagen (1955–6) and Stockholm (1956–7). In Hamburg (1960–63), where he was an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow, he took the doctorate in 1963 with a dissertation on German Baroque opera. In 1965 he was appointed senior research fellow at the University of Adelaide, where he later became professor of musicology (1978–94).

McCredie's initial research was in the fields of German Baroque opera, north German symphonic music from 1770 to 1830, and the sources of Byzantine and eastern European music from ...

Article

(Evan)

(b Invercargill, June 17, 1930). New Zealand ethnomusicologist. At the University of New Zealand he took the BA (1957), and at the University of Otago he took the MA (1959), and the doctorate (1965) with a dissertation on Maori chant. After studying further with Alan P. Merriam at Indiana University (1966–7) he was visiting professor at Indiana (1967) and Hawaii (1968) universities. He joined the staff of the University of Auckland (1968) and was associate professor of ethnomusicology (1975–92). He was founder-head of the Archive of Maori and Pacific Music (1970–92) and editor of the Journal of the Polynesian Society (1969–76). McLean’s main area of study is the music of Oceania. His fieldwork is of importance for research and preservation: his field recordings include 60 hours of traditional Maori chant recorded from ...

Article

Jere T. Humphreys

(b Parkes, NSW, Australia, April 1, 1954). Australian music educator and scholar. He was educated at the Sydney Conservatorium (DipMusEd 1977), Trinity College, London (LTCL 1976, FTCL 1977), Indiana University (MME 1982), and University of Sydney (PhD 1993). He taught in Australian public schools (1977–82) and at the University of Western Australia (1983–7), University of New South Wales (1988–2002), and Hong Kong Institute of Education (2002–5). He held the inaugural Marilyn Pflederer Zimmerman Endowed Chair in Music Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2004–9), and was president of the Australian (1995–7) and International (2004–6) societies for music education. He traveled extensively to facilitate international advocacy in music education, and directed an eight-nation study on children’s motivation to study music. McPherson has authored over 100 publications focusing on acquisition of instrumental performance skills, creativity, motivation, and curriculum development. He has edited four books, including ...

Article

Patricia Brown

(Stanley )

(b Holbrook, NSW, Jan 17, 1920). Australian folksong collector, folklorist and oral historian . In Sydney he came into contact with other enthusiasts for the collection and performance of Australian traditional bush songs and verse, and in 1954 he formed the original Bushwhackers band, in which he played the button accordion, as a means of ensuring performance of many of the songs and dance tunes he had collected. Also in 1954 he met Sally Sloane, with whom he established regular recording sessions; between 1954 and 1958 he recorded over 150 items from this one singer. From this period his collecting and recording activities became geographically wider in scope and more thorough. The culmination of this work was Folk Songs of Australia, i (1967), which remains significant for its wealth and variety of material, as well as for the information it offers on each song’s performers and social contexts. A heart attack in ...

Article

J.M. Thomson

revised by Paula Matthews and Jon Stroop

(b Sheffield, July 6, 1924; d Sydney, Aug 3, 2000). English and Australian musicologist and teacher . He studied at the RCM in 1941–2 and again in 1946 after war service, and at Oxford (1946–52), where he took the BLitt with a thesis on the life and music of Richard Dering. His teachers included R(eginald) O(wen) Morris, H(erbert) K(ennedy) Andrews, Donald Peart and Jack Allan Westrup. His professional career was spent in Australia and New Zealand; he was lecturer and senior lecturer in music at the University of Sydney (1952–7), then professor and chair of the music department at the University of Otago, Dunedin; in 1975 he was appointed chair of the music department at the University of Sydney. He also lectured in Europe, the USA and Hong Kong, and in 1990 he was awarded the honorary MMus at the University of Sydney, having become professor emeritus in ...

Article

(b Melbourne, Sept 7, 1935). Australian music historian. She studied at the University of Melbourne (MusBac 1958; MMus 1969) and gained the PhD in 1978 with a dissertation on Melbourne Musical Associations. She has published biographies of George Marshall-Hall, Dame Nellie Melba and Bernard Heinze and two anthologies of Australian folksong (A Treasury of Favourite Australian Songs, Melbourne, 1983; Songs of Australian Working Life, Melbourne, 1989). As Australian Research Fellow in the Department of Music at Monash University (1991–5) she commenced writing A History of Music in Australia, exploring her interest in the uses of music in the shaping of society. She has been active as an arts policy adviser (member of the executive body of the Australia Council 1984–7), with a particular concern for women in music. She has also had success with biographical plays on Percy Grainger and Dame Nellie Melba....

Article

Peter Walls

(Marie )

(b Wellington, Nov 26, 1943; d Wellington, New Zealand, December 4, 2010). New Zealand musicologist . She studied music history at Victoria University of Wellington (MA 1965) and King’s College, London, under Thurston Dart (MMus 1966). Research into lute music led to her becoming editor of the Lute Society Journal during 1971–2 and a close association with Gerald Abraham encouraged an interest in 19th-century Czech music. On returning to New Zealand in 1983 she became founder-editor of Early Music New Zealand (1985–8) and undertook work on the history of opera there, which led to three books. She was president of the New Zealand Opera Society from 1988 to 1990 and an advisor to Australasian Music Research. She broadcasted regularly for the BBC and Radio New Zealand. Simpson had shown, in her writings, criticism and broadcasts, an innate ability to communicate with a wide musical audience....

Article

Robyn Holmes, Peter Campbell and Judith Crispin

[Lazarus]

Robyn Holmes and Peter Campbell, revised by Judith Crispin

(b Tianjin, China, Sept 10, 1934). Australian composer, pianist, and musicologist. Born to Russian-Chinese parents, he emigrated to Australia with his family in 1951. He studied the piano at the NSW Conservatorium of Music, Sydney, where his teachers included Winifred Burston (1952–8), and in San Francisco with Egon Petri (1959–61). On his return to Australia, he taught at the Queensland Conservatorium (1961–5) and lectured on contemporary composition at the University of Queensland. In 1965 he assumed the position of Head of Keyboard at the newly founded Canberra School of Music (now part of the Australian National University), where he became Head of Composition and Head of Academic Studies in 1978, and Professor Emeritus and Distinguished Visiting Fellow in 2005.

Sitsky first came to prominence as a composer at the inaugural Australian Composers’ Seminar (Hobart, Tasmania, ...

Article

J.M. Thomson

(b Wellington, April 13, 1929; d Wellington, July 21, 2006). New Zealand musicologist. After taking his BA at the Victoria University of Wellington, and his MA at the University of Otago (1953), he was awarded the first New Zealand government bursary in musicology and became a research student under Thurston Dart at Jesus College, Cambridge, where he took his PhD in 1959. He was appointed lecturer in music at the University of Sydney in 1959. In 1962 he became lecturer in music at the University of Otago, where he was associate professor (1969–82), holding a personal chair until his retirement in 1994, then becoming professor emeritus. He specialized in early English keyboard music, the motets and madrigals of Peter Philips and madrigals of Marenzio, and in Italian Baroque church music (his special interests being Monteverdi and A. Scarlatti). His editions are used internationally. He was associated with the New Zealand Musicological Society from its inception in ...

Article

Martin Lodge

(b Blenheim, New Zealand, March 10, 1926; d Wellington, Sept 11, 1999). New Zealand musicologist . He studied the piano at the Nelson School of Music, then privately in Wellington and subsequently with Dorothea Vincent in London; he also studied the recorder with Zillah Castle (later with Walter Bergmann in London) and the flute with James Hopkinson. After military service (1944–5) he took the BA in English and history from Victoria University of Wellington (1948). A year later he founded the literary paper Hilltop. Following extensive editorial and publishing experience, in 1973 he founded the journal Early Music, and was its editor for ten years. Its outstanding visual appeal, combined with scholarly acumen and a flair for communicating, established it as a leading international journal in the field. Thomson returned to New Zealand in 1983 to work on The Oxford History of New Zealand Music...

Article

Roger Covell

(William )

(b Chichester, 1 Aug 1945; d Sydney, 19 June 2017). English musicologist, active in Australia. He studied at Hull University (1964–70) with Denis Arnold and Graham Sadler and was active as a pianist in contemporary music in the late 1960s and early 70s. He worked as a teaching assistant to Stockhausen at the Staatliche Musikhochschule in Cologne (1973–4) and in 1975 took a position as assistant lecturer at the New South Wales (later Sydney) Conservatorium, becoming senior lecturer (1981), and later head of musicology and chair of the musicology unit. He taught several of the middle generation of Australian composers in the early 1980s (including Gerard Brophy and Elena Kats-Chernin, for whom he wrote the libretto of a chamber opera, Iphis, 1997) and contributed much to Australian musical life with his teaching, his lucid programme notes, and radio and other lectures. His publications are mainly analyses and studies of later 20th-century music, especially of works by Stockhausen and by Ferneyhough, whose collected writings he co-edited with James Boros (Amsterdam, ...